The Films of Sam Newfield

 

Sam Newfield holds the distinction of being the most prolific feature film director of the American sound era. Because of his amazing output, no Newfield filmography will ever be complete. The following is an attempt to accurately catalog all of his known features and shorts.

Feature films are presented in order of production. If such information is not known, order is based on the PCA certificate number, which as a general rule—there are exceptions—adheres to the order of production anyway. Production dates, many of which are not listed in the AFI Catalog, have been culled from trade journals (much like the AFI), and surprisingly most of them have been found.

Except perhaps for one exception, all post-1938 films appear in order of production. There are some errors in the AFI Catalog, and these have been corrected.

Regardless of the few production dates that are unknown, notably the lack thereof between 1937–1938, the small profit margins of B pictures especially dictated that they were not making money if not at the exchanges: the films were usually made and released in succession, the PCA certificates generally reflecting this.

Sam Newfield was such a busy director, moving from one picture to the next, that any errors presented in the production order would be very minor. Except for a few exceptions, very little was held back for long in terms of distribution. Where PCA numbers do not appear sequentially, it simply means the production order has taken precedence, illustrating the occasional lapse of PCA numbers mirroring such order.

Those films where the production dates are unknown have two asterisks appearing after the running time.

Included below the release date for each feature film is the case file number assigned when reviewed by the New York censors. These numbers are sequential, documenting the order the films were reviewed before distribution.

 

The first PCA certificate was for John Ford's The World Moves On, issued on July 11, 1934.

 

Beginning on July 15, 1934, members of the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors Association (MPPDA) had to submit all films for approval to the PCA, the MPPDA's governing body for censorship. Initially the “purity seal” appeared preceding the title frame, then on March 15, 1935, it could appear in the actual credits for shorts only; on August 1, 1935, for features. Each film that passed had a unique certificate number, with those sanctioned at the New York PCA office preceded with the number zero (first was the Universal short Hits of Today, no. 01, issued on July 12, 1934); films re-issued but made before inauguration of the seal policy were prefaced with the letter R. Non-members of the MPPDA, notably the Independent Motion Picture Producers Association, routinely used the PCA's censorship services, so over 95% of American films up to the late 1940s carried a seal. On December 12, 1945, the MPPDA was renamed the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), as it is known today.

Following the filmography is a list of alternate titles to avoid confusion of a possible missing film. Notable for title changes are the PRC films, especially their westerns, many of which were retitled by Pictorial Films, Inc. (a subsidiary of Pathe Industries, Inc. which owned PRC) for distribution to television and other non-theatrical venues. Most of the other alternates are re-issue and UK titles. Working titles are not included unless they were actually used (e.g. the working title of Hold That Woman! was Skip Tracer, which Pathe later renamed for 16mm distribution).

Following the alternate titles is a poster gallery, most of which have been restored in Photoshop. Although representing more than a third of Newfield's feature output, the gallery is intentionally balanced with a cross-section of genres and brings to life to what is otherwise a colorless filmography.

 

Features, shorts and serials approved by the Production Code Administration

1934—1946

  1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 Total
Feature Films
MPPDA Companies   334 337 339 322 366 325 406 369 256 284 230 254 3,822
Non-MPPDA Companies   169 229 228 169 161 154 140 147 141 146 128 143 1,955
Foreign Productions   61 55 41 54 57 44 22 30 20 12 31 28 455
    ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
Total New Features   564 621 608 545 584 523 568 546 417 442 389 425 6,232
Reissues   338 142 55 49 12 7 4 2 0 0 1 0 610
    ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
Total New Features and Reissues 299 902 763 663 594 596 530 572 548 417 442 390 425 6,842
 
Shorts and Serials
MPPDA Companies   564 607 477 683 494 477 641 616 440 514 466 487 6,466
Non-MPPDA Companies   282 223 318 150 215 227 70 66 0 51 55 62 1,719
Foreign Productions   0 1 4 0 6 3 10 1 9 2 0 0 36
    ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
Total Shorts and Serials 497 846 831 799 833 715 707 721 683 449 567 521 549 8,221
 
Total Features, Shorts, and Serials 796 1,748 1,594 1,462 1,427 1,311 1,237 1,293 1,231 866 1,009 911 974 15,063
                             
Total New Features, MPPDA/Non-MPPDA Companies   503 566 567 491 527 479 546 516 397 430 358 397 5,777
Total New US Features Released (Film Daily) 480 525 522 538 455 483 477 492 488 397 401 350 378 5,506
Total Foreign Features Released (Film Daily) 182 241 213 240 314 278 196 106 45 30 41 27 89 1,820

The numbers shown are as originally published in The Hollywood Reporter's 1948 Motion Picture Production Encyclopedia, no doubt compiled from the annual reports of the MPPDA. Some of the numbers in the annual reports were later modified and published by the MPPDA with minor variances for some years.

The 1934 column was not listed in The Hollywood Reporter, with a note “Comparable data unavailable prior to 1935.” To compensate, the limited 1934 data is from a January 12, 1935, news item in Boxoffice: “Seal to Many. New York—Since the “purity seal” of the Production Code Administration under the direction of Joseph I. Breen came into being July 15, [1934] the stamp of approval has been applied to 299 feature pictures, it is announced. The seal also has been placed on 497 short subjects in the five and a half months.” These 1934 numbers, however, are not calculated in the Total column.

In their 1939 annual report, in a comparative item, the MPPDA stated 501 pictures were approved in 1934, with no mention if it represented features and/or shorts. The same report also stated 486 films were approved in 1933, although this was at a time before the seal itself. It is assumed the numbers represented features.

The numbers for total new US and foreign features released are from The Film Daily Yearbook, published annually of course, as reported in Reel Facts, The Movie Book of Records by Cobbett Steinberg. The numbers were not included in the original Hollywood Reporter data, but were added here for the sake of comparison.

Film Daily, March 11, 1935: “Shortening Purity Seal. As of March 15, the Hays production code approval will appear in a new and briefer form on short subjects, where it will be shown on an introductory frame instead of being shown on a separate frame, as at present. Change is being effected in order to reduce the length of screen time necessary for the frequent repetition of the longer form of approval due to the number of shorts on one program.”

Film Daily, July 24, 1935: “Change in Seal. Starting Aug. 1 the seal of approval of the Production Code Administration on feature pictures will appear in the same manner as is now employed on shorts. At present the feature seal is carried in a separate frame preceding the title frame. Under the new policy it will appear as part of an introductory frame, the proportionate size of the seal and code number to be uniform at all times. The purpose of the change is to obviate the extra running time required by having the seal on a separate frame.”

 

 

Sam Newfield Theatrical Features Based On Year of Production (208 Total)

1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945
5 3 12 9 17 15 14 13 15 20 13 15 14
1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958
14 1 5 3 6 4 2 1 1 2 2 2 0

Distributors: PDC/PRC (102), Republic Pictures (22, of which 21 were produced by Supreme Pictures), Lippert Pictures (14), Puritan Pictures (8, all produced by Excelsior Pictures), Victory Pictures (8), Spectrum Pictures (6), Tower Productions (5), Ambassador Pictures (4), Associated Film Releasing (4), Monogram Pictures (4), Colony Pictures (3), Film Classics (3), Grand National Pictures (3), Toddy Pictures (3), 20th Century-Fox (3), Eagle Lion (2), Paramount Pictures (2), Raynor (2), Supreme Pictures (2), Anglo Amalgamated (1, UK only), Associated Features (1), Columbia Pictures (1), Continental Pictures (1), Eagle Lion Classics (1), Eureka Productions (1), Excelsior Pictures (1), Progressive Pictures (1).

Newfield directed 36 per cent of PDC and PRC's total American-made output.

 

 

 

 

 

Feature Films

 

Year Title Distributor PCA # Producer Production Company Lead Player
1933 Reform Girl  68 Tower
3-4-33
(25402)
Sigmund Neufeld Tower Productions, Inc.
Premier Pictures
Noel Francis

Tower Productions has its roots in a company called Famous Attractions, with Morris Schlank initially aligned with J.G. Bachmann—former president of the defunct distributor Famous Attractions Corp.—and Louis “Pop” Corson, the trio announcing in June 1931 to make six films for the independent market. The first film, without the Neufelds involvement, would be The Secret Witness starring Una Merkel and directed by Thornton Freeland, which Columbia purchased from Famous Attractions after being lensed at the Tiffany Studio as Penthouse Murder.

In November 1931, the company was formerly announced, comprising Morris Schlank, Sig Neufeld, Joseph Simmonds and Herman Gluckman, the nucleus of the firm to be called Famous Attractions. Initially incorporated as Argosy Pictures Corp., with Simmonds as president, the name was soon changed to Tower Productions, Inc. The producing unit, invariably known as Premier Attractions, Premier Pictures, and Premier Productions, was headed by Schlank (a longtime independent producer) and Neufeld, with Gluckman—doubling as Tower's secretary-treasurer—to handle distribution through his Capitol Film exchange, encompassing the New York metropolitan area; other territories would be handled on a state rights basis.

Sam would direct five films for Tower, and Sig would be involved on a production level with all the company's output except the last film, The Big Bluff, which was made by an entirely different company. Morris Schlank passed away in mid-1932, and Sig then initially helmed the productions with the help of Schlank's son, Mel. The other seven Tower titles are as follows: Discarded Lovers (1932; no producer credited; directed by Fred C. Newmeyer), Shop Angel (1932; Morris R. Schlank; Sig as production supervisor; directed by E. Mason Hopper), Drifting Souls (1932; Morris R. Schlank; Sig as production supervisor; directed by Louis King), Exposure (1932; Morris R. Schlank; Sig as associate producer; directed by Norman Houston; Schlank had passed away just before production began but received producer credit), Red Haired Alibi (1932; Sig as producer; directed by Christy Cabanne), Daring Daughters (1933; Sig as producer; directed by Christy Cabanne) and the The Big Bluff (1933; George W. Weeks for Angelus Productions; directed by Reginald Denny).

Producer Leslie Simmonds was the son of Premier president, Joseph Simmonds.

Sam was assistant director on Daring Daughters, and it is likely he was involved in many of the films.

1933 The Important Witness  63 Tower
7-15-33
(25926)
Sigmund Neufeld Tower Productions, Inc.
Premier Pictures
Noel Francis
1933 Under Secret Orders  60 Progressive
10-17-33
(26516)
Ralph Like
Willis Kent
Progressive Pictures Corp. Donald Dillaway

Progressive Pictures was started in 1933 by Willis Kent and Ralph M. Like, the latter owning International Studios. Progressive made a few other features between 1933–1934 and then went out of business before the name was resurrected by Ben Judell in 1938, the precursor to PRC Pictures. Sam's next film, Big Time or Bust, was also filmed at International. The Variety review of Under Secret Orders listed it as a “Monarch production.” Filmed in July 1933, as Don Hank of Boston and Don Hank of San Lorenze.

1933 Big Time or Bust  62 Tower
11-10-33
(26531)
Sigmund Neufeld Tower Productions, Inc.
Premier Pictures
Regis Toomey
1934 Beggar's Holiday  59 Tower
6-2-34
(26849)
Sigmund Neufeld Tower Productions, Inc.
Premier Pictures
(filmed 1933)
Hardie Albright
1934 Marrying Widows  65 Tower
5-18-34
(27205)
Sigmund Neufeld
Leslie Simmonds
Tower Productions, Inc.
Premier Pictures
Judith Allen

It is unknown what Sam was doing for the better part of 1934. Although released in 1934, Beggar's Holiday was filmed at the Talisman Studios in November 1933, under the title She Was His Gal. His next film, Marrying Widows, at the Sennett Studios in February 1934, followed by Federal Agent at Talisman in late October 1934, and then Burning Gold in November at the same lot. Next was Northern Frontier, again at Talisman, started late December 1934 and finished early January 1935.

The oft-mentioned Talisman Studio was the former Tiffany Studio, where Sig was assigned as head of their shorts department in May 1930, directing the Tiffany Talking Chimps two-reelers and at least one two-reel prize fight comedy, One Punch O'Toole, based on H.C. Witwer's “The Classics in Slang,” starring Paul Hurst and Pert Kelton.

In November 1933 the Tiffany Studio was renamed Talisman Studio Corp., a rental facility that would become the base for Sam's subsequent productions for Select Productions, Ambassador Pictures and Supreme Pictures, among others, notably PRC. Many of the Tower Productions not helmed by Sam were also filmed at Talisman, although the last produced by Sig, Daring Daughters, was filmed at the Tec-Art Studio in late 1932.

After finishing Beggar's Holiday, the trades reported Sig's new job. Motion Picture Daily, November 23, 1933: “Neufeld Joins Roach. Hollywood, Nov. 22,—Henry Ginsberg has signed Sig Neufeld, former production manager for Stern Brothers in the old silent days, as head of the Roach story department.”

Sometimes listed in Newfield's filmography is African Incident (1934), starring Monte Blue, Virginia Brown Faire, Arthur Edmund Carewe, John Miltern and Claire McDowell. The 61-minute film does not appear in the AFI Catalog, nor any trade journals I have seen, but is listed in the Miscellaneous Talkies section of The Motion Picture Guide, which is probably the source of all modern references to the film.

On April 27, 1934, Film Daily reported that Sigmund Neufeld had been added by Mascot Pictures as a unit producer, and then on May 17, 1934, reported: “Mascot Pictures will start production on a Ken Maynard feature early next week, with the serial scheduled to go into production about four weeks later. Sherman Lowe and Al Martin now are writing the script for the Ken Maynard feature, which is as yet untitled. Sig Neufeld will supervise. Barney Sarecky and Wyndham Gittens are writing the Maynard story under the supervision of Victor Zobel.”

The feature mentioned would be In Old Santa Fe, which is credited to Victor Zobel as supervising producer. The serial mentioned would be Mystery Mountain, credited to Victor Zobel and Armand Schaefer as supervising producers. In Old Santa Fe began production mid-September 1934, and The Fighting Trooper, directed by Ray Taylor, with Sig as uncredited producer, began production late October 1934. The Mascot serial was filmed October 1934. It is unknown if Sig was actually involved in either of these productions for Mascot.

1936

Federal Agent  58 Republic
4-10-36
(30865)
George A. Hirliman
Select Productions, Inc.
Winchester Pictures
(filmed 1934)
William Boyd
1935 Burning Gold  58 Republic
12-1-35
(30228)
George A. Hirliman Select Productions, Inc.
Winchester Pictures
(filmed 1934)
William Boyd

Select Productions, Inc. was headed by William Saal and Burt Kelly, initially producing their films in the East. George A. Hirliman, under the Winchester Pictures banner, produced four actioners for Select starring William Boyd, all helmed by Newfield.

Federal Agent was Select's first coast production and began lensing on October 20, 1934, followed by Burning Gold in November under the title Salvage. George Hirliman resigned from Consolidated Film Industries, Inc., the parent company of Select Productions, Inc., in April 1935 to form his own company.

