Louis B. Mayer said that John Wayne had an endless face and he can go on forever. Appearing in more films than any major star, the legacy of John Wayne continues with the popularity of DVD. This filmography chronicles his amazing career, a catalog of theatrically released feature films and serials available on DVD, Blu-ray, LaserDisc, CED (RCA SelectaVision VideoDisc), and VHS.

Each film is linked via a new window to the Internet Movie Database which along with the American Film Institute Catalog of Feature Films, Fred Landesman's book The John Wayne Filmography, Allen Eyles' book John Wayne and the Movies, and my own research and ever-growing collection of films, formed the basis for this filmography.

Titles are spelled as they appear on the print and listed in order of release, with a note if the production sequence varies (e.g. Filmed before Dakota). The copyright registration date is used instead of the release date if the former was earlier. This dating method provides a more accurate chronology of production since some films, completed and ready for release, were held back a few months before hitting the exchanges.

 

 

Following the American theatrical distributor is the year of general release or premiere. The DVD's distributor and its catalog number appear next, both pertaining to the cover shown. In the case of most public domain titles, posters or other movie advertising are used instead. The DVD release date (month-day-year) is for the title itself and not always the cover shown. The few titles not available on Region 1 have additional information about their home video releases in North America (VHS and, if applicable, LaserDisc).

Region 1 DVDs that have other regions encoded on the disc follow the case type. These multi-zone DVDs, all but three from Warner Bros., make no mention of other regions on the packaging or discs. Also included at times is the mastering date of the DVD, noted as 'imprint'. Every disc has an internal date when it was created before being manufactured, almost always preceding its release by a few months. Where the two dates vary greatly, an imprint note is included. DVDs are often reissued with new packaging but the imprint dates remain the same, reflecting use of the original DVD masters; some release dates are ambiguous or delayed so these imprint dates are included in such cases.

Cast lists are generally based on the order and spelling as they appear five deep in the opening credits. If John Wayne's name does not appear within that criteria a note follows with billing information (e.g. '8th-billed', 'uncredited'). Films where he was uncredited are denoted in blue text with notes at the bottom of the filmography outlining his involvement—not always as an actor. Also included are his character names excluding in most cases aliases.

The principal cast is followed by the director, color process and if applicable the widescreen process. Unless noted all sound films were photographed full-frame and use standard 35mm film with four perforations running vertically at 24fps. Following the process is the aspect ratio used for the general release print, not necessarily the negative or DVD ratio. The latter is listed with the release date, including whether it is an anamorphic or non-anamorphic print. Some ratios with the same number vary slightly in size so rounding has been used.

If a cover and catalog number are shown for a DVD the running time listed is that of the disc itself, which is generally the film's original length. At times this is a source of conflict, especially with the many titles reissued after John Wayne became a major star, sometimes with added scenes that padded out the length (or vice versa). Many of his pre-1940 films on DVD are based on reissue prints—providing a newer, better source—and may not represent the original running times. DVD running times, including some for VHS, are based on the exclusion of extraneous—usually modern-day—elements added before or after the films. Where extraneous material has been omitted from the running time, the DVD's main movie index time follows (e.g. [xxm:xxs•]).

Although few are listed, running times for DVDs in PAL format are based on the true length of the film, with consideration given to the fact that not all PAL video plays 4% faster. Some DVDs (and other video) are encoded in such a way that PAL speed-up is not present so the time does not have to be compensated by a factor of 1.04 to match NTSC, which is the same as film time. So care has been taken to check for PAL speed-up, and where present the times have been converted to NTSC using the WFT Timecode Calculator. (PAL video that does not play 4% faster is because the film was mastered from an NTSC source. A few Republic titles in the UK from Universal, which has distribution rights to the Republic library, are mastered from NTSC sources.)

Running times—to the second—for films not officially released on DVD are also listed, although these may vary depending on a number of factors. Many of the prints in circulation, usually recorded from television, have been passed on through collector's circles through videotape and now DVD±, so accurate running times get lost in various encoding and conversion methods. I have seen films where the running times vary by over two minutes yet scene-for-scene are the same prints. Commercial studio DVDs are almost always soft-telecined at 24fps, so their times are more reflective of the original source prints. Therefore the times shown for films not officially released on DVD should not be taken as gospel. (See more about running times in the Blu-ray footnote.)

Prefacing the running time is the DVD's English-only Dolby audio track or tracks—those of other languages are not included, nor are any other audio formats (e.g. PCM or DTS) since Dolby is exclusive to all the DVD titles listed herein. Dolby Surround tracks are in stereo except when, however rare, they are followed by a 'mono' note (see below). When a stereo track has been remixed from a mono source (e.g. a 5.1 mix), a 'remixed from mono' note follows. All the audio tracks have been analyzed both aurally and more importantly through software (AC3Filter) to check for mis-labeled DVD packaging, notably Republic titles which tend to state the audio incorrectly: a number are listed as Dolby 2.0 Surround but are actually Dolby 2.0, and conversely some are simply listed as Dolby monaural audio when they are specifically Dolby 2.0 Surround (albeit an odd way to encode a mono soundtrack).

Copyright information is based on the print itself; for those not viewed, especially Wayne's pre-Monogram days, I have used the Catalog of Copyright Entries, Motion Pictures, published by the Library of Congress. If a production company is involved other than the copyright claimant, that name follows but for independent productions excludes the co-operation of a studio (e.g. Without Reservations was co-produced with RKO and Big Jim McLain was co-produced with Warner Bros.).

Some early films have incomplete on-screen copyright statements, omitting the claimant and sometimes the year but full information was registered with the Copyright Office, and it is this information which is used. (Only four of John Wayne's sound features, all from Monogram, were never registered with the Copyright Office.) On-screen dates are not always accurate: The Night Riders has 1938 even though it was filmed in February 1939; Hondo has 1952 even though production began in mid-1953 and The Greatest Story Ever Told has 1165. (The Catalog of Copyright Entries is more accurate than the copyright information in the AFI catalog because the former includes, although not consistently, 'in notice' dates.)

Included in the filmography are the certificate numbers from the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America (MPPDA), renamed the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) in late 1945. These numbers, from the Production Code Administration Office, first appeared in mid-1934. Initially Monogram and Republic were not signatories of the MPPDA so their early films did not have certificates. Some pre-1934 films were given certificates upon reissue, which may not be included in the filmography (such numbers are followed by an 'R'). Most of the numbers were culled from the online AFI catalog, an ongoing endeavor whose certificate detail does not currently cover post-1960 titles. For those I have taken the numbers from the prints themselves and from a collective list maintained at members.chello.nl/~a.degreef/.

 

John Wayne will forever be connected with Republic Pictures, and as such special mention must be made because so much of his work is associated with the former studio and its predecessor, Monogram Pictures (which along with five other poverty row studios formed the basis for the new company). Wayne starred in the very first Republic production, Westward Ho, in 1935.

Herbert J. Yates, the head of Republic since its inception, sold out in 1959 and the name was changed to Republic Corporation in 1960, diversifying into plastics, electronics and household appliances, including film and studio rentals and film processing. The company, as a theatrical distribution and production house, with 23 sound stages, ceased to exist. In 1967 the studio lot was sold for $9.5 million to CBS, which had been leasing it, and the entire film library was sold for $3.35 million to National Telefilm Associates (NTA), a television distributor formed in 1954.

The majority of NTA was purchased in 1971 by Tele-Communications, Inc. (TCI), which by 1981 would become the largest cable company in the United States, bolstered by the 6000 film and television titles NTA had purchased from various producers over the years—the bulk of them from Republic. (In 1993, according to the company's archivist, Republic's library consisted of approximately 1400 features, 52 serials, 1500 cartoons and/or short subjects, 1058 TV episodes, and 2880 TV episodes that were owned by NBC but distributed by Republic.)

In early 1985 National Telefilm Associates changed its name to Republic Pictures when rights to the name and other trademarks were acquired. Republic Pictures had existed just prior to 1985 but as an entirely different company, whose rights included the famous eagle trademark and the Republic Pictures name and its variants—all subsidiaries of Republic Industries which was in no way related to Republic Corporation or NTA. Incorporated in California in 1978, Republic Pictures—without its namesake's film library—had big plans as a production company, setting up offices in Hollywood and New York. In 1980 the company's assets included the Republic trademarks, a small library of films, real estate, and two mail-order concerns which sold nutritional guides and computerized horoscopes.

The eagle flies again—the Republic herald from 1979. The studio and film library were gone but the brand was strong enough to see the first rebirth of Republic Pictures, a short-lived corporate endeavor.

Before the second rebirth of Republic Pictures: a VHS cover from NTA Home Entertainment whose vast library of films, licensed to various home video distributors, was brought under the umbrella of one company—soon to be called Republic Pictures Home Video (and its sub-label, Spotlite Video).

 

An advertisement from the March 1985 issue of Boxoffice announcing the formation of Republic Pictures. “From now on, National Telefilm Associates will be known as Republic Pictures Corporation!” Click here for a full-size view.

In 1986 control of Republic Pictures was in the hands of the Paragon Group, an investment partnership founded by Russell Goldsmith who helmed Republic until it was acquired in mid-1994 by Spelling Entertainment. By year's end the majority of Spelling Entertainment would be owned by Viacom (Paramount), which gained full control in 1999. Thus Paramount came to own the Republic library. Two years earlier Republic Pictures Home Video wound down operations and the library was eventually licensed to Artisan Entertainment and its successor, Lions Gate Entertainment (now called Lionsgate), whose rights were to initially expire in 2006.

Paramount has over 900 features and serials produced by the former studio and can now distribute and license what it has owned since 1999 (in the UK the library is currently licensed to Universal). Paramount had announced a number of Wayne's Republic productions on DVD in 2006 (shown above), but they never materialized. In late 2011 Olive Films acquired home distribution rights to the classic Paramount library and, beginning with Rio Grande, have released many John Wayne titles never seen on DVD or Blu-ray before.

The major public domain distributors have stayed away from Wayne's early output from Universal, Warner Bros., Columbia and Fox. (Only Universal has not officially released any of its early Wayne titles on home video, including the Paramount-produced Born to the West and Lady and Gent which the studio now own.) Almost all the early titles are available from mail-order dealers or on eBay under the guise of an ex-VHS rental or studio DVD although never actually released on home video. Most of these dealers are now using DVD±R with the prints generally derived from consumer videotape or recorded direct-to-disc from television, not from original 16mm or 35mm elements. They are not official studio releases so the quality will never be the same.

Madden's Video Collectors Classic Western Movies, for instance, sells Wayne's early Republic westerns. Another such dealer is Bygone Video which like Madden use a web-based storefront and offer titles not officially released on DVD. Many of Wayne's early films from Universal, Warner Bros., Columbia and Fox are also available from Roberts Hard to Find Videos. Such dealers, though, are not referenced in the filmography since the films are not official studio releases. So for a film listed as Not available on DVD, some dealer out there has it on DVD±R or VHS. A film listed as Not available denotes it is not in circulation even in collector's circles but a print still exists.

Entries with TJWF denote Fred Landesman's The John Wayne Filmography has been cited; JWATM, Allen Eyles' John Wayne and the Movies; AFI, the American Film Institute; BBFC, British Board of Film Classification; BFI, British Film Institute; and TCM, Turner Classic Movies.

Entries with  denote an alternate image is shown by hovering over the default cover; , a third image is shown by clicking. In a few cases the alternate image is a poster or VHS instead of a DVD cover. Preference for the default cover is given to the title's original release (some alternate covers are not included so there is no completeness here). Entries with    denote the film has been colorized, although not all were available on home video (VHS) since some were released only to television. No DVD listed is the actual colorized version. denotes the film was released on Blu-ray (hover over the icon for information about the Blu-ray itself); on videocassette; on LaserDisc; on CED (RCA SelectaVision VideoDisc); and denotes the film is or was officially available for sale or rental in the United States as a digital download (video on demand), although public domain titles are excluded except for the Lone Star westerns from Mr. FAT-W Video.

 

 
1970's
     

The Shootist

Paramount (1976)
Paramount 08904 (keep case)

John Wayne (John Bernard Books), Lauren Bacall, Ron Howard, James Stewart, Richard Boone. Directed by Don Siegel. Technicolor; 1.85:1; 99 mins. ©1976 Dino De Laurentiis Corp. MPAA #24467. DVD release: 7-24-01 (1.78:1 anamorphic; 2.0 mono; 98m:53s).

 
 

Rooster Cogburn

Universal (1975)
Universal 20170 (keep case)

John Wayne (Reuben “Rooster” Cogburn), Katharine Hepburn, Anthony Zerbe, Richard Jordan, John McIntire. Directed by Stuart Millar. Technicolor; Panavision/2.39:1; 107 mins. ©1975 Universal Pictures. MPAA #24170. Anamorphic print available on Region 1 only in Universal's 3-disc, 5-movie John Wayne: Screen Legend Collection released 6-12-07 (2.35:1 anamorphic; 2.0 mono; 107m:05s [107m:11s•]; click for cover). DVD release: 3-31-98 (2.30:1 non-anamorphic; 2.0 mono; 107m:05s [107m:27s•]).

 
 

Brannigan

United Artists (1975)
MGM 1002568 (keep case)

John Wayne (Lt. Jim Brannigan), Richard Attenborough, Judy Geeson, Mel Ferrer, John Vernon. Directed by Douglas Hickox. Color by De Luxe; Panavision/2.39:1; 111 mins. ©1975 United Artists Corp. Produced by Wellborn Ltd. [see notes]. MPAA #24041. DVD release: 10-2-01 (2.35:1 anamorphic [most of the film has a ratio of 2.35:1 then inexplicably changes to 2.39:1]; 2.0 mono; 110m:40s [111m:09s•]). DVD-R release: 12-11-12: TGG Direct (via Amazon) from a newly mastered print (2.35:1 anamorphic; 1.0 mono; 111m:11s; cover shown on hover).

 
 

McQ

Warner Bros. (1974)
Warner Bros. 69229 (keep case; Region 1/2/3/4)

John Wayne (Det. Lt. Lon McQ), Eddie Albert, Diana Muldaur, Colleen Dewhurst, Clu Gulager. Directed by John Sturges. Technicolor; Panavision/2.39:1; 111 mins. ©1974 Warner Bros., Inc. A “Batjac and Levy-Gardner Production.” MPAA #23763. TJWF: 116 mins.; initial reviews were 114-115 mins. DVD release: 5-3-05 (2.39:1 anamorphic; 1.0 mono; 110m:51s [111m:13s•]).

 
 

Cahill: United States Marshal    UK: Cahill

Warner Bros. (1973)
Warner Bros. 15181 (snap case; Region 1/2/3/4)

John Wayne (U.S. Marshal J.D. Cahill), George Kennedy, Gary Grimes, Neville Brand, Clay O'Brien. Directed by Andrew V. McLaglen. Technicolor; Panavision/2.39:1; 102 mins. ©1973 Warner Bros., Inc. A “Batjac Production.” MPAA #23684. DVD release: 6-3-03 (2.35:1 anamorphic; 1.0 mono; 101m:53s [102m:08s•]).