The films were given belated releases but announced earlier. Film Daily, June 27, 1935: “REPUBLIC LINEUP IS BOOSTED TO 57 ... Five Fast Action Group: “The Crime of Dr. Crespi,” with Eric Von Stroheim, and “Racing Luck,” “Federal Agent," “Go-And-Get-It Haines” and “Burning Gold,” all with Bill Boyd.”

1935 Northern Frontier  56 Ambassador
2-1-35
(28647)
Maurice H. Conn Ambassador Pictures, Inc. Kermit Maynard

Ambassador Pictures was formed in 1934 by Maurice Conn, the son of a former Rhode Island exhibitor, who soon partnered with Sig as half-owner, secretary-treasurer and associate producer. Sigmund Neufeld is not credited in any capacity on the print.

1936 Go-Get-'Em, Haines  63 Republic
6-15-36
(31331)
2466 George A. Hirliman Select Productions, Inc.
Winchester Pictures
(filmed 1935)
William Boyd

Although set on a transatlantic cruise, Go-Get-'Em, Haines was actually filmed on an ocean liner between Los Angeles and Panama, with only one scene appearing to have been filmed in a studio. The second cameraman on the film, Jack Greenhalgh, would be first cameraman on 107 of Newfield's features.

1935 Racing Luck  59 Republic
10-28-35
(29983)
George A. Hirliman Select Productions, Inc.
Winchester Pictures
William Boyd
1937 Crashing Through Danger  61 Excelsior
11-26-37
(35477)
1903 Sigmund Neufeld
Leslie Simmonds
Excelsior Pictures, Inc.
(filmed 1935)
Ray Walker

Another belated release from Newfield's early years, filmed in early April 1935 under the title Hell Breaks Loose. This was the first of the Excelsior Pictures, certified by the PCA in late December 1935 but not released in the US until November 1937, with a wider release in September 1938; the UK in August 1936.

Film Daily, March 14, 1935: Simmonds and Neufeld Form Producing Firm. Premier Pictures, formed by Leslie Simmons [sic] and Sig Neufeld, who plan nine action pictures using popular stars, will start activity on the first picture March 29. Headquarters have been set up at the Talisman studios. On April 6, 1935, Film Daily reported: Because of a conflict of title, Premier Pictures has changed the organization name to Excelsior Pictures, according to Leslie Simmonds and Sig Neufeld.

1935 Code of the Mounted  60 Ambassador
6-8-35
(29554)
971 Sigmund Neufeld
Maurice H. Conn
Ambassador Pictures, Inc. Kermit Maynard
1935 Branded a Coward  57 Supreme
8-1-35
(29785)
1135 A.W. Hackel Supreme Pictures Corp. Johnny Mack Brown

Supreme Pictures was formed in 1934, with A.W. Hackel as president and Sam Katzman as production manager. (The company is sometimes confused with Alfred T. Mannon's Supreme Features, Inc. Ltd., created in 1931 and sometimes noted as Supreme Pictures.)

1935 Trails of the Wild  60 Ambassador
8-7-35
(29976)
1174 Sigmund Neufeld
Maurice H. Conn
Ambassador Pictures, Inc. Kermit Maynard
1936 Thoroughbred  63 Raynor
5-13-36
(31230)
Burt Kelly Booth Dominion Productions, Ltd.
[Dominion Motion Pictures, Ltd.]
(filmed 1935)
Toby Wing
1936 Undercover Men  60 Raynor
5-13-36
(31235)
Burt Kelly Booth Dominion Productions, Ltd.
[Dominion Motion Pictures, Ltd.]
(filmed 1935)
Charles Starrett

J.R. Booth, president of Booth Dominion Productions, Ltd., was a millionaire lumberman who planned to make six features with Canadian themes in conjunction with Audio Pictures, Ltd., Toronto, and Du-Art Film Laboratories, Inc., New York, the companies headed by Arthur Gottlieb who was also a partner (secretary and treasurer) in Booth Dominion; Gottlieb's partner in Du-Art, Jack Goetz, was also involved as Booth Dominion's vice-president. (Due to a conflict with an existing company, the name was changed in October 1935 to Dominion Motion Pictures, Ltd.) Both films were released in the US in mid-1936, but were intended as British Empire-made ‘quota quickies’ for the UK market where they were released by MGM.

Motion Picture Daily reported on May 13, 1936, the two films available for US release by William E. Raynor, a former theater circuit manager, on a state rights basis, territories already closed with a number of independent exchanges. Film Daily also reported Raynor handling the films. Thoroughbred and Undercover Men were reviewed and classified by the National Legion of Decency in early June 1936, a general benchmark of distribution.

Filmed back-to-back between mid-August and late September 1935, with interiors at Booth's new Ravina Rink Studio—a former ice-skating rink and swimming pool—in Toronto, an untitled third film, with a bigger budget, was announced but never materialized. Newfield got the directorial assignments through Burt Kelly—married to Adrienne Doré, the leading lady in Undercover Men—who was the uncredited producer on both films, after working for him on the four William Boyd actioners. Sigmund had also worked with Kelly at the Tiffany studio as a production supervisor for KBS (Kelly-Bischoff-Saal) Productions.

Variety reported that MGM had contracted with Booth Dominion Productions to make a series of six features with the former paying all negative costs, giving the Canadian company rights to the United States and foreign countries outside of the British Empire.

Thoroughbred was released May 11, 1936, in the UK as The King's Plate and debuted in Canada under that title on October 26, 1936. Undercover Men was released April 6, 1936, in the UK as Under Cover, and it is unknown if it had a Canadian release.

1935 Timber War  58 Ambassador
11-20-35
(30336)
1750 Sigmund Neufeld
Maurice H. Conn
Ambassador Pictures, Inc. Kermit Maynard

The last film Sigmund produced for Ambassador Pictures. The others he produced in 1935 for the company, all starring Kermit Maynard: Wilderness Mail (directed by Forrest Sheldon), Red Blood of Courage (directed by John English), and His Fighting Blood (directed by John English). The first in the series, The Fighting Trooper (1934), directed by Ray Taylor, was produced solo by Maurice Conn but Film Daily reported that the picture was being produced along with Sig Neufeld.

Sam's 15-minute short, You Can Be Had, is next in the PCA seal order with number 1796, with New York censors case file number 30342.

1935 Bulldog Courage  61 Puritan
12-30-35
(30428)
1818 Sigmund Neufeld
Leslie Simmonds
Excelsior Pictures Corp. Tim McCoy

Film Daily, September 25, 1935: Simmonds, Neufeld Set On Tim McCoy Westerns. Arrangements have been completed for Joseph Simmonds and Sig Neufeld of Hollywood to produce the Tim McCoy westerns for the Puritan Pictures program. McCoy, who has been touring with the Ringling-Barnum & Bailey Circus, ends his season there early in October and will leave immediately for Hollywood to start work. Two of his features out of the ten scheduled for Puritan, “The Outlaw Deputy” and “The Man from Guntown,” have already been completed.

Film Daily, January 7, 1935: New Indie Firm Formed. New production and distribution firm headed by Louis Solomon has been incorporated under the name Puritan Pictures Corp., with Dave Gross as v.p. and sec'y, and headquarters at 723 Seventh Ave [New York]. Solomon says the firm is assured of a sound financial backing and that production plans now under way will be announced within the month.

1936 Roarin' Guns  64 Puritan
1-27-36
(30910)
1919 Sigmund Neufeld
Leslie Simmonds
Excelsior Pictures Corp.
(filmed 1935)
Tim McCoy
1936 Border Caballero  59  ** Puritan
3-1-36
(30873)
2031 Sigmund Neufeld
Leslie Simmonds
Excelsior Pictures Corp. Tim McCoy
1936 Lightnin' Bill Carson  71  ** Puritan
4-15-36
(31067)
2042 Sigmund Neufeld
Leslie Simmonds
Excelsior Pictures Corp. Tim McCoy

Variety, January 30, 1936, reported that production had started the day before on Trails End (a working title) starring Tim McCoy and Lois January for Excelsior. She co-starred in both Border Caballero and Lightnin' Bill Carson, so it is unknown which was filmed first.

1936 Aces and Eights  61  ** Puritan
6-6-36
(31236)
2116 Sigmund Neufeld
Leslie Simmonds
Excelsior Pictures Corp. Tim McCoy
1936 The Lion's Den  59  ** Puritan
7-6-36
(31396)
2214 Sigmund Neufeld
Leslie Simmonds
Excelsior Pictures Corp. Tim McCoy
1936 Ghost Patrol  56   ** Puritan
8-3-36
(31564)
2287 Sigmund Neufeld
Leslie Simmonds
Excelsior Pictures Corp. Tim McCoy
1936 The Traitor  56 Puritan
8-29-36
(31828)
2332 Sigmund Neufeld
Leslie Simmonds
Excelsior Pictures Corp. Tim McCoy

Completed in late March 1936, The Traitor was the last of the Excelsior films, the oaters pumped out quickly in typical B movie fashion. The company, using the Talisman and Reliable studios (former Stern Bros. lot), planned to make more for the 1936–37 season, including two based on Jack London stories and a series of melodramas and westerns, but none were made.

Variety, August 14, 1936, reported that Sigmund Neufeld had joined Columbia as a producer of B pictures, yet he received no such credits until 1939, with Producers Pictures. The trades seem devoid of any reference to Sigmund between this time, his job most likely as a backroom production executive.

1936 Stormy Trails  58 Colony
12-23-36
(32138)
2682 Arthur Alexander
Max Alexander
Colony Pictures, Inc. Rex Bell

Colony Pictures was formed in 1936 by Arthur and Max Alexander, the latter once executive assistant to Jules Stern and business manager of Stern Film Corp., where the Neufelds made so many two-reelers in the 1920s. With the demise of Stern in 1929, the Alexander Brothers would purchase the studio and use it as a rental plant, National Recording Studios, renaming it Alexander Bros. Studio in 1933.

Often listed as a Grand National release, the film was distributed on the state rights market by Colony with GN handling the New York exchange area and perhaps some others.

1936 Roarin' Lead  53
(co-director: Mack V. Wright)
Republic
12-9-36
(32108)
2805 Nat Levine Republic Pictures Corp. Bob Livingston
1937 Bar-Z Bad Men  51 Republic
1-20-37
(32366)
2913 A.W. Hackel Supreme Pictures Corp.
(filmed 1936)
Johnny Mack Brown

Up to 1936, A.W. Hackel had been making the Bob Steele and Johnny Mack Brown westerns under his own Supreme Pictures banner, distributed under the state rights system. With the formation of Republic Pictures in 1935, Hackel joined the producers roster there in mid-1936, and his productions were subsequently known under the Republic name.

The average budget for each film for the 1936–1937 season was $13,500, and $16,500 for the 1937–1938 season—including all post-production work.

1937 The Gambling Terror  55   ** Republic
2-15-37
(32512)
2962 A.W. Hackel Supreme Pictures Corp. Johnny Mack Brown
1937 Trail of Vengeance  55 Republic
3-29-37
(32659)
3019 A.W. Hackel Supreme Pictures Corp. Johnny Mack Brown
1937 Lightnin' Crandall  58 Republic
3-24-37
(32694)
3056 A.W. Hackel Supreme Pictures Corp. Bob Steele
1937 Guns in the Dark  57 Republic
4-14-37
(32842)
3119 A.W. Hackel Supreme Pictures Corp. Johnny Mack Brown
1937 Gun Lords of Stirrup Basin  55   ** Republic
5-10-37
(32989)
3152 A.W. Hackel Supreme Pictures Corp. Bob Steele
1937 Melody of the Plains  53 Spectrum
4-15-37
(32928)
3193 Jed Buell Spectrum Pictures Corp.
De Luxe Pictures, Inc.
Fred Scott

Jed Buell was a former theater circuit manager who became publicity director for the Sennett Studios, later freelancing in that field, handling various producers including Neufeld's Excelsior Pictures. Buell was also the head of the Sennett Studios rental department, shortly venturing into production with the formation of Rainbow Pictures, a company in name only. In mid-1936 he formed De Luxe Pictures, Inc., along with George H. Callaghan, its president, to make a series of six musical westerns starring Fred Scott.

New York-based Spectrum Pictures was formed in 1934, apparently from the warm ashes of the defunct Amity Pictures Corp., and established a new distribution network of state rights exchanges to handle the independent films the company would finance. Except for one exception, the company's product was comprised of westerns featuring Bill Cody and Fred Scott.

Coinciding with the formation of De Luxe Pictures, Scott signed a six-picture contract with Spectrum, the series to be produced by Jed Buell. The next series of Fred Scott westerns would see the crooner sign a five-year contract with the Stan Laurel Corp., the films produced under the Stan Laurel Pictures banner, but only three were made. The four subsequent Scott westerns for Spectrum were produced by C.C. Burr's Atlas Productions, although the last, Ridin' the Trail, filmed in November 1939, was released by another company in July 1940 with the demise of Spectrum.

Although known as De Luxe Pictures, Inc., that name was never used in advertizing or on film. The company was also known as Jed Buell Productions, whose product was usually referenced as a “Buell-Callaghan production” or vice versa.

Film Daily, June 25, 1936: George H. Callaghan Heads Newly Formed De Luxe Pics. De Luxe Pictures, Inc., newly formed, has elected George H. Callaghan president, in charge of distribution, with Jed Buell elected secretary and treasurer, in charge of production. Board of directors includes Mary K. Suter, Jed Buell, Hugh W. Darling and E. M. Mortensen. Headquarters will be at the Talisman studios. Callaghan has come on from New York to confer on the program.

Motion Picture Daily, June 29, 1936: Spectrum Signs Scott. Spectrum Pictures has signed Fred Scott for a new series of six musical westerns. De Luxe Pictures, recently incorporated, will produce.

1937 A Lawman Is Born  61   ** Republic
6-21-37
(33246)
3281 A.W. Hackel Supreme Pictures Corp. Johnny Mack Brown
1937 Doomed at Sundown  54 Republic
6-7-37
(33149)
3326 A.W. Hackel Supreme Pictures Corp. Bob Steele
1937 Boothill Brigade  56   ** Republic
8-2-37
(33385)
3396 A.W. Hackel Supreme Pictures Corp. Johnny Mack Brown
1937 The Fighting Deputy  57 Spectrum
8-1-37
(33335)
3476 Jed Buell Spectrum Pictures Corp.
De Luxe Pictures, Inc.
Fred Scott
1937 Moonlight on the Range  52 Spectrum
10-1-37
(33607)
3550 Jed Buell Spectrum Pictures Corp.
De Luxe Pictures, Inc.
Fred Scott
1937 The Arizona Gunfighter  57 Republic
9-20-37
(33687)
3597 A.W. Hackel Supreme Pictures Corp. Bob Steele
1937 Ridin' the Lone Trail  56 Republic
11-1-37
(33925)
3598 A.W. Hackel Supreme Pictures Corp. Bob Steele
1937 The Colorado Kid  56 Republic
12-13-37
(34128)
3728 A.W. Hackel Supreme Pictures Corp. Bob Steele
1938 Paroled—To Die  55   ** Republic
1-10-38
(34347)
3772 A.W. Hackel Supreme Pictures Corp.
(filmed 1937)
Bob Steele
1937 Harlem on the Prairie  55 Associated
12-9-37
(34314)
3856 Jed Buell
Associated Features, Inc. Herbert Jeffries

At the start of production, the company's name was changed from Lincoln Pictures, Inc., to Associated Features, Inc. When the film was announced in Film Daily, October 12, 1937, it reported: Sabin W. Carr, Santa Barbara financier, is associated with Jed Buell and has formed Metropolitan Pictures, Inc., for the purpose of making six Negro features for the colored theaters in America.