 
 

The Train Robbers

Warner Bros. (1973)
Warner Bros. 69226 (keep case; Region 1/2/3/4)

John Wayne (Lane), Ann-Margret, Rod Taylor, Ben Johnson, Christopher George. Directed by Burt Kennedy. Technicolor; Panavision/2.39:1; 92 mins. ©1973 Warner Bros., Inc. A “Batjac Production.” MPAA #23340. DVD release: 5-3-05 (2.39:1 anamorphic; 1.0 mono; 91m:39s [91m:47s•]).

 
 

Cancel My Reservation

Warner Bros. (1973)
Shout! Factory SF12438 (3-disc keep case; 6-movie compilation)

Bob Hope, Eva Marie Saint, Ralph Bellamy, Forrest Tucker, Anne Archer, [John Wayne uncredited]. Directed by Paul Bogart. Technicolor (uncredited); 1.85:1; 99 mins. ©1972 Naho Enterprises. MPAA #23313. DVD release: 4-12-11 (1.33:1 [open-matte version]; 2.0 mono; 99m:07s).

 
 

The Cowboys

Warner Bros. (1972)
Warner Bros. 15183 (snap case)

John Wayne (Wil Andersen), Roscoe Lee Browne, Bruce Dern, Colleen Dewhurst, Slim Pickens. Directed by Mark Rydell. Technicolor; Panavision/2.39:1; 134 mins. including overture, entr'acte and exit music which was not included in the 128m:06s theatrical release. ©1971 Sanford Productions, Inc. and Warner Bros., Inc. MPAA #23040. DVD release: 10-6-98 (2.30:1 anamorphic; 5.1 Surround [see note below]; 134m:18s [134m:23s•]); 5-22-07: 1-disc deluxe edition (cover shown on hover) from a new transfer (2.39:1 anamorphic; 5.1 Surround [the music is 'true' stereo with the other audio remixed from mono]; 134m:15s; Region 1/2/3/4).

 
 

Big Jake

National General (1971)
Paramount 37115 (keep case)

John Wayne (Jacob “Big Jake” McCandles), Richard Boone, Patrick Wayne, Christopher Mitchum, Bruce Cabot. Directed by George Sherman. Technicolor; Panavision/2.35:1; 110 mins. ©1971 Batjac Productions, Inc. A “Cinema Center Films” presentation [see notes]. MPAA #22945. DVD release: 4-29-03 (2.35:1 anamorphic; 5.1 and 2.0 Surround [remixed from mono]; 109m:34s).

 
 

Rio Lobo

National General (1970)
Paramount 38011 (keep case)

John Wayne (Col. Cord McNally), Jorge Rivero, Jennifer O'Neill, Jack Elam, Christopher Mitchum. Directed by Howard Hawks. Technicolor; 1.85:1; 114 mins. ©1970 Malabar Productions, Inc. A “Cinema Center Films” presentation [see notes]. MPAA #22689. DVD release: 4-29-03 (1.78:1 anamorphic; 5.1 and 2.0 Surround [remixed from mono]; 114m:09s).

 
 

Chisum

Warner Bros. (1970)
Warner Bros. 11089 (snap case; Region 1/2/3/4)

John Wayne (John Simpson Chisum), Forrest Tucker, Christopher George, Ben Johnson, Glenn Corbett. Directed by Andrew V. McLaglen. Technicolor; Panavision/2.35:1; 111 mins. ©1970 Batjac Productions, Inc. and Warner Bros., Inc. MPAA #unknown. BBFC: 113m:21s. DVD release: 6-3-03 (2.35:1 anamorphic; 1.0 mono; 111m:14s).

     
     
     
     
     
     
 
1960's
     

The Undefeated

20th Century-Fox (1969)
Fox 2007560 (keep case)

John Wayne (Col. John Henry Thomas), Rock Hudson, Antonio Aguilar, Roman Gabriel, Marian McCargo. Directed by Andrew V. McLaglen. Color by De Luxe; Panavision/2.35:1; 118 mins. ©1969 Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. MPAA #22209. DVD release: 5-20-03 (2.35:1 anamorphic; 2.0 mono; 118m:08s).

 
 

True Grit

Paramount (1969)
Paramount 06833 (keep case)

John Wayne (Rooster Cogburn), Glen Campbell, Kim Darby, Jeremy Slate, Robert Duvall. Directed by Henry Hathaway. Technicolor; 1.85:1; 128 mins. ©1969 Paramount Pictures Corp., Hal B. Wallis and Joseph H. Hazen [Hal Wallis Productions]. MPAA #22045. DVD release: 3-21-00 (1.78:1 anamorphic; 2.0 mono; 127m:54s); 5-22-07: 1-disc collector's edition (cover shown on click) from a new transfer (1.78:1 anamorphic; 5.1 Surround [remixed from mono] and 2.0 mono; 127m:55s).

 
 

Hellfighters

Universal (1968)
Universal 20512 (keep case)

John Wayne (Chance Buckman), Katharine Ross, Jim Hutton, Vera Miles, Jay C. Flippen. Directed by Andrew V. McLaglen. Technicolor; Panavision/2.35:1; 121 mins. ©1968 Universal Pictures. MPAA #21851. Anamorphic print available on Region 1 only in Universal's 3-disc, 5-movie John Wayne: Screen Legend Collection released 6-12-07 (2.35:1 anamorphic; 2.0 Surround; 120m:52s [120m:57s•]; cover shown on hover). DVD release: 1-5-99 (2.65:1 [see notes] non-anamorphic; 2.0 Surround; 120m:52s [121m:04s•]).

 
 

The Green Berets

Warner Bros.-Seven Arts (1968)
Warner Bros. 1002 (snap case)

John Wayne (Col. Mike Kirby), David Janssen, Jim Hutton, Aldo Ray, Raymond St. Jacques. Directed by John Wayne and Ray Kellogg. Technicolor; Panavision/2.35:1; 142 mins. ©1968 Batjac Productions, Inc. and Warner Bros.-Seven Arts, Inc. MPAA #21657. BBFC: 142m:41s. Anamorphic print available on Region 1 only in Warner's 2-disc, 4-movie TCM Greatest Classic Films Collection: War—Battlefront Asia released 5-5-09 (2.35:1 anamorphic; 1.0 mono; 141m:48s; Region 1/2/3/4; cover shown on hover). The solo US and UK DVDs are 'flipper' discs. DVD release: 10-28-97 (2.35:1 non-anamorphic; 1.0 mono; 141m:51s [141m:56s•]).

 
 

The War Wagon

Universal (1967)
Universal 20298 (keep case)

John Wayne (Taw Jackson), Kirk Douglas, Howard Keel, Robert Walker, Keenan Wynn. Directed by Burt Kennedy. Technicolor; Panavision/2.35:1; 101 mins. ©1967 Batjac Productions, Inc. and Universal Pictures. A Batjac-Schwartz production. MPAA #21495. Anamorphic print available on Region 1 only in Universal's 3-disc, 5-movie John Wayne: Screen Legend Collection released 6-12-07 (2.35:1 anamorphic; 2.0 mono; 100m:33s; click for cover). DVD release: 8-18-98 (2.25:1 non-anamorphic; 2.0 mono; 100m:33s).

 
 

El Dorado

Paramount (1967)
Paramount 06625 (keep case)

John Wayne (Cole Thornton), Robert Mitchum, James Caan, Charlene Holt, Paul Fix. Directed by Howard Hawks. Technicolor; 1.85:1; 126 mins. ©1966 Paramount Pictures Corp. and Laurel Productions. MPAA #21158. Premiered in Japan December 1966 but released in the US after The War Wagon. DVD release: 3-21-00 (1.78:1 anamorphic; 2.0 mono; 126m:21s); 5-19-09: 2-disc Paramount Centennial Collection special edition (cover shown on click) from a new transfer (1.78:1 anamorphic; 2.0 mono; 126m:23s; Region 1/4).

 
 

Cast a Giant Shadow

United Artists (1966)
MGM 1003134 (keep case)

Kirk Douglas, Senta Berger, Angie Dickinson, James Donald, Stathis Giallelis, [John Wayne (Gen. Mike Randolph) last-billed]. Directed by Melville Shavelson. Color by De Luxe; Panavision/2.35:1; 138 mins. ©1966 Mirisch-Llenroc-Batjac [Mirisch Corp./Llenroc Productions/Batjac Productions, Inc.]. MPAA #21183. TJWF: 142 mins.; AFI: 141 mins.; copyrighted: 139 mins.; BBFC: 146m:53s; BFI: 12,420' [138m:00s]. DVD release: 2-5-02 (2.30:1 anamorphic; 2.0 mono; 137m:46s [138m:03s•]). 8-26-14: Kino Lorber from a newly mastered print (2.35:1 anamorphic; 2.0 mono; 137m:46s [138m:17s•]; cover shown on hover).

 
 

The Sons of Katie Elder

Paramount (1965)
Paramount 06729 (keep case)

John Wayne (John Elder), Dean Martin, Martha Hyer, Michael Anderson, Jr., Earl Holliman. Directed by Henry Hathaway. Technicolor; Panavision/2.35:1; 122 mins. ©1965 Paramount Pictures Corp., Hal B. Wallis and Joseph H. Hazen [Hal Wallis Productions], and John Wayne. MPAA #20933. DVD release: 6-5-01 (2.30:1 anamorphic; 2.0 mono; 121m:39s).

 
 

In Harm's Way

Paramount (1965)
Paramount 06418 (keep case)

John Wayne (Capt. Rockwell “Rock” Torrey), Kirk Douglas, Patricia Neal, Tom Tryon, Paula Prentiss. Directed by Otto Preminger. b&w; Panavision/2.35:1; 167 mins. ©1965 Sigma Productions, Inc. MPAA #20885. AFI and US/UK theatrical release: 165 mins.; BBFC: 165m:00s; BFI: 167m:06s; copyrighted: 170 mins. DVD release: 5-22-01 (2.35:1 anamorphic; 5.1 and 2.0 Surround; 166m:56s).

 
 

The Greatest Story Ever Told

United Artists (1965)
MGM 1001584 (2-disc keep case)

Max von Sydow, Michael Anderson, Jr., Carroll Baker, Ina Balin, Pat Boone, [John Wayne (centurion) 27th-billed]. Directed by George Stevens. Technicolor; Ultra Panavision 70 [65mm/5 perf. vertical/24fps]/2.75:1 [70mm]; 2.35:1 [35mm]; 199 mins. including exit music. ©1965 George Stevens Productions, Inc. and United Artists Corp. MPAA #20414. Filmed before Circus World. Copyrighted and world premiere: 221 mins.; general release: 195 mins.; BBFC: 198m:53s. DVD release: 3-6-01 (2-disc special edition; 2.75:1 anamorphic; 5.1 and 2.0 Surround; 198m:51s); 7-6-04 (movie-only edition). (See notes.)

 
 

Circus World    UK: The Magnificent Showman

Paramount (1964)
Tohokushinsha Film Corp. (Japan) TCD1061 (Region 2 NTSC; keep case)

John Wayne (Matt Masters), Claudia Cardinale, Rita Hayworth, Lloyd Nolan, Richard Conte. Directed by Henry Hathaway. Technicolor; Super Technirama-70 [35mm/8 perf. horizontal/24fps; presented in single-film Cinerama for roadshow engagements]/2.35:1; 138 mins. ©1964 Bronston-Midway Productions. MPAA #20610. Not available on Region 1. AFI: 135 mins.; copyrighted: 131 mins.; BBFC: 136m:47s and 131m:59s. The uncut version was released on VHS by Best Film & Video Corp. (cover shown on hover); on LaserDisc, in conjunction with Best Film & Video Corp., by Image Entertainment (2.35:1; 142m:37s with intermission and exit music; 137m:54s without music). View the Japanese DVD. DVD release: 2-27-03 (2.35:1 anamorphic; 4.0 Surround; 137m:54s [there is no intermission and exit music]). (See notes.)

 
 

McLintock!

United Artists (1963)
Paramount 88762 (keep case)

John Wayne (George Washington McLintock), Maureen O'Hara, Patrick Wayne, Stefanie Powers, Jack Kruschen. Directed by Andrew V. McLaglen. Technicolor; Panavision/2.35:1; 127 mins. ©1963 Batjac Productions, Inc. MPAA #20485. Also available on various public domain labels although four songs in the film are still under copyright. DVD release: 10-11-05 (2.30:1 anamorphic; 5.1 Surround [remixed from mono] and 2.0 mono; 126m:40s [127m:09s•]).

 

Donovan's Reef

Paramount (1963)
Paramount 06220 (keep case)

John Wayne (Michael Patrick “Guns” Donovan), Lee Marvin, Elizabeth Allen, Jack Warden, Cesar Romero. Directed by John Ford. Technicolor; 1.85:1; 109 mins. ©1963 Paramount Pictures Corp. and John Ford Productions, Inc. MPAA #20357. DVD release: 6-5-01 (1.78:1 anamorphic; 2.0 mono; 108m:30s).

 
 

How the West Was Won

Cinerama Releasing Corp. (1962 [see notes])/MGM (1963)
MGM 906292 (keep case)

Carroll Baker, Lee J. Cobb, Henry Fonda, Carolyn Jones, Karl Malden, [John Wayne (Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman) 12th-billed]. Directed by John Ford, Henry Hathaway and George Marshall. Technicolor; Cinerama [triple 35mm/6 perf. vertical/24fps]/2.65:1†; 2.35:1 [35mm]; 165 mins. including opening, intermission and exit music (153 mins. without music). ©1962 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc. and Cinerama, Inc. MPAA #20143. Filmed before The Longest Day. Copyrighted and general release (CinemaScope version): 149 mins.; BBFC: 163m:49s. First released 7-28-98 on MGM (cover shown) and 5-23-00 on Warner Bros. (Region 1/4; click for cover), both 2.35:1 non-anamorphic with 2.0 Surround from a Metrocolor reduction print (164m:27s). 9-9-08: 3-disc special edition and Ultimate Collector's edition (2.89:1 anamorphic; 5.1 Surround; 164m:30s; Region 1/2/3/4; cover shown on hover). †Boxoffice listed the aspect ratio as 3.18:1.

 
 

The Longest Day

20th Century-Fox (1962)
Fox 4115660 (keep case)

Eddie Albert, Paul Anka, Arletty, Jean-Louis Barrault, Richard Beymer, [John Wayne (Lt. Col. Benjamin Vandervoort) last-billed]. Directed by Ken Annakin, Andrew Marton and Bernhard Wicki. b&w; CinemaScope/2.35:1; 178 mins. ©1962 Darryl F. Zanuck Productions, Inc. and Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. MPAA #unknown. TJWF, AFI and copyrighted: 180 mins.; BBFC: 178m:28s. DVD release: 11-2-99 (2.30:1 non-anamorphic; 5.0 and 2.0 Surround; 178m:10s); 5-23-06: 2-disc special edition (2.35:1 anamorphic; 4.0 and 2.0 Surround; 178m:11s; cover shown on hover).