The AFI Catalog lists the PCA number for Harlem on the Prairie as 3901, but the Motion Picture Herald review lists it as 3856.

1938 The Rangers' Round-Up  55 Spectrum
2-15-38
(34545)
3990 Jed Buell Stan Laurel Pictures, Inc.
De Luxe Pictures, Inc.
(filmed 1937)
Fred Scott

Film Daily, November 12, 1937: The organization [Stan Laurel Corp.] has signed Fred Scott to a five-year contract to star in musical westerns. Scott will complete his six pictures for Spectrum Pictures Corp. Jed Buell will produce all of the Scott pictures for the Stan Laurel Corp.

Film Daily, November 22, 1937: Sam Newfield has been signed by Jed Buell to direct “The Rangers' Roundup,” which stars Fred Scott and which Buell is producing for the Stan Laurel Pictures Corporation. The pictures are being released by Spectrum Pictures Corporation.

1938 Thunder in the Desert  56   ** Republic
2-21-38
(34601)
3931 A.W. Hackel Supreme Pictures Corp. Bob Steele
1938 The Feud Maker  55   ** Republic
4-18-38
(34806)
3997 A.W. Hackel Supreme Pictures Corp. Bob Steele
1938 Code of the Rangers  56 Monogram
3-9-38
(34669)
4084 Maurice H. Conn Concord Productions, Inc. Tim McCoy

Film Daily, November 13, 1937: Maurice Conn, head of Ambassador Pictures and the newly-formed Concord Productions, is to produce eight westerns during the 1937–38 season for Monogram release, it was announced yesterday by Scott R. Dunlap, Monogram vice-president in charge of production.

Code of the Rangers started production on January 21, 1938, so the previous two films starring Bob Steele were likely filmed in December 1937, or early January 1938. The last two of Steele's westerns for Supreme were filmed back-to-back, and it is likely Thunder in the Desert and The Feud Maker were too.

1938 Songs and Bullets  58 Spectrum
4-15-38
(34986)
4167 Jed Buell Stan Laurel Pictures, Inc.
De Luxe Pictures, Inc.
Fred Scott
1938 Phantom Ranger  57 Monogram
5-29-38
(35084)
4199 Maurice H. Conn Concord Productions, Inc. Tim McCoy
1938 Knight of the Plains  61 Spectrum
5-12-38
(35173)
4241 Jed Buell Stan Laurel Pictures, Inc.
De Luxe Pictures, Inc.
Fred Scott

Motion Picture Daily, April 8, 1938: Buell Quits Laurel; To Produce on Own. Jed Buell today received a release from his producing contract with Stan Laurel Pictures, Inc., and now will produce on his own under the style of Associated Pictures, Inc. Stan Laurel, with L.A. French as his business manager, will produce the remaining Fred Scott musical westerns, three of which will be released through the state rights market under Spectrum and the balance, possibly, through a major company.

1938 Gunsmoke Trail  57 Monogram
5-8-38
(35038)
4225 Maurice H. Conn Concord Productions, Inc. Jack Randall

Newfield's fastest shoot to the author's knowledge: filmed in four consecutive days, three of which were exteriors.

1938 Desert Patrol  56 Republic
6-27-38
(35109)
4242 A.W. Hackel Supreme Pictures Corp. Bob Steele
1938 Durango Valley Raiders  56 Republic
8-22-38
(35450)
4243 A.W. Hackel Supreme Pictures Corp. Bob Steele
1938 The Terror of Tiny Town  62 Columbia
12-1-38
(35307)
4424 Jed Buell Jed Buell Productions
Principal Productions, Inc.
Billy Curtis

Film Daily, June 13, 1938: Sol Lesser has bought an interest in “Terror of Tiny Town,” Jed Buell picture featuring 80 odd midgets. He approved the additional budget covering an extra two weeks of shooting and formulated plans to continue a series with the same players. Principal had this film in very limited distribution before Columbia picked it up in August for a December 1, 1938 release.

1938 Frontier Scout  61 Grand National
10-21-38
(35732)
4606 Franklyn Warner Fine Arts Pictures, Inc. George Houston

Film Daily, May 31, 1938: Twenty-six pictures to be made by Fine Arts Pictures, Inc., are to be released by Grand National during the 1938–39 season, it is reported here. Fine Arts is headed by Franklyn Warner. Film Daily review: Credit for this noteworthy western should go to Maurice Conn, who handled it as associate producer, Franklyn Warner, the executive producer, Sam Berkowitz, the executive manager.

Grand National Films was incorporated on March 28, 1936, the company eventually setting up its own national exchange system and taking a ten-year lease on the Educational Studios, only to be mired in financial trouble, first in February 1938 under Section 77B of the Bankruptcy Act, giving GN the opportunity to reorganize and refinance. In August 1938 the company merged with Educational Pictures, Inc., creating Grand National Pictures, Inc., but the financial problems would continue. The company officially ceased business on January 10, 1940, its assets soon sold at auction. The mortgage on the Educational/Grand National Studios, with seven stages and 10 acres of land, was owned by Erpi (Electrical Research Products, Inc.), a subsidiary of Western Electric.

1938 Lightning Carson Rides Again  58 Victory
10-10-38
(35648)
4669 Sam Katzman Victory Pictures Corp. Tim McCoy
“Lightning” Bill Carson series

Victory Pictures was formed in 1935 by Sam Katzman, a former production supervisor for A.W. Hackel's Supreme Pictures. Victory took over the former Bryan Foy Studio at 9147 Venice Blvd., Culver City, but it was destroyed by fire in January 1938. Victory would then use the International Studios and Conn (Reliable) Studios.

1938 Six-Gun Trail  56 Victory
11-25-38
(36106)
4779 Sam Katzman Victory Pictures Corp. Tim McCoy
“Lightning” Bill Carson series
1939 Trigger Pals  55 Grand National
1-14-39
(36210)
4979 Philip N. Krasne Cinemart Productions, Inc.
(filmed 1938)
Art Jarrett

Film Daily, November 11, 1938: Grand National sends the first of a new series of six westerns into production today, title, “Trigger Pals,” starring Arthur Jarrett, band leader, whose name will be changed to Art Jarrett .... Producer of the new series is Phil Krasne, and the company will be known as Cinema Arts, Inc. The company, as reflected on the print itself, was Cinemart Productions, Inc., this being the only film produced under that name.

1938 Outlaws' Paradise  56 Victory
12-30-38
(36146)
4914 Sam Katzman Victory Pictures Corp. Tim McCoy
“Lightning” Bill Carson series
1939 Code of the Cactus  57 Victory
2-25-39
(36577)
5004 Sam Katzman Victory Pictures Corp. Tim McCoy
“Lightning” Bill Carson series
1939 Six-Gun Rhythm  56 Grand National
5-13-39
(36888)
5089 Sam Newfield Arcadia Pictures Corp. Tex Fletcher

Film Daily, December 22, 1938: With the renewal of Grand National's pact with Fine Arts, GN will swing into production Monday with two producing companies in work. A newly formed organization, Arcadia Pictures, will supply a portion of GN's program, it was learned. Arcadia Pictures was a corporate entity started by Jack H. Skirball, Grand National's vice-president in charge of production, who would use that name as an independent producer.

A rare producer credit for Sam although no one is actually listed in the credits except for Norman Haskall as associate producer. Sam was poised to direct a series of six musical westerns for Arcadia Pictures, releasing through Grand National, starring former heavyweight boxing champion Max Baer, with the first title to be Two-Fisted Cowboy, but they were never made since the company would soon fold in bankruptcy. Tex Fletcher was to make six as well, but Six-Gun Rhythm—initially announced as Rhythm Rides the Range and Rhythm on the Range—would be the only one.

1939 Fighting Mad  54   ** Monogram
11-5-39
(37943)
Philip N. Krasne Criterion Pictures Corp. James Newill

Film Daily, August 29, 1939: Monogram has closed a contract with Phil Goldstone, Criterion Pictures prexy, to release six productions which Criterion will make based on Laurie York Erskine's “Renfrew” novels. Two of the features have been completed—“Crashing Thru,” another still untitled [“Fighting Mad”], both of which are available for immediate release. Two others go into production after Labor Day. Phil Krasne is producing the series, and Jimmy Newill will enact the title role.

The film was listed as a pending Grand National release for February 10, 1939, under the titles To the Rescue and Renfrew Saves a Lady, both with production number 328, but did not hit theaters until November, released by Monogram. Variety, December 27, 1938, reported next of the Renfrew of the Royal Mounted features being readied at Grand National, with Sally Blane to play the femme lead. Adding to the confusion, Variety, September 30, 1938, reported Jack Brooks had written the songs “Trail's End” and “Lady in Distress” for Renfrew of the Mounted, featuring James Newill for Criterion Pictures. These appeared in Fighting Mad, so the film may have been made in the summer of 1938, just after Crashing Thru (production number 327) which started shooting on August 8, 1938. Motion Picture Daily, February 10, 1939, reported Phil Goldstone was holding out on two Renfrew of the Royal Mounted pictures, so in the least Fighting Mad was completed by that time, likely made after Six-Gun Rhythm which started production on January 9, 1939.

1939 Texas Wildcats  57 Victory
4-10-39
(36775)
5145 Sam Katzman Victory Pictures Corp. Tim McCoy
“Lightning” Bill Carson series
1939 Flaming Lead  57 Colony
6-1-39
(37110)
5287 Max Alexander
Arthur Alexander
Colony Pictures, Inc. Ken Maynard
1939 Trigger Fingers  55 Victory
6-1-39
(37628)
5306 Sam Katzman Victory Pictures Corp. Tim McCoy
“Lightning” Bill Carson series
1939 Straight Shooter  54 Victory
9-26-39
(37558)
5491 Sam Katzman Victory Pictures Corp. Tim McCoy
“Lightning” Bill Carson series
1939 The Fighting Renegade  54 Victory
8-22-39
(37346)
5501 Sam Katzman Victory Pictures Corp. Tim McCoy
“Lightning” Bill Carson series

Although the last in the “Lightning” Bill Carson series with Tim McCoy, Straight Shooter began production on June 19, 1939, while The Fighting Renegade began on June 26, 1939. The latter would be the last film produced by Victory Pictures.

1939 Death Rides the Range  58   ** Colony
8-25-39
(37801)
5503 Max Alexander
Arthur Alexander
Colony Pictures, Inc. Ken Maynard

The production timeline of this film is unknown. With the completion of the first in a series of six Ken Maynard westerns, Flaming Lead (directed by Newfield), completed by the end of March 1939, the trades announced the second was scheduled to go into production in a few weeks, which would have been Death Rides the Range. The third film, Phantom Rancher (directed by Harry Fraser), was completed by at least November 1939, yet not released until March 1940. This was followed by Lightning Strikes West (again directed by Harry Fraser, in mid-January 1940), the last in the series of which only four of the announced six titles were made. Death Rides the Range, commonly listed with much later release dates, was likely made just after Flaming Lead or Trigger Fingers.

Max and Arthur Alexander had produced two Ken Maynard westerns in 1938, with distribution by Grand National. With that company mired in financial trouble, the Alexanders shifted to the state rights market for Maynard's other films, creating a somewhat muddled release schedule as staggered territorial agreements were made across the country.

1939 Hitler—Beast of Berlin  87
(as Sherman Scott)
PDC
10-29-39
(37719)
5718 Ben Judell  Producers Pictures Corp. Roland Drew

Film Daily, May 26, 1939: NEW JUDELL COMPANY PLANS 36 FEATURES. Formation of a new national production and distribution company with a program of 36 pictures planned for the 1939–40 season was disclosed yesterday by Ben Judell, producer and distributor. Judell stated that a budget for the pictures had been set, with $1,000,000 as the minimum, production is to start in July and the three pictures scheduled for release per month will be effective, starting in early September.

Starting production on September 19, 1939, this was Sam Newfield's first film for Ben Judell's newly formed Producers Pictures Corp., soon to be known as Producers Releasing Corp. and, in 1943, PRC Pictures. The distributing arm was initially called Producers Distributing Corp. (PDC). Controversial during the time, the film was released as Beast of Berlin, Beasts of Berlin and Goose Step (the title used for its PCA seal). Sam begins directing under the aliases Sherman Scott and Peter Stewart to cover his dolly tracks.

Along with Ben Judell, Sigmund produced three films for the new company without Sam in the director's chair, all released in 1939: Torture Ship (directed by Victor Halperin), Buried Alive (directed by Victor Halperin), and Mercy Plane (directed by Richard Harlan).

1940 The Invisible Killer  61
(as Sherman Scott)
PDC
1-16-40
(38085)
5862 Ben Judell Producers Pictures Corp.
(filmed 1939)
Grace Bradley
1939 Secrets of a Model  61 Continental
12-6-39
(38009)
J.D. Kendis Continental Pictures, Inc.
Sharon Lee

Started on November 6, 1939, immediately after The Invisible Killer wrapped up, the earliest known release of Secrets of a Model was in New York on April 11, 1940. Film Daily, November 28, 1939: J.D. Kendis, producer of Continental Pictures, Inc., has completed “Secrets of a Model.” The picture will be ready for release Dec. 1, and Kendis plans to leave here for New York about that time to make arrangements for the release of the picture. The scarcity of release information no doubt means the film was mostly roadshowed. The National Legion of Decency classified the film in February 1940.

1940 The Sagebrush Family Trails West  62
(as Peter Stewart)
PDC
1-14-40
(38299)
Ben Judell Producers Pictures Corp.
(filmed 1939)
Bobby Clark
1940 Texas Renegades  59
(as Peter Stewart)
PDC
1-17-40
(38332)
6020 Ben Judell Producers Pictures Corp.
(filmed 1939)
Tim McCoy

The Sagebrush Family Trails West and Texas Renegades were filmed back-to-back at a studio Producers Pictures Corporation had built at Granite Dells in Prescott, Arizona, with Bert Sternbach as its general manager. The company, then using the Grand National Studios, announced 24 pictures would be filmed at the plant but only these were made, the results of a financial crisis that would see the cash-stricken firm reorganized as Producers Releasing Corporation, with Ben Judell ousted as president and Pathe Laboratories and a co-op of independent exchanges holding the purse strings.

Film Daily, August 30, 1939: Producers Pictures Planning Studio at Prescott, Ariz. Producers Pictures has purchased a site adjacent to Prescott, Ariz., where studio sound stages, western street and permanent sets are being erected for filming of outdoor action pictures. Location is considered ideal for the production of westerns. In addition to facilities for shooting, an administration building and suitable living quarters for production personnel, executives, actors and technicians are being built under supervision of Robert [Bert] Sternbach, from plans by Art Director Fred Preble.

Film Daily, February 26, 1940: Ben Judell Retires; Franchise Holders to Join in Financing. Producers Distributing Corp. and Producers Pictures Corp. are being completely reorganized. Ben Judell, founder and president, has retired from the organization and Harry Rathner, former franchise holder in New York, is slated to head the reorganized companies. Pathe, the principal creditor, will be active in the operation of the company.

Film Daily, March 20, 1940: Reorganization Completed on Former Judell Company. Producers Distributing Corp. becomes Producers Releasing Corp. under the reorganization of the companies formerly headed by Ben Judell. The production organization will be headed by Sigmund Neufeld and will be known as Sigmund Neufeld Productions.

Motion Picture Daily, March 21, 1940: Neufeld Takes Over Producers Pictures. Hollywood, March 20.—Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc., has been organized here to take over the production obligations of the defunct Producers Pictures Corp. The company will start shooting March 27 on a schedule of 15 pictures, of which eight will be westerns.

Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc., comprised—as listed in 1945—Sigmund as president, Stanley Neufeld (Sig's son) as vice-president, Sam Newfield as secretary, and Ruth Newfield (Sig's wife) as treasurer. With the creation of the reorganized Producers Releasing Corp., Sigmund Neufeld Productions would simply become a “production affiliate,” one of a number of production units used by PRC. Harry Rathner, Ben Judell's successor, was the initial president of Sigmund Neufeld Productions.

Sigmund was associate producer on all seven of the films produced by Ben Judell. Typical of the early days of the sound era in Hollywood, where the studio chief would often receive first producer credit, Sigmund was in charge of all production under Judell.

Film Daily, April 3, 1940: Producers Releasing Corp. Incorporates in New York. Producers Releasing Corp., successor to Producers Distributing Corp., has been incorporated as a New York organization. Capital is listed at 1,000 shares of no par value stock. Incorporators are Robert S. Benjamin, Seymour Peyser and Sidney Freidberg.

After Texas Renegades was completed in late December 1939, productions by the company ceased and resumed by mid-April 1940.

PRC

1940 I Take This Oath  66
(as Sherman Scott)
PRC
5-20-40
(38695)
6270 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Gordon Jones

The first production of PRC, filmed at the International Studios. The first nine features of PRC were made by Sigmund Neufeld Productions, before other unit producers were brought on board late in the year. PRC initially listed their studio at 1033 North Cahuenga Avenue and then 6404 Hollywood Boulevard, in the Creque Building, but most would be filmed at the Talisman and Fine Arts studios, augmented by the International and Chadwick studios.

1940 Am I Guilty?  71 Supreme
9-27-40
(39226)
6366 A.W. Hackel Supreme Pictures Corp. Ralph Cooper

Sam directs his second “all-colored” feature which, according to The California Eagle, started production on April 24, 1940. Besides producing Am I Guilty?, A.W. Hackel's Supreme Pictures also produced and released two shorts, One Big Mistake and Mr. Smith Goes Ghost, starring Pigmeat Markham. See the shorts section.

Ralph Cooper, the star of Am I Guilty?, was vice-president of Supreme at this time, which had plans for ten more featurettes with Markham. The film was reissued in 1944 by Toddy Pictures as Racket Doctor.

1940 Frontier Crusader  62
(as Peter Stewart)
PRC
6-15-40
(38781)
6297 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Tim McCoy
1940 Hold That Woman!  64
(as Sherman Scott)
PRC
6-28-40
(38869)
6368 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
James Dunn
1940 Billy the Kid Outlawed  52
(as Peter Stewart)
PRC
7-20-40
(39019)
6459 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Bob Steele
(Billy the Kid series)
1940 Gun Code  54
(as Peter Stewart)
PRC
8-3-40
(39036)
6466 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Tim McCoy
1940 Marked Men  66
(as Sherman Scott)
PRC
8-28-40
(39172)
6522 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Warren Hull
1940 Arizona Gang Busters  57
(as Peter Stewart)
PRC
9-16-40
(39262)
6589 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Tim McCoy
1940 Billy the Kid in Texas  53
(as Peter Stewart)
PRC
9-30-40
(39361)
6629 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Bob Steele
(Billy the Kid series)
1940 Riders of Black Mountain  57
(as Peter Stewart)
PRC
11-11-40
(39492)
6741 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Tim McCoy
1940 Billy the Kid's Gun Justice   62
(as Peter Stewart)
PRC
12-27-40
(39748)
6880 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Bob Steele
(Billy the Kid series)
1941 Billy the Kid's Range War  57
(as Peter Stewart)
PRC
1-24-41
(39978)
6922 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
(filmed 1940)
Bob Steele
(Billy the Kid series)
1941 The Lone Rider Rides On  61 PRC
1-10-41
(39813)
6953 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
(filmed 1940)
George Houston
(Lone Rider series)
1941 The Lone Rider Crosses the Rio  58 PRC
2-28-41
(40043)
7017 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
George Houston
(Lone Rider series)
1941 Outlaws of the Rio Grande  53
(as Peter Stewart)
PRC
3-7-41
(40044)
7060 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Tim McCoy
1941 Billy the Kid's Fighting Pals  62
(as Sherman Scott)
PRC
4-18-41
(40288)
6968 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Bob Steele
(Billy the Kid series)
1941 The Lone Rider in Ghost Town  64 PRC
5-16-41
(40416)
7280 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
George Houston
(Lone Rider series)
1941 The Texas Marshal  58
(as Peter Stewart)
PRC
6-13-41
(40469)
7325 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Tim McCoy
1941 Billy the Kid in Santa Fe  63
(as Sherman Scott)
PRC
7-11-41
(40728)
7443 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Bob Steele
(Billy the Kid series)
1941 The Lone Rider in Frontier Fury  61 PRC
8-8-41
(40798)
7497 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
George Houston
(Lone Rider series)
1941 The Lone Rider Ambushed  63 PRC
8-29-41
(40866)
7558 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
George Houston
(Lone Rider series)
1941 Billy the Kid Wanted  64
(as Sherman Scott)
PRC
10-3-41
(41030)
7686 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy the Kid series)
1941 The Lone Rider Fights Back  64 PRC
10-17-41
(41074)
7717 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
George Houston
(Lone Rider series)
1941 Billy the Kid's Round-Up  58
(as Sherman Scott)
PRC
11-21-41
(41254)
7790 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy the Kid series)

Film Daily, January 22, 1942: Neufeld's PRC Unit Space In the Chadwick Studios. Sigmund Neufeld, producer of westerns for PRC, has leased a unit of the Chadwick Studios in Hollywood, according to announcement by O. Henry Briggs, president of PRC. A new building is now being constructed for Neufeld's exclusive use.

Film Daily, April 10, 1942: PRC to Become Pathe in May? Announcement of the change of name of Producers Releasing Corporation to that of Pathe is expected to be made at PRC's national convention which opens here May 4. PRC is now wholly owned by Pathe. (The change of name did not occur of course.)

Film Daily, September 4, 1942: PRC, Expanding, Moves Into Talisman Sept. 15. PRC will move its Hollywood headquarters to Talisman Studios from 1440 N. Gower St. [Chadwick Studios], on Sept. 15, expansion plans demanding more space. PRC will continue to use its studio at 1440 N. Gower St. as well as the Talisman lot.

Motion Picture Daily, October 1, 1942: PRC Discusses Deal For Talisman Studio. Hollywood, Sept. 30.—Producers Releasing Corp. is negotiating with the L.A. Young interests for purchase of the Talisman Studios, it was disclosed today. PRC took occupancy of the studio two weeks ago in order to obtain more space.

Motion Picture Daily, December 31, 1942: $50,000 Loss in Coast Studio Fire. Hollywood, Dec. 30.—Los Angeles arson investigators are probing a fire of undetermined origin which destroyed a dock scene at Talisman studios last night with an estimated damage of $50,000. No production by independent producers who rent the lot will be hindered, it was said. Producers Releasing makes virtually all its pictures there.

1941 Texas Manhunt  60
(as Peter Stewart)
PRC
12-12-41
(41333)
7849 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Bill 'Cowboy Rambler' Boyd
(Texas Marshal series)
1941 The Lone Rider and the Bandit  54 PRC
12-26-41
(41430)
7917 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
George Houston
(Lone Rider series)
1942 Raiders of the West  60
(as Peter Stewart)
PRC
2-13-42
(41500)
7969 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
(filmed 1941)
Bill 'Cowboy Rambler' Boyd
(Texas Marshal series)
1942 Billy the Kid Trapped  59
(as Sherman Scott)
PRC
2-20-42
(41567)
8019 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
(filmed 1941)
Buster Crabbe
(Billy the Kid series)
1942 The Lone Rider in Cheyenne  59 PRC
3-20-42
(41701)
Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
George Houston
(Lone Rider series)
1942 Rolling Down the Great Divide  59
(as Peter Stewart)
PRC
4-24-42
(41934)
8283 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Bill 'Cowboy Rambler' Boyd
(Texas Marshal series)
1942 The Mad Monster  77 PRC
5-22-42
(41983)
8264 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Johnny Downs
1942 Billy the Kid's Smoking Guns  58
(as Sherman Scott)
PRC
5-15-42
(42073)
8302 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy the Kid series)
1942 The Lone Rider in Texas Justice  58 PRC
6-12-42
(42097)
8375 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
George Houston
(Lone Rider series)
1942 Tumbleweed Trail  55
(as Peter Stewart)
PRC
7-10-42
(42140)
8406 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Bill 'Cowboy Rambler' Boyd
(Texas Marshal series)
1942 Jungle Siren  67 PRC
8-21-42
(42276)
8562 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Ann Corio
1942 Law and Order  57
(as Sherman Scott)
PRC
8-28-42
(42417)
8585 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy the Kid series)
1942 Sheriff of Sage Valley  56
(as Sherman Scott)
PRC
10-2-42
(42724)
8595 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy the Kid series)
1942 Along the Sundown Trail  58
(as Peter Stewart)
PRC
10-19-42
(42752)
8669 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Bill 'Cowboy Rambler' Boyd
(Texas Marshal series)
1942 Prairie Pals  60
(as Peter Stewart)
PRC
9-11-42
(42731)
8668 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Bill 'Cowboy Rambler' Boyd
(Texas Marshal series)
1942 Border Roundup  58 PRC
9-18-42
(42603)
8722 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
George Houston
(Lone Rider series)
1942 Outlaws of Boulder Pass  60 PRC
10-28-42
(42721)
8350 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
George Houston
(Lone Rider series)
1943 Dead Men Walk  66 PRC
2-10-43
(43072)
8827 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
(filmed 1942)
George Zucco
1942 The Mysterious Rider  54
(as Sherman Scott)
PRC
11-20-42
(42894)
8866 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy the Kid series)
1943 Queen of Broadway  64 PRC
3-8-43
(43234)
8893 Bert Sternbach Producers Releasing Corp.
S & N Productions, Inc.
(filmed 1942)
Rochelle Hudson

S & N Productions, Inc. was based at PRC, with Bert Sternbach as president, Violet Newfield (Sam's wife) as vice-president and Sam as secretary-treasurer.

1942 Overland Stagecoach  58 PRC
12-11-42
(43059)
8914 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Bob Livingston
(Lone Rider series)
1943 The Kid Rides Again  55
(as Sherman Scott)
PRC
1-27-43
(43080)
8999 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
(filmed 1942)
Buster Crabbe
(Billy the Kid series)
1943 Fugitive of the Plains  56 PRC
3-12-43
(43364)
9023 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
(filmed 1942)
Buster Crabbe
(Billy the Kid series)
1943 Wild Horse Rustlers  56 PRC
2-12-43
(43365)
9074 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
(filmed 1942)
Bob Livingston
(Lone Rider series)

Around this time Sam receives an additional dialogue credit for Edgar G. Ulmer's My Son, the Hero, made for PRC by Atlantis Pictures Corp.

1943 Western Cyclone  60 PRC
5-14-43
(43741)
9134 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy the Kid series)
1943 The Black Raven  61 PRC
5-31-43
(43793)
9170 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
George Zucco
1943 Death Rides the Plains  55 PRC
5-7-43
(43925)
9250 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Bob Livingston
(Lone Rider series)
1943 The Renegades  58 PRC
7-1-43
(44033)
9130 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy the Kid series)

Although the on-screen and copyright title is The Renegades, the film was advertized as The Renegade.

1943 Blazing Frontier  59 PRC
9-1-43
(44449)
9339 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy the Kid series)
1943 Wolves of the Range  60 PRC
6-21-43
(44144)
9391 Sigmund Neufeld Producers Releasing Corp.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Bob Livingston
(Lone Rider series)

Film Daily, May 14, 1943:[Leon] Fromkess said that PRC shortly would announce the acquisition of its own studio, bringing all the production units under one roof instead of splitting the shooting among three different lots.

Film Daily, May 17, 1943: PRC Takes Lease on Fine Arts Studio. Contracts under which PRC will take a long-term lease on the Fine Arts Studio on Santa Monica Boulevard will be signed early this week and the company will move into its new quarters from the Talisman Studio late this month.

Film Daily, August 23, 1943: Hollywood Fine Arts Plant Bought by PRC. O. Henry Briggs, PRC president, announced Friday the purchase by PRC from Weco Corp., subsidiary of Western Electric, of its entire mortgage interest in the Fine Arts Studio property in Hollywood. The deal was an “all cash” transaction, Briggs said.

Film Daily, August 30, 1943: Rename Studio for PRC. Name of Fine Arts Studio will be changed to PRC Studio when PRC Pictures, Inc., moves into the Santa Monica Boulevard plant late next month. No change in personnel at the studio is contemplated, Fromkess states.

Film Daily, September 8, 1943: Chadwick Equipment to PRC. PRC has purchased all equipment in the Chadwick studio on Gower St. and will install it in Fine Arts studio, which the company recently acquired. Equipment includes electrical fixtures, generators, sets and flats. Deal was made by PRC with I.E. Chadwick. The company will move into the Fine Arts studio late this month and change name of the lot to PRC.

Film Daily, September 22, 1943: PRC Acquires Fine Art Studio for $305,000. With a bid of $305, 000 in cash, exclusive of taxes, PRC formally acquired the Fine Art Studio, outbidding Columbia, which offered $300,000 plus $33,000 for back taxes, at a court sale Tuesday. The company will take possession Oct. 1.