 
 

Hatari!

Paramount (1962)
Paramount 06629 (keep case)

John Wayne (Sean Mercer), Hardy Kruger, Elsa Martinelli, Red Buttons, Gerard Blain. Directed by Howard Hawks. Technicolor; 1.85:1; 157 mins. ©1961 Paramount Pictures Corp. and Malabar Productions, Inc. MPAA #19999. Filmed before The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance and The Comancheros. TJWF, AFI and copyrighted: 159 mins.; BBFC: 158m:29s; BFI: 14,184' [157m:36s]. DVD release: 7-24-01 (1.78:1 anamorphic; 2.0 mono; 157m:19s).

 
 

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance

Paramount (1962)
Paramount 06114 (keep case)

John Wayne (Tom Doniphon), James Stewart, Vera Miles, Lee Marvin, Edmond O'Brien. Directed by John Ford. b&w; 1.85:1; 123 mins. ©1961 Paramount Pictures Corp. and John Ford Productions, Inc. MPAA #20128. BBFC: 125m:23s. DVD release: 6-5-01 (1.85:1 anamorphic; 5.1 Surround [remixed from mono] and 2.0 mono; 123m:11s); 5-19-09: 2-disc Paramount Centennial Collection special edition (click for cover) from a new transfer (1.78:1 anamorphic; 5.1 Surround [remixed from mono] and 2.0 mono; 123m:13s; Region 1/4).

 
 

The Comancheros

20th Century-Fox (1961)
Fox 2007542 (keep case)

John Wayne (Ranger Capt. Jake Cutter), Stuart Whitman, Ina Balin, Nehemiah Persoff, Lee Marvin. Directed by Michael Curtiz. Color by De Luxe; CinemaScope/2.35:1; 107 mins. ©1961 Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. MPAA #20020. DVD release: 5-20-03 (2.35:1 anamorphic; 4.0 Surround; 107m:16s).

 
 

North to Alaska

20th Century-Fox (1960)
Fox 2007557 (keep case)

John Wayne (Sam McCord), Stewart Granger, Ernie Kovacs, Fabian, Capucine. Directed by Henry Hathaway. Color by De Luxe; CinemaScope/2.35:1; 122 mins. ©1960 Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. MPAA #19724. DVD release: 5-20-03 (2.35:1 anamorphic; 4.0 Surround; 121m:55s).

 
 

The Alamo

United Artists (1960)
MGM 1001270 (keep case)

John Wayne (Col. Davy Crockett), Richard Widmark, Laurence Harvey, Richard Boone, Frankie Avalon. Directed by John Wayne. Technicolor; Todd-AO [65mm/5 perf. vertical/24fps]/2.20:1†; 162 mins. ©1960 The Alamo Co. A “Batjac Production.” MPAA #19635. San Antonio premiere: 206 mins. (with music); TJWF: 197 mins.; copyrighted: 192 mins.; AFI: 190 or 192 mins.; BBFC: 192m:29s. Released at 192 mins., then cut to 167 mins. The restored original director's cut, with overture, intermission and exit music, was released on VHS (click for cover) and LaserDisc by MGM at 202m:05s (191m:31s excluding music; 2.10:1 for LaserDisc and 1.70:1 for VHS); an earlier 172-min. version, including music, was also released on VHS and LaserDisc. DVD release: 12-5-00 (2.20:1 anamorphic; 5.1 Surround; 161m:25s [161m:42s•]). †Boxoffice listed the aspect ratio as 2.55:1 with a running time of 211 minutes. (See notes.)

     
     
     
     
     
     
 
1950's
     

The Horse Soldiers

United Artists (1959)
MGM 1001835 (keep case)

John Wayne (Col. John Marlowe), William Holden, Constance Towers, Judson Pratt, Hoot Gibson. Directed by John Ford. Color by De Luxe; 1.85:1; 119 mins. ©1959 The Mirisch Co., Inc. A “Mahin-Rackin Production.” Co-produced with uncredited Batjac Productions, Inc. [see notes]. MPAA #19244. The UK Region 2/4 PAL DVD (released 3-1-04) is 1.78:1 anamorphic, and is derived from the same print. DVD release: 5-8-01 (1.66:1 non-anamorphic; 2.0 mono; 119m:11s [119m:27s•]). View the aspect ratios of three prints in circulation.

 
 

Rio Bravo

Warner Bros. (1959)
Warner Bros. 11050 (snap case; Region 1/4)

John Wayne (Sheriff John T. Chance), Dean Martin, Ricky Nelson, Angie Dickinson, Walter Brennan. Directed by Howard Hawks. Technicolor; 1.85:1; 141 mins. ©1958 Armada Productions, Inc. MPAA #19034. DVD release: 5-8-01 (1.78:1 anamorphic; 1.0 mono; 140m:55s); 5-22-07: 2-disc special edition (cover shown on hover) and Ultimate Collector's edition (click for cover) from a new transfer (1.78:1 anamorphic; 1.0 mono; 140m:54s; Region 1/2/3/4).

 
 

The Barbarian and the Geisha

20th Century-Fox (1958)
Fox 2278394 (Two 5-disc custom cases with slipcase)

John Wayne (Townsend Harris), Eiko Ando, Sam Jaffe, So Yamamura, Norman Thomson. Directed by John Huston. Color by De Luxe; CinemaScope/2.35:1; 105 mins. ©1958 Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. MPAA #18813. DVD release: 5-8-12 (2.35:1 anamorphic; 4.0 Surround; 104m:48s). Also released on Blu-ray as a solo title (combo pack with DVD) on the same date. Excluding this title, the 10-movie John Wayne Film Collection is comprised of previously released DVDs (no new transfers).

 
 

I Married a Woman

Universal [see notes] (1958)
Not available on DVD

George Gobel, Diana Dors, Adolphe Menjou, Jessie Royce Landis, Nita Talbot, [John Wayne (Leonard and himself) uncredited]. Directed by Hal Kanter. b&w with color sequences (uncredited Technicolor); 1.75:1†; 84 mins. ©1956 RKO Teleradio Pictures, Inc. Produced by Gomalco Productions, Inc. MPAA #18202. Filmed before Legend of the Lost and The Wings of Eagles. TJWF and copyrighted: 84 mins.; AFI: 80 or 84-85 mins.; BBFC: 83m:56s; TCM print: 83m:44s (1.75:1 with color sequences). Released on VHS by VCI (Video Communications, Inc.) and later by its parent company, United Home Video (83m:24s; cover shown) and on LaserDisc (83m:32s [12 seconds of end credits were omitted]; hover for cover) by Image Entertainment, all full-frame [open-matte] without the color sequences. †Boxoffice says 1.85:1. View the aspect ratios of the LaserDisc and TCM print.

 
 

Legend of the Lost

United Artists (1957)
MGM 1004042 (keep case)

John Wayne (Joe January), Sophia Loren, Rossano Brazzi, Kurt Kasznar, Sonia Moser. Directed by Henry Hathaway. Technicolor; Technirama [35mm/8 perf. horizontal/24fps]/2.35:1; 108 mins. ©1957 Batjac Productions Panama, Inc. Co-produced with Robert Haggiag and Dear Film Productions (Italy). MPAA #18842 [see notes]. DVD release: 12-3-02 (2.30:1 anamorphic; 2.0 mono; 108m:08s [108m:24s•]).

 
 

Jet Pilot

Universal [see notes] (1957)
GoodTimes Home Video Corp. 05-81050 (snap case)

John Wayne (Col. Jim Shannon), Janet Leigh, The United States Air Force, Jay C. Flippen, Paul Fix. Directed by Josef von Sternberg. Technicolor; 1.60:1; 113 mins. ©1957 RKO Teleradio Pictures, Inc. Produced by RKO Radio Pictures, Inc. MPAA #14297. Initial principal photography completed early 1950, before Rio Grande. Released by Universal on the 2-disc, 5-movie compilation John Wayne: An American Icon (The Franchise Collection) on 5-30-06 (1.85:1 anamorphic; 2.0 mono; 112m:29s [112m:38s•]; cover shown on hover). DVD release: 2-15-00 [imprint: 2-23-99] (1.85:1 non-anamorphic; 1.0 mono; 112m:29s). Released solo 6-12-12 on Universal's Vault Series DVD-R (click for cover). The LaserDisc and VHS are presented in the film's original uncropped 1.37:1 aspect ratio.

 
 

The Wings of Eagles

MGM (1957)
Warner Bros. 65303 (keep case; Region 1/2/3/4)

John Wayne (Frank W. “Spig” Wead), Dan Dailey, Maureen O'Hara, Ward Bond, Ken Curtis. Directed by John Ford. Metrocolor; 1.85:1; 110 mins. ©1956 Loew's Inc. Produced by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp. MPAA #18317. DVD release: 6-6-06 (1.78:1 anamorphic; 1.0 mono; 110m:09s).

 
 

The Searchers

Warner Bros. (1956)
Warner Bros. 14651 (snap case)

John Wayne (Ethan Edwards), Jeffrey Hunter, Vera Miles, Ward Bond, Natalie Wood. Directed by John Ford. Technicolor; VistaVision [35mm/8 perf. horizontal/24fps]/1.85:1†; 119 mins. ©1956 C.V. Whitney Pictures, Inc. MPAA #17787. DVD release: 10-28-97 (1.78:1 anamorphic and 1.33:1; 1.0 mono; 118m:40s [118m:45s•]); 6-6-06: 2-disc 50th Anniversary edition (click for cover) and 50th Anniversary Ultimate Collector's edition (cover shown on hover) from a new transfer (1.78:1 anamorphic; 1.0 mono; 118m:40s; Region 1/4). †The recommended aspect ratio for VistaVision.

 
 

The Conqueror

RKO (1956)
GoodTimes Home Video Corp. 05-81039 (snap case)

John Wayne (Temujin, later Genghis Khan), Susan Hayward, Pedro Armendariz, Agnes Moorehead, Thomas Gomez. Directed by Dick Powell. Technicolor; CinemaScope/2.35:1 [filmed 2.55:1]; 111 mins. ©1955 RKO Radio Pictures, Inc. MPAA #17046. Filmed before Blood Alley and The Sea Chase. Released by Universal on the 2-disc, 5-movie compilation John Wayne: An American Icon (The Franchise Collection) on 5-30-06 (2.35:1 anamorphic; 2.0 Surround; 110m:58s [111m:18s•]; cover shown on hover). DVD release: 4-27-99 (2.35:1 non-anamorphic; 2.0 Surround; 110m:56s [111m:00s•]). Released solo 6-12-12 on Universal's Vault Series DVD-R (click for cover).

 
 

Blood Alley

Warner Bros. (1955)
Warner Bros. 69227 (keep case; Region 1/2/3/4)

John Wayne (Capt. Tom Wilder), Lauren Bacall, Paul Fix, Joy Kim, Berry Kroger. Directed by William A. Wellman. WarnerColor; CinemaScope/2.55:1; 115 mins. ©1955 Batjac Productions, Inc. MPAA #17459. DVD release: 5-3-05 (2.55:1 anamorphic; 2.0 Surround; 115m:11s).

 
 

The Sea Chase

Warner Bros. (1955)
Warner Bros. 69228 (keep case; Region 1/2/3/4)

John Wayne (Capt. Karl Ehrlich), Lana Turner, David Farrar, Lyle Bettger, Tab Hunter. Directed by John Farrow. WarnerColor; CinemaScope/2.55:1; 117 mins. ©1955 Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. A “Warner Bros.-First National Picture.” MPAA #17276. DVD release: 5-3-05 (2.45:1 anamorphic; 2.0 Surround; 117m:02s).

 
 

The High and the Mighty

Warner Bros. (1954)
Paramount 88763 (2-disc keep case)

John Wayne (Dan Roman), Claire Trevor, Laraine Day, Robert Stack, Jan Sterling. Directed by William A. Wellman. WarnerColor; CinemaScope/2.55:1; 147 mins. ©1954 Wayne-Fellows Productions, Inc. MPAA #16801. DVD release: 8-2-05 (2.50:1 anamorphic; 5.1 and 2.0 Surround; 146m:43s [147m:13s•]).

 
 

Hondo

Warner Bros. (1953)
Paramount 88761 (keep case)

John Wayne (Hondo Lane), Geraldine Page, Ward Bond, Michael Pate, James Arness. Directed by John Farrow. WarnerColor; WarnerVision [dual-strip 3-D, later released 'flat']/1.85:1; 83 mins. ©1952 [sic] Wayne-Fellows Productions, Inc. MPAA #16575. AFI: 80 or 83-84 mins./7,532' [83m:41s]; BBFC: 83m:25s. DVD release: 10-11-05 (1.33:1 [open-matte version]; 5.1 Surround [remixed from mono] and 2.0 mono; 83m:23s [83m:52s•]).

 
 

Island in the Sky

Warner Bros. (1953)
Paramount 02893 (keep case)

John Wayne (Capt. Dooley), Lloyd Nolan, Walter Abel, James Arness, Andy Devine. Directed by William A. Wellman. b&w; 109 mins. ©1953 Wayne-Fellows Productions, Inc. MPAA #16574. DVD release: 8-2-05 (2.0 mono; 109m:12s [109m:32s•]).

 
 

Trouble Along the Way

Warner Bros. (1953)
Warner Bros. 114536 (keep case; Region 1/2/3/4)

John Wayne (Steve Aloysius Williams), Donna Reed, Charles Coburn, Tom Tully, Sherry Jackson. Directed by Michael Curtiz. b&w; 110 mins. ©1953 Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. A “Warner Bros.-First National Picture.” MPAA #16170. DVD release: 5-22-07 (1.0 mono; 109m:56s).

 
 

Big Jim McLain

Warner Bros. (1952)
Warner Bros. 114533 (keep case; Region 1/2/3/4)

John Wayne (Jim McLain), Nancy Olson, James Arness, Alan Napier, Veda Ann Borg. Directed by Edward Ludwig. b&w; 90 mins. ©1952 Wayne-Fellows Productions, Inc. MPAA #16057. DVD release: 5-22-07 (1.0 mono; 89m:48s).

 
 

The Quiet Man

Republic (1952)
Artisan 53361 (keep case)

John Wayne (Sean Thornton), Maureen O'Hara, Barry Fitzgerald, Ward Bond, Victor McLaglen. Directed by John Ford. Technicolor; 129 mins. ©1952 Republic Pictures Corp. An “Argosy Production” (Argosy Pictures Corp.). MPAA #15529. AFI: 11,631' [129m:14s]. DVD release: 2-16-99 (2.0 mono; 129m:04s [129m:11s•]); 10-22-02: collector's edition (3.1 Surround [remixed from mono] and 1.0 mono; 129m:04s [129m:11s•]; cover shown on hover); 1-22-13: Olive Films from a newly mastered print (1.0 mono; 129m:14s [129m:37s•]; click for cover).

 
 

Flying Leathernecks

RKO (1951)
Warner Bros. T6776 (snap case; Region 1/4)

John Wayne (Maj. Daniel Xavier “Dan” Kirby), Robert Ryan, Don Taylor, Janis Carter, Jay C. Flippen. Directed by Nicholas Ray. Technicolor; 102 mins. ©1951 RKO Radio Pictures, Inc. MPAA #14994. DVD release: 5-4-04 (1.0 mono; 102m:09s).

 
 

Operation Pacific

Warner Bros. (1951)
Warner Bros. 24327 (snap case; Region 1/2/3/4)

John Wayne (Lt. Cmdr. Duke E. Gifford), Patricia Neal, Ward Bond, Scott Forbes, Philip Carey. Directed by George Waggner. b&w; 109 mins. ©1951 Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. A “Warner Bros.-First National Picture.” MPAA #14874. TJWF: 111 mins.; AFI: 109-111 mins.; copyrighted: 110 mins. DVD release: 5-13-03 (1.0 mono; 109m:15s).

 
 

Rio Grande

Republic (1950)
Republic 43456 (keep case)

John Wayne (Lt. Col. Kirby Yorke), Maureen O'Hara, Ben Johnson, Claude Jarman, Jr., Harry Carey, Jr. Directed by John Ford. b&w; 105 mins. ©1950 Republic Pictures Corp. An “Argosy Production” (Argosy Pictures Corp.). MPAA #14822. DVD release: 7-14-98 (1.0 mono; 104m:50s); 10-22-02: collector's edition (3.1 Surround [remixed from mono] and 1.0 mono; 104m:53s [105m:02s•]; cover shown on hover); 8-7-12: Olive Films from a newly mastered print (1.0 mono; 104m:53s [105m:24s•]; cover shown on click). The DVD was initially distributed by Republic Entertainment shortly before Artisan Entertainment licensed the Republic library.

     
     
     
     
     
     
 
1940's
     

Sands of Iwo Jima

Republic (1949)
Republic 45570 (keep case)

John Wayne (Sgt. John M. Stryker), John Agar, Adele Mara, Forrest Tucker, Wally Cassell. Directed by Allan Dwan. b&w; 109 mins. ©1949 Republic Pictures Corp. MPAA #14111. DVD release: 7-14-98 (1.0 mono; 109m:22s). The DVD was initially distributed by Republic Entertainment shortly before Artisan Entertainment licensed the Republic library. 11-11-14: Olive Films from a newly mastered print (1.0 mono; 109m:22s [109m:48s•]; cover shown on click).

 
 

The Fighting Kentuckian

Republic (1949)
Artisan 10028 (keep case)

John Wayne (John Breen), Vera Ralston, Philip Dorn, Oliver Hardy, Marie Windsor. Directed by George Waggner. b&w; 100 mins. ©1949 Republic Pictures Corp. A “John Wayne Production” (as producer). MPAA #13803. The DVD has oddball encoding (improperly telecined). DVD release: 11-23-99 (2.0 mono; 99m:53s [100m:11s•]); 9-24-13: Olive Films from a newly mastered print (1.0 mono; 99m:55s [100m:21s•]; cover shown on hover).

 
 

She Wore a Yellow Ribbon

RKO (1949)
Warner Bros. T6423 (snap case; Region 1/4)

John Wayne (Capt. Nathan Cutting Brittles), Joanne Dru, John Agar, Ben Johnson, Harry Carey, Jr. Directed by John Ford. Technicolor; 104 mins. ©1949 Argosy Pictures Corp. MPAA #13509. DVD release: 6-4-02 (1.0 mono; 103m:34s).

 
 

Desert Command

Favorite Films Corp. (1949)
Public Domain (various labels)

John Wayne (Tom Wayne), Ruth Hall, Robert Frazer, Noah Berry, Jr., Creighton Chaney (Lon Chaney, Jr.). Directed by Armand Schaeffer (Schaefer) and Colbert Clark. b&w; 72 mins. ©[none; source originally copyrighted 1933 Mascot Pictures Corp.]. Theatrically released feature version of the 12-chapter Mascot serial The Three Musketeers (filmed in early 1933). View an image explaining why the film is listed as a 1949 release.

 
 

Wake of the Red Witch

Republic (1948)
Artisan 11828 (keep case)

John Wayne (Capt. Ralls), Gail Russell, Gig Young, Adele Mara, Luther Adler. Directed by Edward Ludwig. b&w; 107 mins. ©1948 Republic Pictures Corp. MPAA #13370. AFI: 106 mins./9,482' [105m:21s]; BBFC: 106m:46s. DVD release: 5-22-01 (2.0 mono; 106m:28s [106m:39s•]); 4-23-13: Olive Films from a newly mastered print (1.0 mono; 106m:28s [106m:54s•]; cover shown on hover).

 
 

3 Godfathers

MGM (1948)
Warner Bros. 65182 (keep case; Region 1/2/3/4)

John Wayne (Robert Marmaduke Sangster Hightower), Pedro Armendariz, Harry Carey, Jr., Ward Bond, Mae Marsh. Directed by John Ford. Technicolor; 106 mins. ©1948 Loew's Inc. Produced by Argosy Pictures Corp. A “Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Picture.” MPAA #13312. AFI: 105-107 mins./9,551' [106m:07s]; copyrighted: 105 mins. DVD release: 6-6-06 [imprint: 3-29-04] (1.0 mono; 106m:09s).

 
 

Red River

United Artists (1948)
MGM 906042 (keep case)

John Wayne (Thomas Dunson), Montgomery Clift, Joanne Dru, Walter Brennan, Colleen Gray. Directed by Howard Hawks and Arthur Rosson. b&w; 133 mins. ©1947 Monterey Productions. MPAA #12398. Principal photography completed before Fort Apache and Tycoon (additional scenes were filmed for Red River just after the completion of Tycoon). AFI: 11,363' [126m:15s]. Restored to 133 mins. in 1987. DVD release: 11-18-97 (2.0 mono; 132m:35s [132m:38s•]); 5-27-14: Criterion Collection from newly mastered prints (1.0 mono; 126m:19s [126m:57s•], pre-release version: 132m:38s [133m:16s•]; cover shown on hover).

 
 

Fort Apache

RKO (1948)
Warner Bros. T7510 (keep case; Region 1/4)

John Wayne (Capt. Kirby York), Henry Fonda, Shirley Temple, Pedro Armendariz, Ward Bond. Directed by John Ford. b&w; 128 mins. ©1948 Argosy Pictures Corp. MPAA #12819. DVD release: 6-6-06 (1.0 mono; 127m:42s).

 
 

Tycoon

RKO (1947)
Warner Bros. T7865 (keep case; Region 1/3/4)

John Wayne (Johnny Munroe), Laraine Day, Sir Cedric Hardwicke, Judith Anderson, James Gleason. Directed by Richard Wallace. Technicolor; 129 mins. ©1947 RKO Radio Pictures, Inc. MPAA #12261. TJWF and copyrighted: 130 mins.; AFI: 126, 128 or 130 mins./11,692' [129m:54s]; BBFC: 128m:59s. DVD release: 5-22-07 (1.0 mono; 128m:51s).

 
 

Angel and the Badman

Republic (1947)
Olive Films OF699 (keep case)

John Wayne (Quirt Evans), Gail Russell, Harry Carey, Bruce Cabot, Irene Rich. Directed by James Edward Grant. b&w; 100 mins. ©1946 Republic Pictures Corp. A “John Wayne Production” (as producer for uncredited Patnel Productions). MPAA #11847. Although in the public domain, the film had previously never been officially released on DVD except for Region 2/4 by Universal UK in 2006. DVD release: 7-30-13 (1.0 mono; 99m:33s [100m:00s•]). View a comparison video here.

 
 

Without Reservations

RKO (1946)
Warner Bros. T7866 (keep case; Region 1/3/4)

Claudette Colbert, John Wayne (Rusty Thomas), Don DeFore, Anne Triola, Phil Brown. Directed by Mervyn LeRoy. b&w; 101 mins. ©1946 Jesse L. Lasky Productions, Inc. MPPDA #11262. TJWF and copyrighted: 107 mins.; AFI: 105 or 107 mins.; BBFC: 106m:45s. The 2003 UK DVD released 6-14-04 by DD Video [Leisure View Video] (2.0 mono; 106m:33s; Region 0 PAL; cover shown on hover) is the complete film unlike the American VHS, LaserDisc, TCM print (all 100m:24s) and DVD. DVD release: 5-22-07 (1.0 mono; 100m:43s).

 
 

They Were Expendable

MGM (1945)
MGM 907661 (keep case)

Robert Montgomery, John Wayne (Lt. “Rusty” Ryan), Donna Reed, Jack Holt, Ward Bond. Directed by John Ford. b&w; 135 mins. ©1945 Loew's Inc. Produced by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp. MPPDA #11113. Filmed before Dakota. DVD release: 5-18-99 (2.0 mono; 134m:47s).

 
 

Dakota

Republic (1945)
Artisan 12544 (keep case)

John Wayne (John Devlin), Vera Hruba Ralston, Walter Brennan, Ward Bond, Mike Mazurki. Directed by Joseph Kane. b&w; 82 mins. ©1945 Republic Pictures Corp. MPPDA #11126. TJWF: 82 mins.; AFI: 81-82 mins./7,328' [81m:25s]; BBFC: 84m:17s; BFI: 7,340' [81m:33s]. The DVD is hard-telecined. DVD release: 5-21-02 (2.0 mono; 81m:40s). To be released on Blu-ray by Kino on March 28, 2017.

 
 

Back to Bataan

RKO (1945)
Warner Bros. T6775 (snap case; Region 1/2/3/4)

John Wayne (Col. Joseph Madden), Anthony Quinn, Beulah Bondi, Fely Franquelli, Richard Loo. Directed by Edward Dmytryk. b&w; 95 mins. ©1945 RKO Radio Pictures, Inc. MPPDA #10576. TJWF: 94-97 mins.; AFI: 95 or 97 mins./8,505' [94m:30s]; BBFC: 94m:37s; copyrighted: 95 mins. DVD release: 5-4-04 (1.0 mono; 94m:28s).

 
 

Flame of Barbary Coast    UK: Flame of the Barbary Coast

Republic (1945)
Artisan 13600 (keep case)

John Wayne (Duke Fergus), Ann Dvorak, Joseph Schildkraut, William Frawley, Virginia Grey. Directed by Joseph Kane. b&w; 91 mins. ©1945 Republic Pictures Corp. MPPDA #10403. DVD release: 1-21-03 (2.0 mono; 90m:52s [90m:56s•]); 6-18-13: Olive Films from a newly mastered print (1.0 mono; 90m:57s [91m:24s•]; cover shown on hover).

 
 

Tall in the Saddle

RKO (1944)
Warner Bros. T6990 (keep case; Region 1/2/3/4)

John Wayne (Rocklin), Ella Raines, Ward Bond, George “Gabby” Hayes, Audrey Long. Directed by Edwin L. Marin. b&w; 87 mins. ©1944 RKO Radio Pictures, Inc. MPPDA #10109. DVD release: 5-3-05 (1.0 mono; 86m:53s [87m:09s•]).

 
 

The Fighting Seabees

Republic (1944)
Artisan 10999 (keep case)

John Wayne (Wedge Donovan), Susan Hayward, Dennis O'Keefe, William Frawley, Leonid Kinskey. Directed by Edward Ludwig. b&w; 100 mins. ©1944 Republic Pictures Corp. MPPDA #9802. AFI: 100 mins./8,965' [99m:36s]; BBFC: 99m:43s. DVD release: 5-16-00 (2.0 mono; 99m:21s [99m:27s•]); 4-23-13: Olive Films from a newly mastered print (1.0 mono; 99m:30s [100m:00s•]; cover shown on hover).

 
 

In Old Oklahoma

Republic (1943)
Olive Films OF613 (keep case)

John Wayne (Daniel F. “Dan” Somers), Martha Scott, Albert Dekker, George “Gabby” Hayes, Marjorie Rambeau. Directed by Albert S. Rogell. b&w; 102 mins. ©1943 Republic Pictures Corp. MPPDA #9542. AFI: 102 mins./9,204' [102m:16s]; BBFC: 101m:54s; BFI: 9,191' [102m:07s]. Retitled War of the Wildcats in 1945. DVD release: 4-23-13 (1.0 mono; 101m:54s [102m:21s•]).

 
 

A Lady Takes a Chance

RKO (1943)
Artisan 13602 (keep case)

Jean Arthur, John Wayne (Duke Hudkins), Charles Winninger, Phil Silvers, Mary Field. Directed by William A. Seiter. b&w; 86 mins. ©1943 Frank Ross, Inc. MPPDA #9088. AFI: 85-86 mins./8,952' [99m:28s]; BBFC: 85m:53s; BFI: 7,729' [85m:52s]. Reissued in 1954 as The Cowboy and the Girl. DVD release: 1-21-03 (2.0 mono; 85m:39s). The DVD is derived from a video master with oddball encoding (improperly telecined). The UK Region 2 PAL DVD released 5-31-04 by Second Sight Films, from a different print, is of marginally better quality and encoded progressively (same running time; cover shown on hover). View the UK DVD and Italian region-free DVD, which is the same print as the former except with a lower bitrate. (See notes.)

 
 

Reunion in France    UK: Mademoiselle France (reissued under its American title)

MGM (1942)
Warner Bros. 79735 (keep case; Region 1/2/3/4)

Joan Crawford, John Wayne (Pat Talbot), Philip Dorn, Reginald Owen, Albert Bassermann. Directed by Jules Dassin. b&w; 104 mins. ©1942 Loew's Inc. Produced by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp. MPPDA #8877. Filmed before Pittsburgh. Copyrighted and previewed under its working title, Reunion. TJWF: 104 mins.; AFI: 101 mins./9,339' [103m:46s]; BBFC: 103m:50s; TCM print: 98m:44s. DVD release: 5-22-07 (1.0 mono; 103m:51s).

 
 

Pittsburgh

Universal (1942)
Universal 26557 (2-disc keep case with slipcase; 5-movie compilation)

Marlene Dietrich, Randolph Scott, John Wayne (Charles “Pittsburgh” Markham aka Charles Ellis), Frank Craven, Louise Allbritton. Directed by Lewis Seiler. b&w; 91 mins. ©1942 Universal Pictures Co., Inc. A “Charles K. Feldman [Group] Production.” MPPDA #8960. TJWF: 98 mins.; AFI: 91 or 93 mins./8,191' [91m:00s]; BBFC: 91m:20s. DVD release: 5-30-06 (2.0 mono; 91m:12s). Released solo 4-25-11 on Universal's Vault Series DVD-R (cover shown on hover). (See notes.)