Film Daily, October 14, 1943: PRC Buy Fine Arts Studio Equipment. PRC has purchased for $60,000 cash all the electrical equipment, sets, flats and other appurtenances of the old Fine Arts Studio which property the company recently acquired.

At this time the studio was named Fine Arts after Fine Arts Pictures, headed by Franklyn Warner who leased the Grand National (Educational) Studios in 1940 with intent to produce a program of 42 features, none of which were apparently made (excluding his previous features for Grand National and RKO). The studio would operate as a rental plant before being purchased by PRC. Columbia, outbid for the Fine Arts Studio, would instead purchase the Chadwick Studio and Talisman Studio around the same time.

1943 Danger! Women at Work  60 PRC
8-23-43
(44032)
9403 Jack Schwarz PRC Pictures, Inc.
Jack Schwarz Productions
Patsy Kelly
1943 Cattle Stampede  57 PRC
8-16-43
(44258)
9446 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy the Kid series)
1943 Tiger Fangs  58 PRC
9-10-43
(44223)
9442 Jack Schwarz PRC Pictures, Inc.
Jack Schwarz Productions
Frank Buck

While Tiger Fangs was being lensed, Sig produced Law of the Saddle for PRC, starring Bob Livingston in the Lone Rider series, directed by Melville De Lay.

1943 Raiders of Red Gap  57 PRC
9-30-43
(44716)
9815 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Bob Livingston
(Lone Rider series)
1943 Harvest Melody  71 PRC
11-22-43
(44379)
9561 Walter Colmes PRC Pictures, Inc.
Walter Colmes Productions
Rosemary Lane

Sam Newfield photo

Newfield (right) on the set of Harvest Melody

1943 Devil Riders  57 PRC
11-5-43
(44663)
9619 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy Carson series)

Film Daily, August 24, 1943: Exit Billy the Kid. PRC has decided to drop the title, “Billy the Kid,” describing its Western series starring Buster Crabbe, and instead will label the group as the “Buster Crabbe Series.” Move eliminates any suggestion of gangsterism or outlawism.

Noted in the trades as the Buster Crabbe series and on accessories as King of the Wild West, the character's name was changed to Billy Carson.

1943 The Drifter  61 PRC
12-20-43
(44922)
9723 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy Carson series)
1944 Nabonga Gorilla  71 PRC
1-25-44
(44697)
9749 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
(filmed 1943)
Buster Crabbe

Although usually referred to simply as Nabonga, the actual title is Nabonga Gorilla. Released in Los Angeles as The Girl and the Gorilla.

1944 Frontier Outlaws  57 PRC
3-4-44
(44981)
9909 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy Carson series)
1944 Thundering Gun Slingers  58 PRC
3-25-44
(45188)
9941 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy Carson series)
1944 The Monster Maker  62 PRC
4-15-44
(45076)
9968 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
J. Carrol Naish
1944 The Contender  63 PRC
5-10-44
(45210)
10026 Bert Sternbach PRC Pictures, Inc.
S & N Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
1944 Valley of Vengeance  56 PRC
5-5-44
(45334)
10048 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy Carson series)
1944 Fuzzy Settles Down  59 PRC
7-25-44
(45536)
10137 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy Carson series)
1944 Rustler's Hideout  59 PRC
9-12-44
(45607)
10161 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy Carson series)
1944 Swing Hostess  74 PRC
9-8-44
(45657)
10210 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Martha Tilton
1944 I Accuse My Parents  68 PRC
11-4-44
(45947)
10353 Max Alexander PRC Pictures, Inc.
Alexander-Stern Productions, Inc.
Mary Beth Hughes
1944 Wild Horse Phantom  55 PRC
10-28-44
(45919)
10359 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy Carson series)
1944 Oath of Vengeance  56 PRC
12-9-44
(46103)
10408 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy Carson series)
1945 His Brother's Ghost  54 PRC
2-3-45
(46277)
10496 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
(filmed 1944)
Buster Crabbe
(Billy Carson series)
1945 The Kid Sister  55 PRC
2-6-45
(46357)
10529 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
(filmed 1944)
Roger Pryor
1945 Shadows of Death  59 PRC
4-19-45
(46803)
10601 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
(filmed 1944)
Buster Crabbe
(Billy Carson series)
1945 Gangster's Den  59 PRC
6-14-45
(46960)
10684 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy Carson series)
1945 The Lady Confesses  64 PRC
5-16-45
(46793)
10783 Alfred Stern PRC Pictures, Inc.
Alexander-Stern Productions, Inc.
Mary Beth Hughes
1945 Apology for Murder  66 PRC
8-27-45
(47187)
10788 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Ann Savage
1945 White Pongo  74 PRC
7-9-45
(47179)
10869 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Richard Fraser
1945 Stagecoach Outlaws  58 PRC
8-17-45
(47107)
10914 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy Carson series)
1945 Border Badmen  59 PRC
10-10-45
(47243)
10973 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy Carson series)
1945 Fighting Bill Carson  52 PRC
10-31-45
(47365)
10980 Sigmund Neufeld

PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.

Buster Crabbe
(Billy Carson series)
1946 The Flying Serpent  59
(as Sherman Scott)
PRC
2-20-46
(47870)
11149 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
(filmed 1945)
George Zucco
1945 Prairie Rustlers  55 PRC
11-7-45
(47485)
11170 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy Carson series)
1946 Lightning Raiders  61 PRC
1-7-46
(47695)
11218 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
(filmed 1945)
Buster Crabbe
(Billy Carson series)

Completed in early October, Sam now goes to the East to lens some films for Ted Toddy, returning to Hollywood to start Murder Is My Business in mid-December 1945.

1946 Mantan Messes Up  48   **
(as John Reese?)
Toddy
2-10-46
(48188)
Ted Toddy Lucky Star Production Co.
(filmed 1945)
Mantan Moreland
1946 House-Rent Party  63 Toddy
3-10-46
(48186)
Ted Toddy Toddy Pictures Co.
(filmed 1945)
Pigmeat Markham
1946 Fight That Ghost  62 Toddy
4-10-46
(48187)
Ted Toddy Toddy Pictures Co.
(filmed 1945)
Pigmeat Markham

Toddy Pictures Company was a distributor and producer specializing in “race” pictures, headed by Ted Toddy who had years of experience in the distribution business, first with Universal in New York and then Columbia in New Orleans and Atlanta, where he was southern division manager of public relations, publicity and exploitation. Resigning from Columbia in 1935, Toddy ventured into production, initially with a travelogue and then an exploiter titled Polygamy. In early 1940 he partnered with producer Jed Buell to create Dixie National Pictures, using Toddy's experience in the south to handle—through its distribution arm, Dixie National Films—the “all-colored” films made by the company.

By early 1941 Toddy had organized Consolidated National Film Exchanges with John Jenkins of Million Dollar Productions, another company producing all-colored films, to distribute the product of both companies, with plans to produce in the East. Toddy would soon absorb Dixie National and Million Dollar into Toddy Pictures, the company now well-established with exchanges in key “all-colored” territories, catering to the ever-growing number of “Negro” theaters—410 in 1943 and 600 by early 1947.

Motion Picture Daily, November 21, 1945: Sam Newfield, Hollywood director now in New York with Toddy Pictures is now shooting his first feature in the East. This is an all-colored cast, headed by “Pigmeat” Alamo Markham. Newfield will direct four Markham pictures a year. He is under contract to Toddy.

Film Daily, November 23, 1945: Toddy to Make Colored Features in the East. Toddy Pictures has signed Sam Newfield to direct an all-colored cast feature at the Ideal Studios here. Cast will be headed by Pigmeat Alamo Markham. Newfield has made four features for Toddy in Hollywood.

Showmen's Trade Review, November 24, 1945: Newfield Directing Negro Feature. Sam Newfield has been signed by Toddy Pictures to direct an all-colored cast feature now being made in the east with a 60-people cast headed by Pigmeat Alamo Markham. Newfield has already made four features for Toddy in Hollywood, three of them with Markham.

Film Daily, November 28, 1945: Sig Neufeld, PRC producer, has just completed a Negro feature here [“the East”] for Toddy Pictures Corp. and starts another today.

Film Daily, December 5, 1945: Toddy Signs Markham. Ted Toddy, president of Toddy Pictures, announced yesterday the signing of Pigmeat Alamo Markham for four Negro cast features. The first one tentatively titled, “House Rent Party,” was completed last week.

Based on these news items, House-Rent Party (the “first one,” probably actually produced by Sigmund Neufeld) was completed late November 1945, at Ideal Studios, Hudson Heights, New Jersey, immediately followed by Fight That Ghost. Both share most of the same production crew.

Film Daily, February 4, 1946: Toddy Pictures Weighs Expanded Production. In addition to the already announced 10 features on the 1946 program of Toddy Pictures Co., producers and distributors of Negro films, the company is contemplating six Negro musical westerns, one Negro serial and a weekly release of the Negro News Review. Three 1946 features are already completed and will be available in February. These are “House-Rent Party,” with Pigmeat Markham; “Mantan Messes Up” with Mantan Moreland, and “Fight That Ghost” with Pigmeat Markham. Sam Newfield directed the trio.

Based on the news item above, Sam Newfield directed Mantan Messes Up. However, the 1946 Boxoffice Barometer listed the film as being directed by John Reese. The evidence suggests that this was another alias for Sam Newfield.

The production timeline of Mantan Messes Up is unknown, but I suspect it may have been filmed before House-Rent Party and Fight That Ghost. Mantan Moreland was on the East Coast at this time to make Bud Pollard's Tall, Tan and Terrific for Astor Productions, Inc., which began lensing October 30, 1945, at American Studios, Fort Lee, New Jersey. Monte Hawley, co-starring in Mantan Messes Up, was also in Tall, Tan and Terrific.

The IMDb lists the credits for the film as if someone had viewed a print: produced by Jed Buell, Ted Toddy as executive producer, and cinematography by Jack Greenhalgh; running time, 62 minutes. If these credits are to be believed, the film was likely made on the West Coast. The 1946 Boxoffice Barometer listed the running time as 48 minutes, whereas the AFI Catalog says 43 minutes “with eliminations.”

All three films were submitted for censorship review in New York at the same time, perhaps evidence they were made back-to-back.

Film Daily, March 18, 1947: Three New Toddy Releases. Toddy Pictures Co. has three new Negro features ready for release. Titles are “What a Guy,” “Mantan Runs for Mayor” and “Return of Mandy's Husband.”

The production company for Mantan Messes Up was Lucky Star Production Co., referenced on accessories as Lucky Star Productions. The company also made the three titles listed above, all starring Mantan Moreland. Little is known about these films, but the 1947 Boxoffice Barometer sheds some rare light on who directed them: someone named A. Selah.

The release dates shown for the three Toddy titles are from the 1947 Film Daily Year Book. The 1946 Boxoffice Barometer listed the release dates of Mantan Messes Up, House-Rent Party and Fight That Ghost as May, July and June, respectively.

Newfield's first known “race” picture was in 1937, Harlem on the Prairie, followed by Am I Guilty? in 1940, both re-issued by Toddy as it did with so many “all-colored” films. But Toddy was not involved in the actual productions.

In 1940, while Producers Pictures was being reorganized and production had temporarily stopped, the Neufelds' production unit made the “all-colored” Mr. Washington Goes to Town for Toddy's Dixie National Pictures. Jed Buell was credited as both producer and director, but the film was directed by William Beaudine who did not want credit.

The Neufelds' unit, which had made the initial films for Producers Pictures, was comprised of Jack Greenhalgh, cameraman; Fred Preble, art director; Hans Weeren; soundman; and Bert Sternbach, production manager.

This might explain why, in part, Film Daily mentioned Newfield had made four features previously for Toddy in Hollywood. The other two were probably the shorts—“featurettes” on advertising material—One Big Mistake and Mr. Smith Goes Ghost, both starring Pigmeat Markham, which Newfield directed in 1940, and released in the compilation featurette, Pigmeat Markham's Laugh Hepcats.

Toddy Pictures did have a small Hollywood studio, initially shared with Cathedral Films whose product was distributed by Toddy exchanges. The studio was listed in the Welden Building at 6404 Sunset Boulevard, operating until the late 1940s.

Whether director A. Selah was another alias for Sam Newfield, however unlikely, will probably never be known.

1946 Murder Is My Business  64 PRC
4-10-46
(48117)
11377 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
(filmed 1945)
Hugh Beaumont
(Michael Shayne series)
1946 Gentlemen With Guns  52 PRC
3-27-46
(48116)
11433 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy Carson series)
1946 Terrors on Horseback  55 PRC
5-1-46
(48719)
11413 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy Carson series)
1946 Larceny in Her Heart  68 PRC
7-10-46
(48485)
11546 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Hugh Beaumont
(Michael Shayne series)
1946 Queen of Burlesque  67 PRC
7-24-46
(48566)
11651 Arthur Alexander
Alfred Stern
PRC Pictures, Inc.
Alexander-Stern Productions, Inc.
Evelyn Ankers
1946 Ghost of Hidden Valley  57 PRC
6-3-46
(48486)
11654 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy Carson series)
1946 Blonde for a Day  67 PRC
7-29-46
(48565)
11697 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Hugh Beaumont
(Michael Shayne series)
1946 Prairie Badmen  55 PRC
7-17-46
(48595)
11775 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy Carson series)
1946 Overland Riders  55 PRC
8-21-46
(48852)
11790 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy Carson series)
1946 Outlaws of the Plains  56 PRC
9-22-46
(48908)
11806 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Buster Crabbe
(Billy Carson series)

Sam's last western for PRC, filmed back-to-back with Overland Riders. The AFI Catalog says Outlaws of the Plains was filmed in early January but production began on June 13, 1946. From April 1940 to June 1946, Newfield directed 99 feature films—all but four for PRC. On April 24, 1946, PRC Studios officially became Eagle Lion Studios, with Sig Neufeld's agreement to use the plant expiring at the end of August. By mid-August 1947, PRC was completely absorbed by Eagle Lion Films, a process which had started a year earlier.

1947 Jungle Flight  67
(as Peter Stewart)
Paramount
8-22-47
(49515)
12212 William H. Pine
William C. Thomas
Pine-Thomas Productions, Inc.
(filmed 1946)
Robert Lowery

William H. Pine and William C. Thomas were based out of the PRC Studios since 1941, when it was known as Fine Arts, releasing through Paramount, moving to Nassour Studios in mid-1946 although still using what was now called the Eagle Lion Studios for Jungle Flight and, likely, Adventure Island. (Note that Jungle Flight and Adventure Island are in circulation crediting Metropolis Productions on TV prints, but this was a holding company for the 35-film Pine-Thomas library which was first released to TV in 1957.)

1946 Gas House Kids  68 PRC
10-28-46
(48976)
11867 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Robert Lowery
1946 Lady Chaser  58 PRC
11-25-46
(49169)
12022 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Robert Lowery
1947 Adventure Island  67 Cinecolor
(as Peter Stewart)
Paramount
10-10-47
(49832)
William H. Pine
William C. Thomas
Pine-Thomas Productions, Inc.
(filmed 1946)
Rory Calhoun

Newfield's first color film, with one of the longest shooting schedules in his career: 19 days, using a cast and crew of 147 filming at Catalina Island.