 
 

Flying Tigers

Republic (1942)
Artisan 10998 (keep case)

John Wayne (Capt. Jim Gordon), John Carroll, Anna Lee, Paul Kelly, Gordon Jones. Directed by David Miller. b&w; 101 mins. ©1942 Republic Pictures Corp. MPPDA #8468. AFI: 98, 100 or 102 mins./9,141' [101m:34s]. DVD release: 5-16-00 (2.0 mono; 101m:20s [101m:26s•]); 5-13-14: Olive Films from a newly mastered print (1.0 mono; 101m:20s [101m:45s•]; cover shown on hover).

 
 

In Old California

Republic (1942)
Artisan 10029 (keep case)

John Wayne (Tom “Boston” Craig), Binnie Barnes, Albert Dekker, Helen Parrish, Patsy Kelly. Directed by William McGann. b&w; 88 mins. ©1942 Republic Pictures Corp. MPPDA #8280. TJWF: 88 mins.; AFI: 88 mins./7,886' [87m:37s]; BBFC: 90m:11s. DVD release: 11-23-99 (2.0 mono; 87m:33s [87m:36s•]); 5-28-13: Olive Films from a newly mastered print (1.0 mono; 87m:33s [87m:59s•]; cover shown on hover).

 
 

The Spoilers

Universal (1942)
Universal 23136 (keep case)

Marlene Dietrich, Randolph Scott, John Wayne (Roy Glennister), Margaret Lindsay, Harry Carey. Directed by Ray Enright. b&w; 87 mins. ©1942 Universal Pictures Co., Inc. Produced by Frank Lloyd Productions, Inc.; a “Charles K. Feldman Group Production.” MPPDA #8269. Universal's 3-disc, 5-movie John Wayne: Screen Legend Collection released 6-12-07 (2.0 mono; 87m:09s; cover shown on hover) has a sharper print. DVD release: 6-1-04 (2.0 mono; 87m:09s).

 
 

Reap the Wild Wind

Paramount (1942)
Universal 20437 (keep case)

Ray Milland, John Wayne (Capt. Jack Stuart), Paulette Goddard, Raymond Massey, Robert Preston. Directed by Cecil B. DeMille. Technicolor; 123 mins. ©1941 Paramount Pictures, Inc. MPPDA #7468. AFI: 124 mins./11,094' [123m:16s]. Filmed before Lady for a Night. Universal's 3-disc, 5-movie John Wayne: Screen Legend Collection released 6-12-07 (2.0 mono; 123m:16s [123m:41s•]; cover shown on hover) has a remastered print on a dual-layer disc (the original is single layer). DVD release: 12-15-98 (2.0 mono; 123m:16s [123m:20s•]).

 
 

Lady for a Night

Republic (1942)
Olive Films OF547 (keep case)

Joan Blondell, John Wayne (Jackson “Jack” Morgan), Philip Merivale, Blanche Yurka, Ray Middleton. Directed by Leigh Jason. b&w; 87 mins. ©1942 Republic Pictures Corp. MPPDA #7794. TJWF: 89 mins.; AFI: 87-88 mins./7,857' [87m:18s]; BBFC: 90m:07s; BFI: 87m:44s. DVD release: 2-26-13 (1.0 mono; 87m:16s [87m:46s•]).

 
 

The Shepherd of the Hills

Paramount (1941)
Universal 26557 (2-disc keep case with slipcase; 5-movie compilation)

John Wayne (Young Matt), Betty Field, Harry Carey, Beulah Bondi, James Barton. Directed by Henry Hathaway. Technicolor; 98 mins. ©1941 Paramount Pictures, Inc. MPPDA #7339. Filmed before Lady from Louisiana and A Man Betrayed. AFI: 98 mins./9,946' [110m:30s]; BFI: 8,769' [97m:26s]. DVD release: 5-30-06 (2.0 mono; 97m:27s). Released solo 6-12-12 on Universal's Vault Series DVD-R (cover shown on hover).

 
 

Lady from Louisiana

Republic (1941)
Olive Films OF631 (keep case)

John Wayne (John Reynolds), Ona Munson, Ray Middleton, Henry Stephenson, Helen Westley. Directed by Bernard Vorhaus. b&w; 83 mins. ©1941 Republic Pictures Corp. MPPDA #7207. TJWF: 84 mins.; AFI: 82 mins./7,418' [82m:25s]; BBFC: 85m:16s; BFI: 7,446' [82m:44s]. DVD release: 5-28-13 (1.0 mono; 82m:27s [82m:55s•]).

 
 

A Man Betrayed    UK: Citadel of Crime

Republic (1941)
Olive Films OF575 (keep case)

John Wayne (Lynn Hollister), Frances Dee, Edward Ellis, Wallace Ford, Ward Bond. Directed by John H. Auer. b&w; 82 mins. ©1941 Republic Pictures Corp. MPPDA #7055. TJWF: 83 mins.; AFI: 80 or 82 mins./7,365' [81m:50s]; BBFC: 84m:18s; BFI: 7,385' [82m:03s]. Released on videocassette under its 1955 television title, Wheel of Fortune. DVD release: 3-26-13 (1.0 mono; 81m:31s [81m:57s•]).

 
 

Seven Sinners    UK reissue: Café of Seven Sinners

Universal (1940)
Universal 26557 (2-disc keep case with slipcase; 5-movie compilation)

Marlene Dietrich, John Wayne (Lt. Dan Brent), Albert Dekker, Broderick Crawford, Anna Lee. Directed by Tay Garnett. b&w; 87 mins. ©1940 Universal Pictures Co., Inc. MPPDA #6795. DVD release: 5-30-06 (2.0 mono; 86m:33s). Released solo 4-25-11 on Universal's Vault Series DVD-R (cover shown on hover).

 
 

The Long Voyage Home

United Artists (1940)
Warner Bros. 75641 (keep case)

John Wayne (Ole Olsen), Thomas Mitchell, Ian Hunter, Barry Fitzgerald, Wilfrid Lawson. Directed by John Ford. b&w; 105 mins. ©1940 Walter Wanger Productions, Inc. Produced by Argosy Corp. MPPDA #6410. TJWF: 103-105 mins.; AFI: 103 mins.; BBFC: 104m:27s; BFI: 9,406' [104m:30s]. The DVD is derived from a 1948 re-release print issued by Masterpiece Productions, Inc., which has entirely new credits: first-billed are John Wayne, Barry Fitzgerald, Thomas Mitchell, Ian Hunter and John Qualen. The LaserDisc, probably sourced from the original release print, runs 104m:59s. DVD release: 6-6-06 (1.0 mono; 105m:12s [105m:28s•]).

 
 

Three Faces West

Republic (1940)
Lions Gate 12973 (keep case)

John Wayne (John Phillips), Sigrid Gurie, Charles Coburn, Spencer Charters, Helen MacKellar. Directed by Bernard Vorhaus. b&w; 79 mins. ©1940 Republic Pictures Corp. MPPDA #6239. TJWF: 79-81 mins.; AFI: 79 or 81 mins.; BBFC: 81m:14s. DVD release: 5-11-04 (2.0 Surround [mono]; 78m:37s [78m:40s•]); 4-30-13: Olive Films from a newly mastered print (1.0 mono; 78m:39s [79m:05s•]; cover shown on hover).

 
 

Dark Command

Republic (1940)
Artisan 10030 (keep case)

Claire Trevor, John Wayne (Bob “Shortcut” Seton), Walter Pidgeon, Roy Rogers, George Hayes. Directed by Raoul Walsh. b&w; 93 mins. ©1940 Republic Pictures Corp. MPPDA #5985. TJWF: 94 mins.; AFI: 92-94 mins.; BBFC: 95m:22s; BFI: 8,347' [92m:44s]. DVD release: 11-23-99 (2.0 mono; 93m:20s); 5-28-13: Olive Films from a newly mastered print (1.0 mono; 93m:20s [93m:46s•]; cover shown on hover).

     
     
     
     
     
     
 
1930's
     

Allegheny Uprising    UK: The First Rebel

RKO (1939)
Warner Bros. T7864 (keep case; Region 1/3/4)

Claire Trevor, John Wayne (James “Jim” Smith), George Sanders, Brian Donlevy, Wilfrid Lawson. Directed by William A. Seiter. b&w; 81 mins. ©1939 RKO Radio Pictures, Inc. MPPDA #5538. DVD release: 5-22-07 (1.0 mono; 80m:30s).

 
 

 

 

A list of copyright renewals for Wayne's 1935–1939 Republic films

 

 

New Frontier

Republic (1939)
Olive Films OF523 (keep case)

John Wayne (Stony Brooke), Ray Corrigan, Raymond Hatton, Phylis Isley (Jennifer Jones), Eddy Waller. Directed by George Sherman. b&w; 55 mins. ©1939 Republic Pictures Corp. MPPDA #5520. TJWF: 56 mins.; AFI: 56-57 mins./4,946' [54m:57s]; BBFC: 56m:45s; BFI: 4,991' [55m:27s]. DVD release: 1-22-13 (1.0 mono; 54m:57s [55m:23s•]). Although appearing with artwork of the film's 1953 television title, Frontier Horizon, the credits show the original title.

 
 

Wyoming Outlaw

Republic (1939)
Olive Films OF585 (keep case)

John Wayne (Stony Brooke), Ray Corrigan, Raymond Hatton, Donald Barry, Adele Pearce. Directed by George Sherman. b&w; 56 mins. ©1939 Republic Pictures Corp. MPPDA #5415. TJWF: 56-62 mins.; AFI: 56 or 58 mins.; BBFC: 57m:27s; 1940 Kinematograph Year Book: 4,947' [54m:58s]. DVD release: 3-26-13 (1.0 mono; 56m:02s [56m:28s•]).

 
 

Three Texas Steers    UK: Danger Rides the Range

Republic (1939)
Olive Films OF477 (keep case)

John Wayne (Stony Brooke), Ray Corrigan, Max Terhune, Carole Landis, Ralph Graves. Directed by George Sherman. b&w; 56 mins. ©1938 [sic] Republic Pictures Corp. MPPDA #5251. TJWF: 57 mins.; AFI: 56-57 mins./5,050' [56m:06s]; BBFC: 55m:58s. DVD release: 10-2-12 (1.0 mono; 55m:52s [56m:18s•]).

 
 

The Night Riders

Republic (1939)
Olive Films OF471 (keep case)

John Wayne (Stony Brooke), Ray Corrigan, Max Terhune, Doreen McKay, Ruth Rogers. Directed by George Sherman. b&w; 56 mins. ©1938 [sic] Republic Pictures Corp. MPPDA #5176. TJWF: 57 mins.; AFI: 58 mins.; 1940 Kinematograph Year Book: 5,033' [55m:55s]. DVD release: 10-2-12 (1.0 mono; 55m:45s [56m:11s•]).

 
 

Stagecoach

United Artists (1939)
Warner Bros. 35078 (snap case)

Claire Trevor, John Wayne (The Ringo Kid), Andy Devine, John Carradine, Thomas Mitchell. Directed by John Ford. b&w; 96 mins. ©1939 Walter Wanger Productions, Inc. MPPDA #5029. TJWF: 105 mins.; AFI: 95-96 mins. DVD release: 10-28-97 (1.0 mono; 95m:47s [96m:09s•]); 6-6-06: 2-disc special edition (1.0 mono; 95m:49s [95m:52s•]; cover shown on hover). Released 5-25-10 by Criterion from a different print source (1.0 mono; 95m:50s [96m:05s•]; click for cover), and on Blu-ray.

 
 

Red River Range

Republic (1938)
Olive Films OF475 (keep case)

John Wayne (Stony Brooke), Ray Corrigan, Max Terhune, Polly Moran, Lorna Gray. Directed by George Sherman. b&w; 56 mins. ©1938 Republic Pictures Corp. MPPDA #4857. TJWF: 56 mins.; AFI: 55-56 mins./5,018' [55m:45s]; 1940 Kinematograph Year Book: 5,016' [55m:44s]. DVD release: 10-2-12 (1.0 mono; 55m:43s [56m:09s•]).

 
 

Santa Fe Stampede

Republic (1938)
Lions Gate 15985 (keep case)

John Wayne (Stony Brooke), Ray Corrigan, Max Terhune, June Martel, William Farnum. Directed by George Sherman. b&w; 55 mins. ©1938 Republic Pictures Corp. MPPDA #4788. AFI: 56 mins./4,982' [55m:21s]; 1940 Kinematograph Year Book: 4,979' [55m:19s]. DVD release: 5-11-04 (2.0 Surround [mono]; 55m:20s [55m:22s•]); 4-23-13: Olive Films from a newly mastered print (1.0 mono; 55m:22s [55m:48s•]; cover shown on hover).

 
 

Overland Stage Raiders

Republic (1938)
Olive Films OF473 (keep case)

John Wayne (Stony Brooke), Ray Corrigan, Max Terhune, Louise Brooks, Anthony Marsh. Directed by George Sherman. b&w; 55 mins. ©1938 Republic Pictures Corp. MPPDA #4602. AFI: 55 mins./4,941' [54m:54s]; 1940 Kinematograph Year Book: 4,911' [54m:34s]; BFI: 4,941' [54m:54s]. DVD release: 10-2-12 (1.0 mono; 54m:31s [54m:57s•]).

 
 

Pals of the Saddle

Republic (1938)
Olive Films OF639 (keep case)

John Wayne (Stony Brooke), Ray Corrigan, Max Terhune, Doreen McKay, Josef Forte. Directed by George Sherman. b&w; 55 mins. ©1938 Republic Pictures Corp. MPPDA #4518. TJWF: 55 mins.; AFI: 55 mins./4,933' [54m:48s]; 1940 Kinematograph Year Book: 5,027' [55m:51s]. DVD release: 4-30-13 (1.0 mono; 54m:24s [54m:50s•]).

 
 

Born to the West

Paramount (1937)
Public Domain (various labels)

John Wayne (Dare Rudd), Marsha Hunt, John Mack Brown, John Patterson, Monte Blue. Directed by Charles Barton. b&w; 55 mins. ©1937 Paramount Pictures, Inc. MPPDA #3706. TJWF: 51-59 mins.; AFI: 52, 59 or 66 mins.; 1939 Kinematograph Year Book: 4,535' [50m:23s]; copyrighted: 6 reels. Available on various labels under the reissue title Hell Town, released by Favorite Films Corp. in October 1950 (poster shown on hover). Although in the public domain, the closest official release of the film is a 1994 LaserDisc (55m:15s) released by The Roan Group which was sanctioned by Zane Grey, Inc., owner the literary rights. View an image of two different title cards.

 
 

Adventure's End

Universal (1937)
Not Available

John Wayne (Duke Slade), Diana Gibson, Montagu Love, Moroni Olsen, Maurice Black. Directed by Arthur Lubin. b&w; 63 mins. ©1937 Universal Pictures Co., Inc. Produced for Universal by Trem Carr Inc. MPPDA #3546. TJWF: 63 mins.; AFI: 60 or 63 mins.; BBFC: 63m:25s; 1939 Kinematograph Year Book: 5,588' [62m:05s]; copyrighted: 7 reels. This is not a 'lost' film as many believe.

 
 
 

Idol of the Crowds

Universal (1937)
Not available on DVD

John Wayne (Johnny Hansen), Sheila Bromley (Mannors), Billy Burrud, Russell Hopton, Huntley Gordon. Directed by Arthur Lubin. b&w; 63 mins. ©1937 Universal Pictures Co., Inc. Produced for Universal by Trem Carr Inc. MPPDA #3520. TJWF: 60 mins.; AFI: 60 or 62-62.5 mins.; 1938 Kinematograph Year Book: 5,664' [62m:56s]; copyrighted: 6 reels.

 
 
 

I Cover the War

Universal (1937)
Not available on DVD

John Wayne (Bob Adams), Gwen Gaze, Don Barkley (Barclay), Charles Brokaw, James Bush. Directed by Arthur Lubin. b&w; 69 mins. ©1937 Universal Pictures Co., Inc. Produced for Universal by Trem Carr Inc. MPPDA #3302. TJWF: 65 mins.; AFI: 65 or 68-69 mins.; 1938 Kinematograph Year Book: 6,213' [69m:02s]; copyrighted: 7 reels.

 
 
 

California Straight Ahead

Universal (1937)
Not available on DVD

John Wayne (Biff Smith), Louise Latimer, Robert McWade, Theodore von Eltz, Tully Marshall. Directed by Arthur Lubin. b&w; 69 mins. ©1937 Universal Pictures Co., Inc. Produced for Universal by Trem Carr Inc. MPPDA #3111. TJWF: 65-67 mins.; AFI: 57 or 67 mins.; BBFC: 68m:46s; 1938 Kinematograph Year Book: 6,179' [68m:39s]; copyrighted: 7 reels.

 
 
 

Conflict

Universal (1936)
Not available on DVD

John Wayne (Pat Glendon), Jean Rogers, Tommy Bupp, Frank Sheridan, Ward Bond. Directed by David Howard. b&w; 61 mins. ©1936 Universal Productions, Inc. Produced for Universal by Trem Carr Inc. MPPDA #2713. AFI: 60-61 mins.; 1938 Kinematograph Year Book: 5,528' [61m:25s]; copyrighted: 6 reels.

 
 
 

Sea Spoilers

Universal (1936)
Not available on DVD

John Wayne ('Bos'n' Bob Randall), Nan Grey, William Bakewell, Fuzzy Knight, Russell Hicks. Directed by Frank Strayer. b&w; 63 mins. ©1936 Universal Productions, Inc. Produced for Universal by Trem Carr Inc. MPPDA #2474. AFI: 62-63 mins.; 1937 Kinematograph Year Book: 5,664' [62m:56s]; copyrighted: 7 reels. View the copyright renewals of the six Universal titles.

 
 
 

Winds of the Wasteland

Republic (1936)
Public Domain (various labels)

John Wayne (John Blair), Phyllis Fraser, Lew Kelly, Douglas Cosgrove, Lane Chandler. Directed by Mack V. Wright. b&w; 54 mins. ©1936 Republic Pictures Corp. MPPDA #2316. TJWF: 57 mins.; AFI: 53 mins.; 1938 Kinematograph Year Book: 5,003' [55m:35s]. Released on VHS by Republic (cover shown; 53m:48s). View the VHS, the GoodTimes DVD and the Legend Films DVD.

 
 

The Lonely Trail

Republic (1936)
Olive Films OF629 (keep case)

John Wayne (Capt. John Ashley), Ann Rutherford, Cy Kendall, Bob Kortman, Snowflake. Directed by Joseph Kane. b&w; 56 mins. ©1936 Republic Pictures Corp. MPPDA #2213. TJWF: 57 mins.; AFI: 55-56 or 58 mins.; 1938 Kinematograph Year Book: 5,345' [59m:23s]; BFI: 5,162' [57m:21s]. DVD release: 4-30-13 (1.0 mono; 55m:55s [56m:21s•]).

 
 

King of the Pecos

Republic (1936)
Artisan 12042 (keep case)

John Wayne (John Clayborn), Muriel Evans, Cy Kendall, Jack Clifford, Arthur Aylsworth (Aylesworth). Directed by Joseph Kane. b&w; 55 mins. ©1936 Republic Pictures Corp. TJWF: 56 mins.; AFI: 54 mins.; 1938 Kinematograph Year Book: 5,051' [56m:07s]. DVD release: 10-23-01 (2.0 mono; 54m:31s [54m:34s•]); 1-22-13: Olive Films from a newly mastered print (1.0 mono; 54m:30s [54m:56s•]; cover shown on hover).

 
 

The Lawless Nineties

Republic (1936)
Olive Films OF573 (keep case)

John Wayne (John Tipton), Ann Rutherford, Harry Woods, George Hayes, Al Bridge. Directed by Joseph Kane. b&w; 56 mins. ©1936 Republic Pictures Corp. TJWF: 55 mins.; AFI: 55 or 57-58 mins.; 1937 Kinematograph Year Book: 5,161' [57m:20s]. DVD release: 3-26-13 (1.0 mono; 55m:43s [56m:08s•]).

 
 

The Oregon Trail

Republic (1936)
No print known to exist

John Wayne (Capt. John Delmont), Ann Rutherford, Joe Girard, Yakima Canutt, Frank Rice. Directed by Scott Pembroke. b&w; 59 mins. ©1936 Republic Pictures Corp. AFI: 59 mins.; 1937 Kinematograph Year Book: 5,131' [57m:00s].

 
 
 

Lawless Range

Republic (1935)
Public Domain (various labels)

John Wayne (John Middleton), Sheila Mannors, Frank McGlynn, Jr., Jack Curtis, Wally Howe. Directed by R.[obert] N. Bradbury. b&w; 53 mins. ©1935 Republic Pictures Corp. Filmed before The New Frontier. TJWF: 55 mins.; AFI: 59 mins./4,794' [53m:16s]; 1938 Kinematograph Year Book: 4,938' [54m:52s]. Released on VHS by Republic (cover shown; 52m:51s). View the VHS and copyright notes.

 
 

The New Frontier

Republic (1935)
Olive Films OF519 (keep case)

John Wayne (John Dawson), Muriel Evans, Warner Richmond, Alan Bridge, Sam Flint. Directed by Carl L. Pierson. b&w; 54 mins. ©1935 Republic Pictures Corp. TJWF: 59 mins.; AFI: 54 or 59 mins.; 1937 Kinematograph Year Book: 5,056' [56m:10s]. DVD release: 1-22-13 (1.0 mono; 54m:25s [54m:51s•]).

 
 

Westward Ho

Republic (1935)
Lions Gate 14674 (keep case)

John Wayne (John Wyatt), Sheila Mannors, Frank McGlynn, Jr., James Farley, Jack Curtis. Directed by R.[obert] N. Bradbury. b&w; 61 mins. ©1935 Republic Pictures Corp. TJWF: 63 mins.; AFI: 60 or 65 mins.; 1936 Kinematograph Year Book: 5,536' [61m:30s]; copyrighted: 7 reels. DVD release: 5-11-04 [imprint: 9-9-03] (2.0 Surround [mono]; 60m:35s [60m:56s•]); 3-26-13: Olive Films from a newly mastered print (1.0 mono; 60m:50s [61m:16s•]; cover shown on hover). (See notes.)

 

 

 

 

A common question asked by John Wayne collectors is who distributes the best quality prints of the Monogram titles made under the Lone Star banner, since the sixteen-film series is notorious for the substandard quality found on most labels.

Organized in 1931 by W. Ray Johnston, Monogram's origins go back to Rayart Pictures, formed in 1924 with Johnston's partner, Trem Carr. In mid-1935 the company formed the basis for a new entity, Republic Pictures Corp., which although also absorbing Mascot, Majestic, and Liberty, the core of the new company was Monogram itself, whose corporate and production personnel remained intact.

Paul Malvern, with Monogram since its inception in 1931, was the company's production manager for westerns. Besides producing other genres, Malvern, a former stuntman, produced John Wayne's sixteen Lone Star titles and would helm his next three for Republic, although no longer under the Lone Star banner.

After John Wayne signed a contract, taking effect on June 1, 1933, to make a series of eight western for Monogram, The Hollywood Reporter stated on June 20, 1933, that a new company will make the films for Monogram: “With Paul Malvern as production head, Lone Star Productions has been organized to produce a series of eight westerns, starring John Wayne. Malvern has been in charge of the two series of eight westerns released by Monogram Pictures in the past year. Physical distribution of the new series will be handled by Monogram exchanges in southern, middle western, western and New England territories, although the new company will have no connection with the Monogram feature series and its product will be sold entirely under the Lone Star banner. Production headquarters will be at the Western Service Studios.

Four days later, The Film Daily reported: “Lone Star Productions has established headquarters at the Western Service Studios' Metropolitan lot. Paul Malvern is production head. The company will have no connection with Monogram, pictures being sold by the contracting franchise holders under the Lone Star banner.”

Although apparently never registered as a corporate name, Lone Star Productions were Monogram product, with all but four of the films copyrighted by the company (the last four in the series were not registered).

So even though Lone Star was essentially a production unit at Monogram, distribution arrangements for the series were distinct from others the company made and, more importantly, Wayne had signed his one-year, eight-picture contract with Trem Carr Pictures, not Monogram itself. The contract had an option for renewal, and on May 10, 1934, The Film Daily reported: “Paul Malvern has taken up the option of John Wayne for eight more Lone Star westerns to be distributed by Monogram.”

In the book John Wayne: American, the authors wrote: “[Trem] Carr put veteran producer Paul Malvern in charge of the films and released them under Monogram's Lone Star Productions label, a name that was used only because of its associations with Texas and the West.” It was, however, more than a name. Even upon reissue, the films' advertising rarely displayed the Monogram name, usually showing A LONE STAR WESTERN RE-RELEASE.

Due to infighting with Republic's boss, Herbert J. Yates, W. Ray Johnston and Trem Carr left the company and revived Monogram in November 1936. With the revival, the Lone Star westerns remained in the hands of the new Monogram and not Republic.

Because the films are in the public domain, the original negatives, once owned by Monogram but now in the hands of New York-based Films Around the World, Inc., were modified with music in 1985 so they could be re-copyrighted, a joint venture between Fox/Lorber Associates, Inc. and Classics Associates, Inc. (Only Rainbow Valley escaped a new version.)

The origins of Films Around the World goes back to DuWorld Pictures Corp., created in 1934, with Irvin Shapiro, a former publicist and booker with RKO, as general manager. In 1936 Shapiro would create his own company, World Pictures Corp., distributing mostly foreign films and short subjects. In 1951 he formed Unity Television Corp. along with Arthur A. “Archie” Mayers, formerly World Pictures sales manager and president of DuWorld Pictures.

Unity would become a pioneering company in film sales to television, amassing a large film library through Shapiro's previous companies, Film Equities Corp., Standard Television Corp., and General Television Corp. (among others), and by 1953 had 300 features and 22 serials, along with other material such as cartoons and shorts.

Unity Television eventually would became part of Screen Gems, the television subsidiary of Columbia. Soon after, in 1956, Films Around the World, Inc. was formed by Shapiro, who had sold his shares in Unity and continued on in the distribution business until 1984, when health problems forced him to retire. The business was then sold and became Classics Associates, Inc., later retaining its original name of Films Around the World, Inc.

 

The Lone Star westerns released on VHS by Republic Pictures Home Video in the 1990's, the bulk of them with Columbia and UTE catalog numbers, the latter most likely Unity Television.

 

Boxoffice, January 18, 1947:

Trio Will Distribute Wayne Westerns

ATLANTA—United States and Canadian rights to 16 John Wayne westerns originally produced by Trem Carr for Monogram have been acquired from Monogram by Greater [sic] Western Pictures, Inc., created here with John W. Mangham as president; John L. Franconi, vice-president; J. Francis White Jr., secretary-treasurer, and Joy Houck, director.

Mangham will be eastern sales manager, White central sales manager, and Franconi western sales manager.

Distribution for Charlotte, Atlanta, Memphis, New Orleans and Dallas will be handled through the present exchanges of the officers. Other territories will be offered on a states rights basis to other distributors.

The deal includes 35 and 16mm rights and television possibilities. Eight of the 16 subjects will go into immediate distribution for the remainder of the 1947 season, with the second eight to follow at a practicable time.

Mangham and Franconi, as former Monogram distributors, have had previous experience with the values of these subjects both to the exchanges and to the exhibitors.

Commenting on the deal, Mangham said: “These subjects were successful when first released. Since then the stature of John Wayne has grown both with the trade and the public. We anticipate early placement of distribution deals in all territories with resultant profits to distributors and exhibitors alike.”

 

Boxoffice, February 15, 1947:

Directors Plan Distribution Of 16 John Wayne Reissues

NEW ORLEANS—Joy Houck and E.V. Landaische hosted a meeting here of J. Francis White Jr., Charlotte; John W. Mangham, Atlanta, and John L. Franconi, Dallas, all officers of Great Western Pictures, Inc., to plan distribution of lately acquired rights to 16 John Wayne features originally produced by Trem Carr for Monogram.

The deal includes full U.S. and Canadian rights, both 16mm and 35mm and television possibilities.

 

Showmen's Trade Review, March 29, 1947:

Gets Wayne Reissues

John W. Mangham, president of Great Western Pictures, Inc., of Atlanta, Ga., announces the acquisition by his company of United States and Canadian rights to 16 reissues of John Wayne western pictures, both 35-mm. and 16-mm., from Monogram Pictures, with print deliveries to begin on April 1. Distribution of 16-mm. versions has been turned over to W. Wells Alexander of the Distributors Group, Inc.

 

The June 14, 1947 issue of The Billboard reported: “W. Wells Alexander, the Distributor's Group, Inc., Atlanta, states that 16mm libraries are “jumping on the bandwagon” with the John Wayne series of 16 Westerns, for which he is national sales rep. Great Western Pictures, Inc., has reissued the John Wayne series, purchased from Monogram Pictures, and is delivering prints at a two-a-month rate, Alexander says. First issues were delivered to libraries as of May 25.”

Great Western Pictures could be related to the company formed in the early 1940's by Buck Jones and Monogram executives Scott R. Dunlap and Trem Carr, a production unit at Monogram that made the Rough Rider series featuring Jones, Tim McCoy and Raymond Hatton. The company also produced the subsequent Johnny Mack Brown and Whip Wilson westerns for Monogram, referenced as Great Western Productions, Inc., but listed in the early trades as Great Western Pictures, located at 4376 Sunset Drive (the address of Monogram Pictures), and later listed as Great Western Productions, Inc. (with Scott R. Dunlap as president).