1947 Three on a Ticket  62 PRC
4-5-47
(49609)
12058 Sigmund Neufeld PRC Pictures, Inc.
Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
(filmed 1946)
Hugh Beaumont
(Michael Shayne series)

Sam's last film for PRC, filmed in 12 days at the Sutherland Studios in October 1946. Although produced just before the Motion Picture Daily news item below, Gas House Kids and Lady Chaser were also filmed at the Sutherland Studios where Sig Neufeld had set up offices by mid-July 1946.

Motion Picture Daily, September 25, 1946: PRC Pictures In Sutherland Studio. Hollywood, Sept. 24.—PRC Pictures will use the facilities of Sutherland Studio, here, through an arrangement just completed by Belmont S. Gottlieb, studio production executive. Sigmund Neufeld will film the first in his new series of Michael Shayne pictures on the Sutherland lot, starting Oct. 1, as the initial production under the new lease. The new Michael Shayne series will again have Hugh Beaumont in the title role. PRC's former studio headquarters were taken over by Eagle-Lion.

In April 1946, PRC re-issued a number of Newfield's previous PRC product as 40-minute streamliners known as “Bronco Buckaroos”: Code of the Plains (culled from The Renegades), Frontier Fighters (culled from Western Cyclone), Panhandle Trail (culled from The Mysterious Rider), and Raiders of Red Rock (culled from Fugitive of the Plains).

After making Three on a Ticket, Sam's directorial work slowed considerably for a time. He was known to have started helming a 15-chapter Columbia serial on May 12, 1947, The Sea Hound, produced by Sam Katzman's Esskay Pictures, Inc. A few days into the production, Newfield was badly injured when he tripped and fell through an engine hatch on a schooner at Catalina Island. By September 1947 he was back at work directing The Counterfeiters, his only known film lensed in 1947.

1948 The Counterfeiters  73
(as Peter Stewart)
20th Century-Fox
5-4-48
(51420)
12903 Maurice H. Conn Fortune Film Corp.
(A Reliance Picture)
(filmed 1947)
John Sutton

Film Daily, September 24, 1947: First major company to embark on a program of low budget features is 20th-Fox which, it is learned, plans to distribute at least 21 pictures to be made off the lot by independent producers, with budgets ranging as low as $110,000 per feature.

Made off the lot in this case would be the Nassour Studios.

1948 Money Madness  73
(as Peter Stewart)
Film Classics
4-15-48
(51344)
12950 Sigmund Neufeld Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc. Hugh Beaumont

Film Daily, April 8, 1948: Sigmund Neufeld Pictures, Inc., has been chartered at Sacramento with Neufeld as prexy, Karl Herzog of Film Classics and Cinecolor as secretary-treasurer, and Monte Livingston, film attorney, as vice-prexy. Company will produce for FC release, with “Miraculous Journey” as first pic. Neufeld made “Money Madness” for FC release May 15.

Film Classics, Inc., founded by George A. Hirliman in 1943, was a distributor of re-issues which later handled independent productions. In late 1947 the company became a subsidiary of Cinecolor, and Sam would lens four films using the process with Film Classics distributing two of them. The company, headquartered at the Nassour Studios, merged with Eagle Lion Films, Inc., in June 1950 to become Eagle Lion Classics, Inc., which was taken over by United Artists in April 1951.

1948 Lady at Midnight  60
(as Sherman Scott)
Eagle Lion
8-15-48
(51956)
13068 John Sutherland John Sutherland Productions, Inc. Richard Denning

John Sutherland was an independent producer of shorts, cartoons, industrial and institutional films, with his own studio in Hollywood, sometimes referred to as Morey-Sutherland Studios, after Morey and Sutherland Productions, Inc. The studio was used by Jessie L. Lasky and other pioneer producers, remodeled during the war and enlarged soon after. Sam lensed a number of films at the plant, beginning with Gas House Kids and then Lady Chaser, Three on a Ticket, Money Madness, Lady at Midnight, Miraculous Journey, The Strange Mrs. Crane, and Radar Secret Service.

1948 Miraculous Journey  83 (76) Cinecolor
(as Peter Stewart)
Film Classics
9-1-48
(52036)
13070 Sigmund Neufeld Sigmund Neufeld Pictures, Inc. Rory Calhoun
1948 The Strange Mrs. Crane  60
(as Sherman Scott)
Eagle Lion
12-18-48
(52131)
13258 John Sutherland John Sutherland Productions, Inc. Marjorie Lord
1949 State Department File 649  88 Cinecolor
(as Peter Stewart)
Film Classics
2-15-49
(52579)
13402 Sigmund Neufeld Sigmund Neufeld Pictures, Inc.
(filmed 1948)
Virginia Bruce

Filmed at the Nassour Studios and budgeted at $750,000, this was probably Sam's most expensive film. On the other end of the scale, Harlem on the Prairie (1937) cost $5,600 according to Maceo Sheffield, the actor who was also involved as the film's production supervisor.

1949 Wild Weed  90 (uncut)
(as Sherman Scott)
Eureka
7-14-49
(53633)
Richard Kay Franklin Productions, Inc. Alan Baxter

Purchased by Hallmark Productions and initially re-released in 1950 as The Devil's Weed (the film's working title) and then by January 1951, heavily cut, as She Shoulda Said 'NO'! Shot in seven days at Hal Roach Studios, the film was refused a PCA certificate. In the UK the film, under the title Devil's Weed, was banned in 1950 by the British Board of Film Censors. The distributor listed is New York-based Eureka Productions, aka Jewel Productions.

1950 Radar Secret Service  59 Lippert
1-28-50
(54016)
14287 Barney A. Sarecky Lippert Productions, Inc.
(filmed 1949)
John Howard

Lippert Pictures was an independent producer and distributor whose origins go back to the post-war Screen Guild company. In February 1949, Screen Guild and Lippert Pictures merged, to be known as the latter. Some of Newfield's work for the company, five lensed by his longtime cinematographer, Jack Greenhalgh, were made under the names Mayflower Productions, Spartan Productions and Tom Productions—all subsidiaries of Lippert, the corporate names more for tax reasons than anything else.

Not operating a studio per se (space was rented), Lippert Pictures operated until 1955, when Robert L. Lippert ceased distribution—helming the odd production himself—and moved to oversee Regal Films, an autonomous budget unit at 20th Century-Fox.

1950 Western Pacific Agent  62 Lippert
3-17-50
(54221)
14335 Sigmund Neufeld Sigmund Neufeld Pictures, Inc.
Lippert Productions, Inc.
(filmed 1949)
Kent Taylor
1950 Motor Patrol  66 Lippert
6-16-50
(54488)
14469 Barney A. Sarecky Lippert Productions, Inc. Don Castle
1950 Hi-Jacked  66 Lippert
7-14-50
(54731)
14613 Sigmund Neufeld Sigmund Neufeld Pictures, Inc.
Lippert Productions, Inc.
Jim Davis
1951 Skipalong Rosenbloom  72 Eagle Lion Classics †
4-21-51
(55576)
14888 Wally Kline Wally Kline Enterprises, Inc.
(filmed 1950)
Maxie Rosenbloom

So-named after Film Classics was absorbed by Eagle Lion in June 1950. At the time of this film's release, in April 1951, Eagle Lion had just merged with United Artists, whose banner this film flew under (re-released independently in 1953 as Square Shooter).

Filmed at the Nassour Studios—renamed KTTV when it was sold in May 1950—where Sam directed most of the Lippert and AFRC films using the Sigmund Neufeld Pictures unit.

1951 Three Desperate Men  69 Lippert
1-12-51
(55458)
14900 Sigmund Neufeld Sigmund Neufeld Pictures, Inc.
Mayflower Productions, Inc. [Lippert]
(filmed 1950)
Preston Foster
1951 Mask of the Dragon  54 Lippert
3-17-51
(55655)
15041 Sigmund Neufeld Sigmund Neufeld Pictures, Inc.
Spartan Productions, Inc. [Lippert]
(filmed 1950)
Richard Travis
1951 Fingerprints Don't Lie  56 Lippert
3-3-51
(55656)
15042 Sigmund Neufeld Sigmund Neufeld Pictures, Inc.
Spartan Productions, Inc. [Lippert]
(filmed 1950)
Richard Travis
1951 Lost Continent  83 Lippert
8-17-51
(56267)
15313 Sigmund Neufeld Sigmund Neufeld Pictures, Inc.
Tom Productions, Inc. [Lippert]
Cesar Romero
1951 Sky High  60 Lippert
9-21-51
(56473)
15390 Sigmund Neufeld Sigmund Neufeld Pictures, Inc.
Spartan Productions, Inc. [Lippert]
Sid Melton
1951 Leave It to the Marines  66 Lippert
9-28-51
(56462)
15389 Sigmund Neufeld Sigmund Neufeld Pictures, Inc.
Tom Productions, Inc. [Lippert]
Sid Melton
1952 Outlaw Women  75 Cinecolor
(co-director: Ron Ormond)
Lippert
6-2-52
(57263)
15745 Ron Ormond Howco Productions
(filmed 1951)
Marie Windsor

The first film produced by Howco Productions, formed by southern-based exhibitors J. Francis White and Joy Houck, later known has Howco International.

1952 Scotland Yard Inspector  78
UK title: Lady in the Fog  82
Lippert
10-3-52
(58028)
16099 Anthony Hinds Exclusive Films, Ltd. [Hammer Films]
Intercontinental Pictures
Lippert Productions, Inc.
Cesar Romero
1952 The Gambler and the Lady  72
(co-director: Patrick Jenkins [Pat Jackson])
Lippert
12-26-52
(58235)
16021 Anthony Hinds Exclusive Films, Ltd. [Hammer Films]
Intercontinental Pictures
Lippert Productions, Inc.
Dane Clark

Two of the many co-productions Lippert Pictures handled between 1952 and 1955 as part of a reciprocal agreement with the British distributor Exclusive Films, with Anthony Hinds and Michael Carreras producing at Hammer. The intial production agreement flew under the Intercontinental Pictures banner, with Lippert supplying the stories and American stars. Newfield's name does not appear on the UK release of The Gambler and the Lady, credited instead to Patrick Jenkins, a pseudonym for Pat Jackson (the US print shows both Newfield and Jenkins as directors). On the US print Pat Jenkins is credited as dialogue director on Scotland Yard Inspector.

Film Bulletin, October 6, 1952: This outfit's [Lippert's] releasing outlook took on new lustre with the announcement that Sig Neufeld will produce four feature films in England, for Lippert distribution. The pictures will feature American stars in original stories, to be produced under the Sig Neufeld Productions banner. Sam Newfield, who has been in England with the producer setting up details for production, has remained there to complete pre-production work on the first two films to be made under the commitment. Newfield will serve as director and active producer on the films.

The films announced above were never made.

Now working in television, Sam directs no feature films for a few years. Sigmund, without cinematographer Greenhalgh, who would now retire from features for television, goes on to produce Lippert's Ansco-colored Sins of Jezebel (1953) starring Paulette Goddard, directed by Reginald Le Borg.

1955 Thunder Over Sangoland  73 Lippert
4-8-55
(61512)
Rudolph C. Flothow Arrow Productions, Inc.
(filmed 1953)
Jon Hall

One of four features Lippert released theatrically in the US that were culled from the television series Ramar of the Jungle, produced by Arrow Productions, helmed by Leon Fromkess. In 1940, Fromkess, a former Monogram treasurer, was appointed as executive assistant to PRC Pictures president Harry Rathner, handling foreign and domestic distribution and exchange operations before becoming vice-president, under O. Henry Briggs, in 1941. The following year Fromkess became vice-president in charge of production, and in 1944 was appointed PRC president. Fromkess resigned from PRC in September 1945, to become a vice-president of the Samuel Goldwyn organization. In 1952, he formed Arrow Productions which was soon bought out by Television Programs of America (TPA), eventually becoming executive producer of all its subsequent series. Produced between June 1952 and early 1954, Newfield directed 13 episodes, beginning in July 1953, for the third season of Ramar of the Jungle—on the familiar ground of Eagle Lion Studios, formerly PRC Studios. Newfield's connection with Fromkess would see the director involved in three other TPA series.

The other three features, all produced by Arrow Productions were White Goddess (1953, directed by Wallace Fox), Eyes of the Jungle (1953, directed by Paul Landres) and Phantom of the Jungle (1955, directed by Spencer Gordon Bennet). All four films were shot with theatrical release in mind and then edited for television.

Newfield's only other known television work around this time was Television Programs of America's syndicated series Captain Gallant of the Foreign Legion, produced between late 1953 and late 1956, starring Buster Crabbe and Fuzzy Knight. Initially filmed on location in Morocco with interiors at the Neuilly Studios in Paris, complete with a permanent desert set, the series aired on NBC between 1955 and 1957. It was produced by Harry Saltzman and Serge Glykson's Telepictures of Morocco, Inc., with Frantel, Inc., founded in July 1953 by Saltzman, at the financial and, later, distribution end. Thirty-nine episodes were completed by the end of 1954, and production would later shift to Algerian exteriors and the Tisorno Studios in Tirennia, Italy, with the company renamed Carrara Film. Variety Weekly reported on March 31, 1954 that Sam Newfield had been assigned to direct the series, which saw production resume in April 1954. Jean Yarbrough was also involved in the chair, and in early September 1954, with 21 episodes completed so far, Yarbrough reoptioned for 13 more. The other directors for the first 39 episodes, according to Variety, were Marcel Cravenne and Pierre Schwab.

1955 Desert Outpost  67
(co-director: Marcel Cravenne)
Anglo Amalgamated
2-17-55
(not applicable)
Serge Glykson CGA [Carrara Film]
Telepictures of Morocco, Inc.
(filmed 1954)
Buster Crabbe

Culled from three episodes of the TV series Captain Gallant of the Foreign Legion, this film was released theatrically in the UK only.

1955 Last of the Desperados  71 AFRC
12-1-55
(62296)
17705 Sigmund Neufeld Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Associated Film Releasing Corp.
James Craig
1956 The Wild Dakotas  71 AFRC
2-28-56
(62682)
17877 Sigmund Neufeld Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Associated Film Releasing Corp.
(filmed 1955)
Bill Williams
1956 The Three Outlaws  74 SuperScope 235 AFRC
5-13-56
(62861)
17989 Sigmund Neufeld Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Associated Film Releasing Corp.
Neville Brand
1956 Frontier Gambler  70 AFRC
7-1-56
(63072)
18113 Sigmund Neufeld Sigmund Neufeld Productions, Inc.
Associated Film Releasing Corp.
John Bromfield

Formed in August 1955, Associated Film Releasing Corp. (AFRC) was a short-lived distributor, helmed by Lippert president (since late 1954) Edward J. Baumgarten, which besides these films also handled a couple of other independent westerns: Ron Ormond's Naked Gun and Richard Bartlett's Two-Gun Lady. AFRC also released one British co-production, Blonde Bait (Women Without Men), made by Anthony Hinds at Hammer. The company was created to fill the void left over when Lippert ceased distribution, AFRC using most of the company's franchised distributors. Like Lippert Productions, Inc., AFRC was based at the KTTV (Nassour) Studios. Baumgarten, who financed Newfield's four films, was also president of Regal Films, Inc., formed in June 1956. AFRC was later reactivated, the company's small library reissued in 1964.