John W. Mangham, Jr., president of Great Western Pictures, Inc., was a longtime exchangeman who would eventually be branch manager of Monogram's Atlanta office in 1931, under the umbrella of Arthur C. Bromberg, head of the studio's exchanges in the Southeast. Mangham, once part of Republic's corporate Advisory Committee, would stay with the Atlanta exchange after the transition to Republic and then organize Southern Film Exchanges, Inc., which eventually would become Screen Guild Productions, Inc., co-founded with John Franconi, a franchise holder of Monogram for Texas.

Shortly after attaining the reissue rights to the Lone Star westerns, the trades announced that Mangham and Franconi would form Western Adventure Pictures Corp., a new distribution company with plans to produce westerns in San Antonio, Texas. Partnered with J. Francis White, Jr., a Screen Guild franchise holder in Charlotte, North Carolina, and southeast circuit owner Joy Houck, the company would initially make Lash LaRue westerns with veteran director Ray Taylor.

Reissue advertising of the Lone Star westerns from the late 1940's show the distributor's name as Western Adventure Pictures, Inc., the distribution arm of Western Adventure Productions, Inc.

John W. Mangham, Jr. also was manager of Film Classics of the Southeast, with John Franconi running the Texas franchise. Film Classics, Inc. was organized in 1943 by George A. Hirliman (as president) and Irvin Shapiro (as general manager), initially distributing reissues.

In 1945 the trades announced another company, United Screen Attractions, was organized with Shapiro as president, the company to distribute internationally all 35mm product controlled by International Theatrical & Television Corp., Hirliman's company which had world rights to various features and serials from the former Mascot Pictures library.

Following the Lone Star westerns being theatrically reissued by Western Adventure Pictures beginning in 1947, television was to be the next medium. In August 1949 the films began appearing on KTSL in Los Angeles, sponsored by a shoe company, handled by Toby Anguish's Television Pictures Distributing Corp. Rainbow Valley was the first to be shown.

Anguish's company, formed in 1948, had television rights to over 540 films, mostly pre-1943 westerns, many probably acquired from his close affiliation with the recently bankrupt International Theatrical & Television Corp., a company spearheaded in 1944 by George A. Hirliman and Eliot Hyman.

Theatre Owners of America, Inc., in a special bulletin published in mid-1949, stated there were 433 feature films available for television. Television Pictures Distributing Corp. was the major player at this time, reportedly with 80% of the market for both features and shorts.

 

The Billboard, January 1, 1949:

NEW YORK, Dec. 25—A deal whereby the American Broadcasting Company (ABC) would contract for 44 Hollywood-produced Western films was near signing this week. The web was ironing out final details with Telecast Films, Inc., of New York for a 52-week set-up which would service the films to ABC and its owned-and-operated stations. The web also plans to make the films available to affiliates about January 15.

The pix include 16 starring John Wayne, and others featuring Rex Bell, Ken Maynard and the Range Busters. The deal would have each feature shown once, and eight of the Wayne films used twice. Details on price have not yet been settled, but ABC is understood to be in line for a volume discount based on the favorable response from affiliates toward using the films.

 

Ultimately 15 of the Lone Star westerns ended up in the hands of Matthew “Matty” Fox, a longtime Universal executive who formed Motion Pictures for Television, Inc. in 1951, and a subsidiary, Western Television Corp. Fox is probably best known for purchasing television rights to RKO's feature film and shorts library in 1955, through his C&C Super Corp.

Matthew Fox got all right, title and interest in all but one of the Lone Star films, including copyrights and negatives. The package acquired in the 1980s by Classics Associates was comprised of the 15 Lone Star westerns and 163 other features, mostly from Producers Releasing Corp., the majority probably purchased in 1951 from Eagle-Lion (owned by Pathe Industries) by Matthew Fox and his partner, Arthur B. Krim, at a time when a management team was trying to save the privately-held, near-bankrupt United Artists.

The entire package of 178 films wound up in the hands of Joseph Harris, appointing for television distribution National Telefilm Associates (NTA), which ended up buying the library with a series of notes, in default by the time Classics Associates came along.

Classics Associates worked out a three-step back-to-back deal for the library—NTA to Harris Associates (for cancellation of the notes), Harris Associates to JED Productions Corp. (Jackson E. Dube's Liechtenstein entity, Standard Film Establishment), and JED to Classics Associates. JED held on to the foreign and remake rights, which were later purchased from the widow and children of Jack Dube.

The chain of title for the Lone Star films is unclear before Matthew Fox was involved. Based on what was reported in the trades in early 1947, Monogram still owned the copyrights.

Somewhere along the line Matthew Fox acquired the Lone Star westerns for his Western Television Corp., a holding company formed in June 1951, which distributed all its product through Motion Pictures for Television, Inc., the two companies helmed by Fox.

Western Television's library, with most of the films owned outright, was distributed beginning in early 1955 by Guild Films Co., Inc. through its MPTV Films, Inc. subsidiary. The temporary Guild deal meant that MPTV no longer existed as a sales, service and booking organization, but Matthew Fox retained financial interest and all other rights in the feature film catalog.

C&C Super Corp. purchased Western Television in 1955, becoming a division of the company but still headed by Fox, who would also head C&C Television Corp. The latter would handle the RKO library beginning in 1956, with three new subsidiaries created in 1957, notably C&C Films, Inc.

With the purchase of Western Television by C&C Super Corp., of which Fox was now a substantial stockholder with the former's sale and the sale of his entire holdings in United Artists Corp., C&C acquired Western's 600–700 features. The exact number was never officially disclosed, but was known to be the largest single collection in television.

C&C Television Corp. was renamed Television Industries, Inc. in 1958, retaining its Western Television division. Matthew Fox resigned as president and director of Television Industries in early 1961.

Martin J. Robinson, vice-president and domestic sales manager, Television Industries, Inc., and vice-president, sales, C&C Films, Inc. (domestic TV distributor of the RKO library), was owed a great deal of money from Western Television. As payment, Robinson acquired outright a library of films from Western in May 1963, which included 15 of the Lone Star westerns.

Francis B. Robinson, presumably Martin's brother, was also involved in the company—Link Industries, Inc.—which acquired the library from Western Television. The package of films was referred to in all of Films Around the World's early notes as the “Link-Harris Library.”

Martin J. Robinson, who began his television career in 1953 as account executive with MPTV Syndication Corp., became executive vice-president in charge of operations for Western Television in 1956. He joined United Artists Television as vice-president and sales manager in 1965, eventually becoming president and chief executive officer of the company in 1978.

In June 1964, Harris Associates, Inc. purchased all rights to the library that the Robinsons had acquired from Western Television, with distribution rights sold to National Telefilm Associates in February 1965. The library was sold to NTA by Harris Associates in mid-1972. This library would form the basis, with many films no longer in the original package, of what Classics Associates—now Films Around the World—would own in 1985.

Joseph Harris (1900–1983), a successful New York insurance broker, began to dabble in the film industry in the 1940's, notably Harris-Broder Pictures Corp., formed in 1947 with Harris as chairman of the board and treasurer. The company soon was renamed Realart Pictures, Inc., which established state rights exchanges nationwide and secured a ten-year term for ten years' backlog of Universal's product for reissuing, a deal negotiated with Universal executive vice-president Matthew Fox.

In March 1949, months before stepping down as Realart's board chairman and treasurer, Joseph Harris, with his son James, Sy Weintraub and David Wolper, formed Flamingo Films, Inc., with a smalll catalog of feature films and shorts.

Flamingo Films merged with Eliot Hyman's Associated Artists Productions, Ltd. in 1951 to form Motion Pictures for Television, Inc. (MPTV), with Hyman, Weintraub and James Harris as vice-presidents of the new company helmed by Matthew Fox. Joseph Harris was executive vice-president and David Wolper a regional sales manager.

 

The Billboard, February 5, 1955:

“The bulk of the MPTV feature film library was put together by merging Elliot [sic] Hyman's Associated Artists and Joe Harris' Flamingo Films. [Matthew] Fox reportedly engineered the deal by getting the Lansing Foundation to put up the money for the merger which gave both Hyman and Harris substantial capital gains on their product. The MPTV product was said to have grossed $4,000,000 for the first several years that it was on the market. Harris got the majority of his features for $4,000 a film, which was as juicy a deal ever made by a feature film syndicator.”

 

In December 1953 all four founders of Flamingo Films resigned from MPTV and briefly aligned themselves with the newly formed National Telefilm Associates before reviving Flamingo. Eliot Hyman would split with MPTV and revive AAP as Associated Artists Productions, Inc.

In 1954, Flamingo Films became a subsidiary of the newly formed Essex Universal Corp., with Joseph Harris as president, described as a millionaire-industrialist who reportedly was chief bankroller and advisor of MPTV during its inception. Harris made a failed attempt in 1957 to take over Republic Pictures, with the company ultimately sold in 1959 to a group of Los Angeles industrialists headed by Victor M. Carter.

National Telefilm Associates was taken over in 1959 by National General Corp., through its subsidiary National Theatres, Inc., at the time America's second largest theatre chain, which then became National Theatres & Television, Inc. NTA, spun off from NT&T in 1961, though still affiliated, acquired the Republic library in February 1967 from Republic Corp. for $3.35 million.

In October 1968, Joseph Harris and Norman Alexander, president of the Sun Chemical Corp., both longtime business partners, acquired two-thirds of NTA's stock from National General Corp.

The sale of the Republic library in 1967 was reported by the trades as purchased by Emery Pictures, Inc., New York, with NTA handling domestic television and theatrical rights, Emery the rest of the world.

In 1971, Tele-Communications, Inc. (TCI), in two separate deals, acquired control of NTA and the Republic film library. NTA itself was sold to TCI for $4.5 million by Joseph Harris and Norman Alexander, whose stock represented 78% of the company, the remainder owned by 9,700 public stockholders. TCI, the fifth largest cable operator at the time, acquired the Republic library for $3 million from Walter Heller Factors, a Chicago investment banking firm.

Listen to a 4-minute audio snippet from a 2013 interview by Gerry Fialka with James B. Harris, the second son of Joseph Harris, where he talks about how his father got into the film business. Although only Films, Inc. is mentioned in the interview, that company had nothing to do with Joseph Harris, who in 1946 would form Film Highlights, Inc. with longtime Films, Inc. sales executive Martin Ross. Harris' initial entry in the film business also included U.S. Film Export Corp. and Magnus Films, Inc.

Joseph Harris controlled, in part, the 47 John Wayne titles reportedly in the NTA library. As an executive with Realart Pictures from 1947–1949, Harris also indirectly controlled the six films John Wayne had made at Universal for Trem Carr, since Realart reissued those beginning in 1948 and 1949 (three were sublicensed to Film Classics). Realart also reissued three other John Wayne titles from Universal: Seven Sinners (sublicensed to Eagle-Lion), The Spoilers (sublicensed to Film Classics) and Pittsburgh, all three films initially reissued in 1947 and 1948.

Joseph Harris had corporate ties with two other John Wayne titles, both distributed by MPTV beginning in December 1951, through its Racine Television Corp.: Stagecoach and The Long Voyage Home. These and 23 other features, all from United Artists, were embroiled in over five years of litigation, with both Masterpiece Productions, Inc. and MPTV claiming television rights to the films.

Both companies were playing them on television, initially Masterpiece, whose predecessor was reportedly Magnus Films (Joseph Harris, board chairman and treasurer). The legal wranglings, caused by “fuzzy terminology” of the contract, would be settled in 1956—Masterpiece the winner.

As related in the interview with James B. Harris, Joseph Harris enjoyed watching 16mm films at home, a pastime that would see him be involved in the distribution of one-third of John Wayne's main body of work.

All the modified films from Classics Associates were initially distributed on videocassette in 1985 by Sony, which also released five titles on a DVD compilation in 2002—by then Sony had acquired Columbia—and four on LaserDisc. All were also released to television.

In the UK, Second Sight Films released them on VHS in 1998 and on region-free DVD in 2002 (shown below). They were also released in the UK by Cinema Club in 2003, the same versions but with a higher bitrate and locked to region 2. (View a 1985 advertisement from Sony stating, “Transferred to quality videotape directly from the restored original film negatives and enhanced by new soundtrack recordings in stereo.”)

In late 2012 Films Around the World's own label (Mr. FAT-W Video) began distributing 14 of the modified Monogram films, advertised as from “original 35mm nitrate negative material,” selling their DVD-Rs (shown below) through both Amazon and Movies Unlimited. The Star Packer was released in October 2013, although was not from nitrate master elements.

Ten of the 15 titles released by Mr. FAT-W Video are NTSC debuts on DVD (technically DVD-R) since five titles were released by Columbia in 2002, and those released in the UK are in PAL format (although from NTSC masters).

One must be resigned with the fact that the best prints—the “official prints”—have synthesized music and minor editing, perhaps a small price to pay for the better print quality. The new music, although used somewhat sparingly, is very much out of place in the western genre and the time frame of films made in the 1930's—purists will cringe at the thought. The print quality varies, too, a few belying their “original negative” origins, although the quality is far beyond what one is likely to find on public domain labels.

Below is a collage of screen captures from the Mr. FAT-W Video DVD-Rs, each slightly cropped for presentation but with no color-correction so that the 'tone' of the films are represented accurately. Click here for a full-size view.

Fourteen video clips are available to get a better sense of the quality: Blue Steel, The Dawn Rider, The Desert Trail, The Lawless Frontier, The Lucky Texan, The Man from Utah, 'Neath the Arizona Skies, Paradise Canyon, Randy Rides Alone, Riders of Destiny, Sagebrush Trail, Texas Terror, The Trail Beyond, and West of the Divide. The DVD-Rs, hard-telecined and encoded with more than sufficient bitrates, are not perfect by any means but are for the most part quite lovely.

 

 

It should be noted that The Lawless Frontier is an entirely different print than the Mr. FAT-W Video version, the latter of much better quality. Both have the same music but, for reasons unknown, Second Sight's version has been culled from a 16mm Ivy Films print. Second Sight's Randy Rides Alone is prefaced with a notice from the UCLA Film Archives, and has not been restored to the same standard as the Mr. FAT-W Video version.

It is odd that these and other anomalies exist for what should be standardized prints, especially when Second Sight's packaging extols using the original negatives held in the vaults of Republic Studios, which in the strictness sense is simply not true on multiple levels.

The original negatives were eventually part of National Telefilm Associates, which became Republic Pictures in 1985, so technically the negatives, stored at UCLA, were in the hands of the new Republic's predecessor, NTA. The films were still owned by Monogram Pictures in the late 1940's, but by a full corporate circle the films ended up in the library of a company that would eventually become Republic, although in 1985, when it was rechristened, rights to the negatives had been passed on to Classics Associates.