Frontier Gambler, completed in early May 1956, was Newfield's last American-made feature.

1958 Wolf Dog  69 RegalScope 20th Century-Fox
6-8-58
(65021)
18786 Sam Newfield Regal Films (Canada), Ltd.
(filmed 1957)
Jim Davis
1958 Flaming Frontier  70 RegalScope 20th Century-Fox
8-1-58
(65165)
18846 Sam Newfield Regal Films (Canada), Ltd.
(filmed 1957)
Bruce Bennett

August 22–October 22, 1957: Newfield ends his feature film career completing principal photography on these two films, made back-to-back in Ontario for the Canadian counterpart of Regal Films.

Previous to this, from July 1956 to April 1957, Newfield had been in Canada directing 36 episodes of the television series Hawkeye and the Last of the Mohicans (aka The Last of the Mohicans) starring John Hart and Lon Chaney, Jr. The pilot, directed by Sidney Salkow, was made in Hollywood; two episodes were directed by Sigmund Neufeld's son, Stanley Neufeld. It was from this series, produced by Sig, that features were compiled and released to television in 1962: Along the Mohawk Trail, The Long Rifle and the Tomahawk (co-dir: Sidney Salkow), The Pathfinder and the Mohican, and The Redman and the Renegades. Another compilation feature, The Adventures of Hawkeye—Indian Scout, was released to television in 1963, probably in the UK only. The series, filmed with the co-operation of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, was produced by Normandie Productions, Ltd., the Canadian subsidiary of Television Programs of America, the US company that also handled Ramar of the Jungle (although it was initially handled by Arrow Distributing Co.) and Captain Gallant of the Foreign Legion. (Note: All 39 episodes of Hawkeye were copyrighted with the date January 14, 1957, coinciding with its debut on US television the next day (e.g. on KPIX, San Francisco), but production was still going on at that time. Variety reported the series still in production in March, and the Toronto Star reported filming would be completed by April.)

Newfield was also in Canada directing part of the television series The Adventures of Tugboat Annie (aka Tugboat Annie) starring Minerva Urecal, filmed between July 15, 1957 and February 1958. With 39 episodes if one includes the Hollywood pilot, the series was produced by Normandie Productions in conjunction with Associated-Rediffusion of the UK. Leslie Goodwins, under the supervision of Sigmund Neufeld, directed the initial episodes, and it is likely those directed by Sam were made after his two Regal features.

Interiors for the two features and two television series were filmed at the Canadian Film Industries, Ltd., studio outside Toronto, owned by Arthur Gottlieb who was co-executive producer of the two films Newfield made in Ontario in 1935. The plant, commonly referred to as Lakeshore Studios, was the site of Gottleib's Audio Pictures, Ltd. which saw a major upgrade in 1948, replacing the studio built in the early 1930s, becoming Canada's most modern film studio and laboratory. In the mid-1950s a $750,000 expansion program was announced, touted to be one of the most modern studios outside Hollywood. In reality the small studio, used almost exclusively for shorts, was confining and most of the filming for the features and television series was shot outdoors.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The bulk of Sam Newfield's short films, almost all two-reelers, were produced by the Stern Film Corp., headed by brothers Abe and Julius Stern. The company, previously known as Century Film Corp., had been making comedy shorts since 1914 for release by Universal, whose president, Carl Laemmle, was married to Julius Sterns' daughter.

Under Sigmund Neufeld, Stern's production manager, Sam directed episodes of the The Excuse Maker, What Happened to Jane, Let George Do It, Buster Brown, Mike and Ike, and Newlyweds and Their Baby series.

The Stern Film Corp. had their own studio in Hollywood, initially at 6100 Sunset Blvd., known as Century Studio, but it was destroyed by fire in August 1926, causing $400,000 to $500,000 in damage, and was rebuilt almost adjacent to the old site, at 6040 Sunset (listed in the 1929 Los Angeles City Directory at 6048 Sunset; the 1926 edition listed Century Film Corp. at 6102 Sunset). In 1929 production of the two-reelers moved, along with the Neufelds, to Universal City when the Sterns retired.

 

Title Company / Distributor Copyright Release    
Motion Picture News, January 23, 1926: A new production policy under which only series of high class comedies will be made by the company has been announced by the Stern Brothers, producers for the Universal release schedule. Hereafter the pictures will be known as the Stern Brothers Comedies, the former output—Century Comedies—is to be discontinued.
Which Is Which? Stern/Universal 4-26-26 10-10-26 The Excuse Maker 2
Jane's Engagement Party Stern/Universal 5-18-26 11-7-26 What Happened to Jane 2
Please Excuse Me Stern/Universal 6-26-26 11-10-26 The Excuse Maker 2
Jane's Predicament Stern/Universal 6-22-26 12-14-26 What Happened to Jane 2
What's Your Hurry? Stern/Universal 4-30-26 2-9-27 The Excuse Maker 2
Ask Dad White/Educational 2-16-27 2-27-27 Cameo Comedy 1
Jack White Corp./Educational Film Exchanges, Inc.
All Wet Samuel Van Ronkel/Universal   4-4-27 The Gumps 2
Film Daily, January 27, 1923: “Universal will release a series of “Andy Gump” two reelers to be produced by Samuel Van Ronkel. It is understood the contract covers a period of five years and was closed last November.”

Listed in the IMDb as the “Thirteenth episode, third series, of The Gumps 2-reel comedy series.” From 1923–1928 Universal copyrighted 48 of the Gump two-reelers with no mention of All Wet, nor was that title ever listed in the Motion Picture News' shorts section relating to the series. The Copyright Catalog lists 12 titles for each series. I believe this title does not exist and was probably confused with Newfield's 1930 short with the same name.
Auntie's Ante White/Educational 5-2-27 5-8-27 Cameo Comedy 1
A Gym Dandy White/Educational 5-10-27 5-22-27 Cameo Comedy 1
Jane's Sleuth Stern/Universal 3-31-27 6-22-27 What Happened to Jane 2
My Mistake Stern/Universal 5-5-27 6-29-27 The Excuse Maker 2
What an Excuse Stern/Universal 3-29-27 7-13-27 The Excuse Maker 2
On Furlough Stern/Universal 6-9-27 7-27-27 Let George Do It 2
Rushing Business Stern/Universal 6-9-27 8-31-27 Let George Do It 2
Nize People West Bros./Artclass   10-10-27 Izzie and Lizzie 2
West Brothers Happiness Comedies Inc./Weiss Brothers' Artclass Pictures Corp.
The Disordered Orderly Stern/Universal 6-9-27 11-9-27 Let George Do It 2
Copyright Catalog, as A Disordered Orderly, says directed by Samuel Newfield. IMDb says co-directed by Gus Meins.
On Deck Stern/Universal 6-9-27 11-30-27 Let George Do It 2
High Flyin' George Stern/Universal 9-10-27 1-25-28 Let George Do It 2
Man of Letters Stern/Universal 9-20-27 2-15-28 Let George Do It 2
George's False Alarm Stern/Universal 1-18-28 2-29-28 Let George Do It 2
Watch, George! Stern/Universal 10-6-27 3-28-28 Let George Do It 2
When George Hops Stern/Universal 10-19-27 4-25-28 Let George Do It 2
Sailor George Stern/Universal 2-3-28 5-9-28 Let George Do It 2
George's School Daze Stern/Universal 11-23-27 5-30-28 Let George Do It 2
George Meets George Stern/Universal 12-20-27 6-20-28 Let George Do It 2
Buster Minds the Baby Stern/Universal 5-15-28 6-27-28 Buster Brown 2
Big Game George Stern/Universal 12-16-27 7-18-28 Let George Do It 2
Good Scout Buster Stern/Universal 5-15-28 7-25-28 Buster Brown 2
Busting Buster Stern/Universal 5-15-28 8-15-28 Buster Brown 2
She's My Girl! Stern/Universal 1-5-28 8-22-28 Let George Do It 2
Halfback Buster Stern/Universal 5-28-28 9-19-28 Buster Brown 2
Buster Trims Up Stern/Universal 6-6-28 10-17-28 Buster Brown 2
Teacher's Pest Stern/Universal 6-15-28 11-14-28 Buster Brown 2
Watch the Birdie Stern/Universal 6-20-28 12-12-28 Buster Brown 2
Hold Your Horses Stern/Universal 7-10-28 1-7-29 Mike and Ike 2
IMDb says directed by Francis Corby. Film Daily review, December 23, 1928, says directed by Sam Newfield.
Out at Home Stern/Universal 6-20-28 1-9-29 Buster Brown 2
Have Patience Stern/Universal 7-5-28 2-6-29 Buster Brown 2
Take Your Pick Stern/Universal 7-23-28 2-13-29 Mike and Ike 2
The Newlyweds' Visit Stern/Universal 11-1-28 2-20-29 Newlyweds and Their Baby 2
She's a Pippin Stern/Universal 12-21-28 3-13-29 Mike and Ike 2
Tige's Girl Friend Stern/Universal 1-18-29 4-3-29 Buster Brown 2
This Way Please Stern/Universal 1-8-29 4-10-29 Mike and Ike 2
Magic Stern/Universal 1-31-29 5-1-29 Buster Brown 2
Delivering the Goods Stern/Universal 1-31-29 5-29-29 Buster Brown 2
Chaperons Stern/Universal 1-15-29 6-5-29 Mike and Ike 2
Copyright Catalog (as Chaperons), Film Daily and Motion Picture News (both as Chaperones) says directed by Samuel Newfield. IMDb says co-directed by Gus Meins.
Outdoor Sports Stern/Universal 6-3-29 6-17-29 Sid Saylor 2
Copyright Catalog and IMDb says directed by Gus Meins. Motion Picture News review, December 11, 1929, says “Directed by Meins and Newfield.”
Buster's Spooks Stern/Universal 2-7-29 6-26-29 Buster Brown 2
Buster's Choice Stern/Universal   6-26-29 Buster Brown 2
Listed in the IMDb, directed by Sam Newfield, Buster's Choice does not exist—it is simply a duplicate of Buster's Spooks with the wrong title.
Stop Barking Stern/Universal 2-7-29 8-21-29 Buster Brown 2
Film Daily, February 26, 1929: “Contract of Stern Film Co., with Universal will not be renewed, The Film Daily learns. The Sterns for years have supplied comedies for the Universal program.”

Film Daily, March 22, 1929: ““U” WILL REPLACE STERN COMEDIES WITH ITS OWN. Gap left in Universal's short subject release schedule by withdrawal of the Stern Bros. unit will be filled by a group of 50 two-reel comedies which Universal will make. One series will star Arthur Lake. Sig Newfeld will supervise.”

Film Daily, March 31, 1929: “The plans of Stern Brothers, pioneer producers of comedies are very indefinite. Universal has not renewed with the Sterns, but will make its own comedy subjects to fill out its program. At present, space at Stern Bros. studio is being leased to independent producers.”
Night Owls Universal 9-14-29 9-25-29 Arthur Lake 2
Too Many Women Universal 10-5-29 10-23-29 Sid Saylor 2
Doing His Stuff Universal 11-5-29 11-20-29 Arthur Lake 2
Copyright Catalog and IMDb says directed by Harry Edwards. Motion Picture News, March 15, 1930, says directed by Sam Newfield. The Motion Picture News review, October 19, 1929, lists no director.
French Leave Universal 2-25-30 3-19-30 Sid Saylor 2
Fellow Students Universal 3-1-30 4-9-30 Sid Saylor 2
She's a He Universal 3-17-30 5-10-30 Sunny Jim 2
Peek-A-Boo Universal 3-31-30 5-21-30 Arthur Lake 2
All Wet Universal 3-8-30 5-24-30 Sid Saylor 2
Sid's Long Count Universal 3-24-30 5-28-30 Sid Saylor 2
Her Bashful Beau Universal 3-17-30 6-11-30 Arthur Lake 2
The Beauty Parade Universal 3-31-30 7-2-30 Arthur Lake 2
Stop That Noise Universal 8-2-30 7-16-30 Sunny Jim 2
Copyright Catalog and IMDb says directed by Gus Meins. Motion Picture News review, June 14, 1930, says directed by ‘Sam Newfeld.’
Wedding Belles Cavalcade     Lloyd Hamilton 2
On August 3, 1934, Daily Variety reported that comedian Lloyd Hamilton was in films again and had started work that day on the first of a series of two-reelers for Cavalcade Pictures, with Sam Neufeld directing. The short could be Wedding Belles, which an IMDb user's comment says is erroneously dated 1931 because of an LA Evening Herald newspaper headline seen in the film dated May 28, 1934. The Variety item could also be the start of a film that was never made. Wedding Belles was not known to be released theatrically.
You Can Be Had Universal 12-27-35 1-8-36 Talking Chimps 2

On October 6, 1933, Daily Variety reported that next week Arthur Alexander, Sam Neufeld and Bert Sternbach would start Chimps Champ, a two-reel chimpanzee comedy. You Can Be Had was produced by Arthur Alexander and Bert Sternbach, so they did eventually make a chimp comedy.

Previously, Sam probably helped Sigmund Neufeld direct the 12 Tiffany Talking Chimp comedies made between 1930 and 1931: The Blimp Mystery, The Little Covered Wagon, The Little Big House, The Little Divorcee, Nine Nights in a Bar Room, Chasing Around, Africa Squawks, Aping Hollywood, My Children, Cinnamon, Skimpy, and Broadcasting.

Sweet Patootie, incorrectly listed on the IMDb as one of the series, was a working title for either The Little Covered Wagon or Nine Nights in a Bar Room. My Children was made under the working title Gland Hotel; Broadcasting, as Ex-King.

One Big Mistake Supreme Pictures   1941 Pigmeat Markham 2
Mr. Smith Goes Ghost Supreme Pictures   1941 Pigmeat Markham 2

According to The Pittsburgh Courier, January 18, 1940, both of these were noted as recently completed, and probably made back-to-back since they share the same cast. The 1946 Boxoffice Barometer listed Pigmeat Markham's Laugh Hepcats as being directed by Sam Newfield, running 36 minutes, the featurette—first released in 1944—culled from the two aforementioned shorts. Both were reissued individually by Consolidated National Film Exchanges and then Toddy Pictures, and later in the Pigmeat's Laugh Hepcats compilation.

Both shorts were written by Harry Fraser and Phil Dunham, despite evidence to the contrary.

 

 

 

 

Alternate Titles

 

Alternate Title Filmography Title
Across the Border The Lone Rider Crosses the Rio
Adventure Unlimited White Pongo
Arrest at Sundown Trails of the Wild
Assignment in China State Department File 649
Bad Man of Harlem Harlem on the Prairie
The Bandit The Lone Rider and the Bandit
Battling Outlaw Billy the Kid in Texas
Beast of Berlin Hitler—Beast of Berlin
Beasts of Berlin Hitler—Beast of Berlin
Billy the Kid in Cattle Stampede Cattle Stampede
Billy the Kid in Fugitive of the Plains Fugitive of the Plains
Billy the Kid in Law and Order Law and Order
Billy the Kid in Sheriff of Sage Valley Sheriff of Sage Valley
Billy the Kid in The Kid Rides Again The Kid Rides Again
Billy the Kid in The Mysterious Rider The Mysterious Rider
Billy the Kid in The Renegades The Renegades
Billy the Kid in Western Cyclone Western Cyclone
Black Mountain Stage Riders of Black Mountain
Border Marshal Outlaws of the Rio Grande
Cheyenne The Lone Rider in Cheyenne
Code of the Plains The Renegades
Desert Escape Marked Men
The Devil's Weed Wild Weed
The Double Alibi Law and Order
Fighting Crusader Frontier Crusader
Frontier Fighters Western Cyclone
Frontier Fury The Lone Rider in Frontier Fury
Frontier Queen Frontier Gambler
Gang Busters Arizona Gang Busters
Ghost Mine The Lone Rider in Ghost Town
Ghost Town The Lone Rider in Ghost Town
The Girl and the Gorilla Nabonga Gorilla
Goose Step Hitler—Beast of Berlin
Gorilla Nabonga Gorilla
Gun Justice Billy the Kid's Gun Justice
Gun Trouble Gun Code
Heaven Bound Big Time or Bust
Hell's Devils Hitler—Beast of Berlin
Hot Wires Crashing Through Danger
The Jungle Woman Nabonga
The King's Plate Thoroughbred
Ladies of the Chorus Queen of Burlesque
Lady in the Fog Scotland Yard Inspector
Lawless Town The Lone Rider Fights Back
The Lone Rider The Lone Rider in Texas Justice
The Lone Rider in Border Roundup Border Roundup
The Lone Rider in Death Rides the Plains Death Rides the Plains
The Lone Rider in Outlaws of Boulder Pass Outlaws of Boulder Pass
The Lone Rider in Overland Stagecoach Overland Stagecoach
The Lone Rider in Raiders of Red Gap Raiders of Red Gap
The Lone Rider in Wild Horse Rustlers Wild Horse Rustlers
The Lone Rider in Wolves of the Range Wolves of the Range
Lone Star Marshal The Texas Marshal
Nabonga Nabonga Gorilla
The Murder of Edward Graham Go-Get-'Em, Haines
Outlawed Billy the Kid Outlawed
Panhandle Trail The Mysterious Rider
Police Rookie I Take This Oath
Racket Doctor Am I Guilty?
Range Justice Billy the Kid's Gun Justice
Range War Billy the Kid's Range War
Rangeland Racket The Lone Rider in Frontier Fury
The Renegade The Renegades
Renfrew of the Royal Mounted in Fighting Mad Fighting Mad
Rider of the Plains The Lone Rider Rides On
Secrets of a Model School Secrets of a Model
She Shoulda Said 'NO'! Wild Weed
Skip Tracer Hold That Woman!
Smoking Guns Billy the Kid's Smoking Guns
Square Shooter Skipalong Rosenbloom
Tell It to the Marines Leave It to the Marines
Texas Justice The Lone Rider in Texas Justice
Texas Trouble Billy the Kid's Range War
Three Outlaws Three Desperate Men
Trail of Terror The Colorado Kid
Trapped in the Badlands The Lone Rider Ambushed
Trigger Men Billy the Kid's Fighting Pals
Under Cover Undercover Men
Vengeance Valley of Vengeance
Vice Raid Reform Girl
The White Gorilla Nabonga

 

 

 

 

 

In May 1930 Sigmund Neufeld was hired by Phil Goldstone of Tiffany to head its short subject department, where Sig directed the Tiffany Talking Chimps series of two-reelers. Trade publications are full of references to Sig directing, including some of the copyright records. However, a short biography of Sam Newfield in The Film Daily (spelled Neufield; see below) states he directed the series, although the author probably confused his brother's name with Sig's. In any case it is likely they both worked on the films, which were very popular and even spawned toys and—perhaps just studio hype—a chimp training school on the studio lot.

In total, two series of six shorts were produced in 1930 and 1931: The Blimp Mystery, The Little Covered Wagon, The Little Big House, The Little Divorcee, Nine Nights in a Bar Room, Chasing Around, Africa Squawks, Aping Hollywood, My Children, Cinnamon, Skimpy, and Broadcasting.

 

 

Sam Newfield's two-reeler You Can Be Had (1935), produced by Bert Sternbach, Newfield's longtime production manager, and Arthur Alexander whom Newfield worked for at Colony Pictures. Arthur also would make films for PRC under the name Alexander-Stern Productions along with his brother Max, nephews of Universal boss Carl Laemmle.

The short was obviously an attempt to recapture the popularity of the original Tiffany Talking Chimps series before the studio's demise in 1932.

Sig Neufeld also directed human shorts for Tiffany, such as One Punch O'Toole (1931) starring Paul Hurst, Pert Kelton, Eddie Boland, Aggie Herring and Bud Jameson.

 

 

 

 

 

Posters and Lobby Cards

 

 

A lost Newfield film from Texas? No, it is a misprinted poster showing Sam Newfield's name when it should be Al Herman's.

Sack Amusement Enterprises, a longtime Texas-based distributor, re-issued the film in the 1940s with the wrong director's name. The film is from 1935, produced by Max and Arthur Alexander's Beacon Productions before they formed Colony Pictures.

 

 

Sam Newfield's most controversial film, originally titled Wild Weed (1949). Banned outright in the UK and condemned by the National Legion of Decency, which wrote: “The subject matter of this film is considered morally unsuitable for entertainment motion picture audiences. Moreover, it contains suggestive sequences.”

 

 

The Devil's Weed (1949), aka Wild Weed and She Shoulda Said 'NO'!

 

 

She Shoulda Said 'NO'! (1949), aka Wild Weed and The Devil's Weed.

 

 

She Shoulda Said 'NO'! (1949), aka Wild Weed and The Devil's Weed.

 

 

Mantan Messes Up (1946).

 

 

Mantan Messes Up (1946).

 

 

After making the Tower films, in late 1934 Newfield began the first of four Bill Boyd actioners for Select Productions. Federal Agent was the first, known under the Winchester Pictures banner and released months after Republic Pictures was founded in April 1935 after Consolidated foreclosed on a number of companies.

 

 

Exploitation king J.D. Kendis' Secrets of a Model (1939), directed by Newfield in six days with a negative cost of $10,501.70. Almost condemned by the National Legion of Decency, it received a B rating: “Suggestive situations and implications.”

The producer's next film would be Escort Girl without Sam directing but with much of the same crew.

 

 

Secrets of a Model (1939).

 

 

Newfield's first western, Northern Frontier (1935), the second under Kermit Maynard's contract with Ambassador Pictures. The first, The Fighting Trooper (directed by Ray Taylor), was announced under production in late October 1934 as “being produced by Maurice Conn and his new partner, Sig Neufeld.” Maynard would make 18 films for Ambassador.

 

 

Marrying Widows (1934), one of five films directed by Newfield for Tower Productions.

 

 

Adventure Island (1947).

 

 

The Black Raven (1943) featuring George Zucco, PRC's inhouse horror star. Newfield also would direct Zucco in The Mad Monster (1942), Dead Men Walk (1943), The Monster Maker (1944), and The Flying Serpent (1946).

 

 

Lost Continent (1951), filmed in 11 days at the Goldwyn Studios.

 

 

The Traitor (1936), the last of Tim McCoy's 10-picture deal with Puritan Pictures. The first two were made by others, with Sig Neufeld and Leslie Simmonds producing the remainder (under Sam's direction) for their Excelsior Pictures unit.

 

 

Thunder Over Sangoland (1955), one of four features released theatrically by Lippert Pictures that were culled from the television series Ramar of the Jungle. The print has a 1954 copyright statement but was filmed in 1953.

 

 

The Rangers' Round-Up (1938), one of six Fred Scott westerns directed by Newfield. Comedian Stan Laurel financed this one and two others.

 

 

House-Rent Party (1946), produced by Ted Toddy. Newfield also directed four other known “all-colored” feature films, and the author suspects there could be more.

 

 

Death Rides the Range (1939), produced by the Alexander brothers, Max and Arthur, for their Colony Pictures. The two would later produce for PRC.

 

 

Scotland Yard Inspector (1952), produced in the UK as Lady in the Fog. Filmed back-to-back with The Gambler and the Lady.

 

 

Six-Gun Rhythm (1939).

 

 

Queen of Burlesque (1946).

 

 

Am I Guilty? (1940), re-issued in 1944 by Toddy Pictures as Racket Doctor.

 

 

Racket Doctor (1940, aka Am I Guilty?).

 

 

One Big Mistake (1940), a short produced by Supreme Pictures, lensed back-to-back with Mr. Smith Goes Ghost, also starring Pigmeat Markham.

 

 

Mr. Smith Goes Ghost (1940), a short produced by Supreme Pictures, as reissued by Toddy Pictures. Lensed back-to-back with One Big Mistake, also starring Pigmeat Markham.

 

 

Fighting Mad (1939), the fourth in a series of eight films with James Newill as Sergeant Renfrew. The first two were handled by Grand National but with their demise Monogram handled the others.

 

 

Hitler—Beast of Berlin (1939), Newfield's first film for Producers Pictures Corp., the soon-to-be Producers Releasing Corp.

 

 

Three on a Ticket (1947), Newfield's last film for PRC, one of five in a series with Hugh Beaumont as detective Michael Shayne. Last in the series was directed by William Beaudine.

 

 

Code of the Rangers (1938).

 

 

Wild Horse Rustlers (1943).

 

 

Along the Sundown Trail (1942).

 

 

Marked Men (1940).

 

 

Danger! Women at Work (1943).

 

 

Motor Patrol (1950).

 

 

The Wild Dakotas (1956).

 

 

Roarin' Lead (1936).

 

 

Flaming Lead (1939).

 

 

Skipalong Rosenbloom (1951).

 

 

The Lady Confesses (1945).

 

 

Jungle Flight (1947).

 

 

Reform Girl (1933), Sam's first feature, started in late January 1933.

 

 

Wolf Dog (1958).

 

 

The Counterfeiters (1948).

 

 

Three Desperate Men (1951).

 

 

Moonlight on the Range (1937).

 

 

Timber War (1935).

 

 

The Lone Rider Crosses the Rio (1941).

 

 

Billy the Kid's Fighting Pals (1941).

 

 

Branded a Coward (1935).

 

 

Leave It to the Marines (1951).

 

 

Lightnin' Bill Carson (1936).

 

 

Frontier Scout (1938).

 

 

Border Badmen (1945).

 

 

Sky High (1951).

 

 

Mask of the Dragon (1951).

 

 

Overland Stagecoach (1942).

 

 

The Invisible Killer (1940).

 

 

Jungle Siren (1942).

 

 

Dead Men Walk (1943).

 

 

Larceny in Her Heart (1946).

 

 

Thundering Gun Slingers (1944).

 

 

The Flying Serpent (1946).

 

 

Frontier Gambler (1956).

 

 

The Fighting Renegade (1939).

 

 

Bulldog Courage (1935).

 

 

Harlem on the Prairie (1937).

 

 

Harlem on the Prairie (1937), as re-issued by Toddy Pictures.

 

 

Harlem on the Prairie (1937), as re-issued by Toddy Pictures.

 

 

The Sagebrush Family Trails West (1940).

 

 

Lightning Carson Rides Again (1938).

 

 

Outlaw Women (1951).

Producer Ron Ormond's name never seemed to appear on posters and lobby cards as co-director, but he is credited on the print itself.

 

 

Outlaws of the Plains (1946), with the film's working title shown on the poster.

 

 

Desert Patrol (1938).

 

 

Texas Renegades (1940).

 

 

Big Time or Bust (1933).

 

 

Fugitive of the Plains (1943).

 

 

Trigger Pals (1939).

 

 

Overland Riders (1946).

 

 

Apology for Murder (1945).

 

 

Border Roundup (1942).

 

 

The Three Outlaws (1956).

 

 

The Lone Rider Rides On (1941).

 

 

Fighting Bill Carson (1945).

 

 

Trigger Fingers (1939).

 

 

The Gambler and the Lady (1952).

 

 

Texas Wildcats (1939).

 

 

Knight of the Plains (1938).

 

 

Flaming Frontier (1958), Newfield's swan song. Like Wolf Dog (1958) and the television series Hawkeye and the Last of the Mohicans and The Adventures of Tugboat Annie, Newfield ended his career directing in Ontario, Canada.

 

 

The Terror of Tiny Town (1938), undoubtedly Newfield's best-known film. Jed Buell, former head of publicity for the Sennett Studios rental department, had almost completed the film when Sol Lesser, impressed with what he saw, financed additional sequences through his Principal Productions.

 

 

Lady at Midnight (1948).

 

 

Fight That Ghost (1946).

 

 

Blonde for a Day (1946).

 

 

Like the other three Bill Boyd films (Federal Agent, Go-Get-'Em, Haines and Racing Luck), Burning Gold (1935) was made shortly before he became Hopalong Cassidy.

 

 

The Sea Hound (1947), a 15-chapter Columbia serial directed by Walter B. Eason and Mack V. Wright, and produced by Sam Katzman.

Although not appearing in the filmography, Sam started the serial but was badly injured early into production.

 

 

The Lion's Den (1936).

 

 

Hold That Woman! (1940).

 

 

Ridin' the Lone Trail (1937).

 

 

Fingerprints Don't Lie (1951).

 

 

Trail of Vengeance (1937).

 

 

Valley of Vengeance (1944).

 

 

Miraculous Journey (1948).

 

 

White Pongo (1945).

 

 

Radar Secret Service (1950).

 

 

Prairie Pals (1942).

 

 

Outlaws of the Rio Grande (1941).

 

 

Last of the Desperados (1955).

 

 

Sheriff of Sage Valley (1942).

 

 

The Colorado Kid (1937).

 

 

I Accuse My Parents (1944).

 

 

The Important Witness (1933).

 

 

The Strange Mrs. Crane (1948).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The five ‘mystery’ films outlined in the filmography. “Return of Mandy's Husband,” “What a Guy” and “Mantan Runs for Mayor” were directed by A. Selah, someone lost to film history.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Neil Roughley Backlot Reference Works
n_roughley@shaw.ca

URL: http://dukefilmography.com/sam_newfield.html last modified: July 15, 2020