Comparison videos showing clips from the Mr. FAT-W and Second Sight versions, playing in sync, are available to view. Besides scaling and deinterlacing, no other post-processing was performed so the clips represent what is on the DVDs: Randy Rides Alone, The Lawless Frontier, The Man from Utah, The Dawn Rider, Texas Terror, The Desert Trail, Riders of Destiny, The Trail Beyond, 'Neath the Arizona Skies, West of the Divide, Sagebrush Trail, Blue Steel, The Lucky Texan, and Paradise Canyon.

The biggest oddities are Second Sight's versions of The Man from Utah and The Desert Trail, which have the original soundtrack (no new music) but credits William Barber, who composed and orchestrated all the new music for the entire series. This clearly illustrates the hodgepodge nature of Second Sight's compilation.

It is plainly obvious that Fox/Lorber Associates–Classics Associates issued different versions of the modified films, some from entirely different negatives and others from the same negatives but with further restoration. The Mr. FAT-W versions are the ones presented on the US Encore channel, which was extremely picky about quality, often sending multiple single-frame rejections. Because of this, some of the titles are shorter in duration.

Disregarding the minor exceptions mentioned, the Mr. FAT-W Video versions are superior.

To many people these differences will be moot points: the films have been bastardized with annoying, mostly synthesized music, and thus will never be part of one's John Wayne collection—a step below colorization. But if one can live with the new music, the Mr. FAT-W Video versions provide wonderful visuals with their 'studio' or near-studio quality.

 

 

Running times for the Mr. FAT-W, Second Sight and Columbia versions have been carefully compared, and their differences—excluding extraneous material—have been included in the entries below. Although the Second Sight versions are in PAL format, they are derived from NTSC masters so PAL speed-up is not a factor.

Important to note for running times is that many public domain labels have versions of the Lone Star westerns that simply play slower than normal. If your copy of the The Dawn Rider, for instance, clocks in at over 55 minutes, it is probably not a longer version with additional scenes. I have done many side-by-side comparisons with two versions of the same film initially playing in perfect sync in an MPEG editor (as shown above), only to see one very quickly lag behind the other.

The Lone Star westerns released by Mr. FAT-W, Second Sight and Columbia do not have this pronounced lag, which can exceed four per cent. Some titles on public domain compilations play slower, while others in the same compilation play at the correct speed or very close. The only true way to confirm the speed and the correct running time is to compare two versions. Some of the original theatrical running times are confusing enough without factoring in slow playback.

One thing commonly excised from the restored versions are stock footage shots. West of the Divide, for example, has 1m:13s of two cattle herding scenes cut entirely from the Mr. FAT-W and Second Sight versions, the poor quality footage simply used to pad out the running time. The Second Sight and Columbia versions are exactly the same, but Mr. FAT-W opted to cut 29 seconds out of the opening scene, rather important to the film's premise.

Riders of Destiny has at least 1m:46s removed from the Mr. FAT-W version compared to the Republic VHS. One entire scene encompassing 2m:33s in the Mr. FAT-W version is also in an entirely different juncture in the film, an oddity in these editions. View a video of the cuts, which includes quite a long scene. View another example of cuts from the Mr. FAT-W version, this time Paradise Canyon, which has 1m:10s excised, all minor except a chase scene.

Many of the cuts in the Mr. FAT-W versions are almost imperceptible, encompassing a few tenths of a second here and there but done enough times to add up. Mr. FAT-W's The Trail Beyond is 11 seconds shorter than the Second Sight and Columbia versions, with one 10-second scene cut because of the two cue marks (which are routinely removed in restorations today). This film must have been in very good condition because very little was cut compared with the Second Sight version, including those being almost imperceptible; such cuts are more prolific with most of the other Mr. FAT-W titles. The slightly longer Second Sight version does have cuts, though, which amounts to 42 seconds, notably this scene (which does drag on a bit), four stock footage horse falls, and a small portion of a waterfall scene.

Mr. FAT-W's The Dawn Rider is 24 seconds shorter than the Second Sight version, with a little more than half that time from almost imperceptible cuts. Three scenes were cut enough to present a video, which has been slowed down by 50% so one can see the film defects that probably warranted their removal.

Mr. FAT-W's Sagebrush Trail is 1m:15s shorter than the Second Sight version, five seconds of which are almost imperceptible. In one scene, FAT-W changed the narrative ever so slightly with the use of overlapping dialog in an interior scene jumping to an outdoor scene, this form of editing from the originals appearing infrequently in these editions. View the 1m:10s of overt cuts.

The Lucky Texan from Mr. FAT-W is 2m:44s shorter than the Second Sight version, with no scene cut by more than 16 seconds. The obvious cuts comprise 2m:06s, the remainder so small that they can not be presented without the use of slow motion. Obviously these tiny, almost indiscernible cuts represent 38 seconds, testimony to how much of the editor's knife was used on this film. Like all the samples here, two seconds of black video has been inserted between each scene. View the obvious cuts, which represents 31 scenes. The Second Sight version is cut by 15 seconds, immediately after the credits, with Wayne seen dismounted from his horse; the cut has Wayne approaching on horseback before dismounting.

Mr. FAT-W's The Desert Trail is 2m:52s shorter than the Second Sight version, the majority of the cuts of rodeo stock footage. Note the scene were John Wayne speaks on horseback but his voice can not be heard, and later the audio dropout while firing his gun by a window—both probably cut because of the audio. These audio glitches, however, do not appear in the high quality print released on Nuray Pictures' DVD-R, which was culled from the vaults of Video Yesteryear, one of the pioneers of the public domain field. These two scenes are presented here.

The Second Sight and Mr. FAT-W versions of Randy Rides Alone are very similar except for one scene where Second Sight's has been edited differently, something that words can not explain like a dual video clip. The audioless clip begins in perfect unison and soon will play tricks on the eyes. It should be viewed at least twice, the Second Sight version six seconds longer to the point where it rejoins the continuity of the Mr. FAT-W version as Alberta Vaughn exits the door. FAT-W changed the scene to work around the damaged film. View other cuts, all quite minor.

Because a few of the Mr. FAT-W versions are longer than those of Second Sight, other prints must be used as a benchmark for cuts. In the case of Texas Terror, the Mill Creek Entertainment and Internet Archive versions were used for comparison. Both are rather nice prints, which as far as I can tell are not second-generation masters from videocassette, so common in the public domain. The prints play at the proper speed too. Noticeable cuts compared to the FAT-W version amounts to 40 seconds, as presented in the video clip (which includes an important scene where Wayne hands in his badge). With the finite FAT-W cuts, whose cumulative result is a shorter film without altering any scene very much, the running time is about 51m:38s.

Mr. FAT-W's The Man from Utah is longer than the Second Sight version, but the former has about 17 seconds of noticeable cuts. FAT-W's version is longer only because the Second Sight version has a 36-second stock footage rodeo scene cut. Considering all this, the running time of the film as it exists today is 52m:01s.

The Second Sight version of The Lawless Frontier was culled from a 16mm Ivy Films print, while Mr. FAT-W's is of better quality. For comparison I used the Alpha Video release because it is more complete. Ironically a few small scenes are cut slightly in the Alpha release, but otherwise provides a good benchmark for comparison. Alpha's was probably culled from a VHS since masking covers the bottom of what was most likely head-switching noise from a VCR. Mr. FAT-W has edited the film by 2m:26s, making the running time at least 51m:21s if the cuts were included in the Mr. FAT-W version.

'Neath the Arizona Skies is another one of those films that Mr. FAT-W has edited with a fine knife without altering anything enough to change the continuity, except for excluding a 1m:27s scene. The other 1m:32s comprise many, many finite cuts and those which could be presented in short clips, which I have opted not to do, including a seven-second horse chase scene. The Mr. FAT-W version, however, leaves the film's 14-second opening scene—stock footage of an Indian village—intact, while Second Sight excludes it.

Like 'Neath the Arizona Skies, except for the cut scene as shown above, Mr. FAT-W's Blue Steel has small cuts enough to reduce its running time by 19 seconds without changing the film's flow. One scene had a slight continuity change that only a dual video clip can describe.

The Star Packer is FAT-W's most heavily cut film, with 3m:48s left on the cutting room floor. The biggest cut of any scene is a continuous closeup of Verna Hillie as she lies in bed, originally 26 seconds long but cut to five seconds. A dark tunnel scene is next, with two sequences cut by almost 19 seconds, followed in duration by 18 continuous seconds in a chase scene (of which other parts are cut). Many more cuts exist, of course, but most importantly only one dialog scene hit FAT-W's floor. Oddly, a seven-second scene with Verna Hillie is cut from the Second Sight version but appears in the Mr. FAT-W version. The running time on public domain labels, which include the scene in question, runs around 54m:35s, but this is actually 53m:18s without the slower playback.

The original negatives of the Lone Star westerns have been stored at UCLA since 1977, previously held at Fort Lee, New Jersey, and before that—in the early 1960's—at DeLuxe, New York. Missing are the nitrate materials for The Star Packer and Rainbow Valley. The elements have been through a lot, from their initial theatrical releases and many reissues, and then television beginning in 1949.

To master the new editions, Classics Associates ended up with 16mm negatives plus about 800 16mm television release prints, which were shipped to New York by National Telefilm Associates. Although Sony and Second Sight, and others, have stated that the films were restored from the original film negatives, this is unlikely according to Alex Kogan of Films Around the World. He states: “In addition to surviving nitrate materials in our name at UCLA, we have 16mm reduction negatives, which were made from the 35mm nitrate negatives when NTA was distributing them to the various Malone TV/cable stations, for the production of the 16mm release prints.”

Television was especially hard on prints, with 16mm printdowns being made to service the many stations showing the films. These 16mm versions, besides being played over and over again, were often abused and damaged by stations, requiring more prints to be made from 35mm. John Wayne's popularity is responsible, in part, for the condition of the elements.

A number of the titles are shorter today than what appeared in trade journal reviews, some of which may not have been accurate to begin with. Was the running time of The Lawless Frontier, for example, really 59 minutes as reviewed in The Film Daily, or 54 minutes as reviewed in Motion Picture Herald; or 52 minutes as reviewed in Variety?

Perhaps some of the Lone Star titles were re-edited for television, much like Republic did in the early 1950's when many of their westerns were edited down to 53 minutes and the music rescored. Since the Lone Stars did not have musical scores, except at the start and end, editing the films would have been much easier.

Missing from the restored versions is Rainbow Valley. Trade journals all seemed to agree on the film's running time of 52 minutes, yet the awful prints—or print since the same one seems to be used by everyone—in circulation today are cut by three minutes. The best release that I have seen is from the vaults of Video Yesteryear, released on DVD-R by Nuart Pictures, with telltale signs it was culled from a videocassette master. Video Yesteryear's version is from a relatively clean print and runs 49m:10s. View a clip; view a 1997 advert from Video Yesteryear. (A few of the Video Yesteryear versions, released by Nuart Pictures on DVD-R, have new credits.)

Comparing slowed-down versions on public domain labels, many of whose titles have propagated to the internet, makes it seem that the restored versions are shorter than they are in reality. There are cuts, some more than others, but not as much as the many slowed-down versions on public domain labels would have one believe.

 

 

Fourteen of the Lone Star westerns were colorized and copyrighted in 1990 by Color Systems Technology, Inc. (CST), with new music and sound effects, and released on videocassette by United American Video Corp. (UAV Entertainment) and VidAmerica, Inc. Most of these full-length versions were then condensed to 22½ minutes each and retitled, marketed on television and videocassette under The Young Duke Series banner by CST Featurizations, Inc. and Nelvana Tech, Inc.

The feature versions, unlike like those condensed, have entirely new soundtracks with every character's voice dubbed. View a sample from West of the Divide, first showing the CST version which is followed by the original. The voice of George Hayes seems original, but it is dubbed like all the others in these versions.

The 12 condensed Lone Star versions have made their way to DVD, some released domestically by Sterling Entertainment Group, the successor to UAV. One of the 13 condensed versions—all of which were released internationally on DVD—is actually a Republic title, Winds of the Wasteland (retitled The Stagecoach Race). Two of the Lone Stars were never released in colorized featurette form: Riders of Destiny and 'Neath the Arizona Skies. The two never colorized by CST, or by the three other companies doing colorizations at this time, are Rainbow Valley and Texas Terror.

The CST/Nelvana Lone Star titles: Fugitive (Sagebrush Trail), Claim Jumpers (The Lucky Texan), Cowboy G-Man (Paradise Canyon), Next of Kin (West of the Divide), Bandits of the Badlands (Blue Steel), Rodeo Racketeers (The Man from Utah), The Drifter (Randy Rides Alone), The Shadow Gang (The Star Packer), Klondike Gold (The Trail Beyond), Vengeance Is Mine (The Lawless Frontier), On the Run (The Desert Trail), and Avenging Angel (The Dawn Rider).

The abridged versions are currently owned and distributed by Nelvana Limited, while ownership to the feature versions are held by Multicom Entertainment Group, Inc. The feature versions, which retain their original titles, were released on region-free DVD in 2015 by Questar, Inc.

In 2006 and 2007, Legend Films released six all-new full-length colorized versions on DVD, including one from Republic: An Innocent Man (Sagebrush Trail), Cold Vengeance (The Dawn Rider), Gold Strike River (The Lucky Texan), Guns Along the Trail (Paradise Canyon), Stolen Goods (Blue Steel) and Stagecoach Run (Winds of the Wasteland). Also included are the black and white versions which share the same changes. Except for the new music, sound effects and credits, the Legend versions are true to the original films.

Besides FAT-W, Legend and CST, another company added new music to the Lone Star westerns. Burbank Video (aka Viking Entertainment, Inc.) modified four of the titles in 1989, which were released on videocassette: Texas Terror, 'Neath the Arizona Skies, The Lucky Texan, and The Dawn Rider. These versions, however, do not appear to be in circulation these days. Those from Video Yesteryear, released on DVD-R by Nuray Pictures, have new credits for some of their titles but with no new music between the start and end credits.

 

     
     

Paradise Canyon

Monogram (1935)
Public Domain (various labels)

John Wayne (John Wyatt), Marion Burns, Reed Howes, Earle Hodgins, Gino Corrado. Directed by Carl L. Pierson. b&w; 53 mins. ©1935 [never registered]. Produced by Lone Star Productions. TJWF: 59 mins.; AFI: 52-53 or 59 mins.; BBFC: 53m:20s; BFI: 4,819' [53m:32s]. Released on DVD-R by Mr. FAT-W Video (UPC 886470678938; 52m:00s). The FAT-W version is 0m:11s longer than the Second Sight version; 0m:16s shorter than the Columbia version (52m:16s). The FAT-W version is cut by at least 1m:10s (53m:10s).

 
 

The Dawn Rider

Monogram (1935)
Public Domain (various labels)

John Wayne (John Mason), Marion Burns, Denny Meadows, Reed Howes, Joe DeGrasse. Directed by R.[obert] N. Bradbury. b&w; 53 mins. ©1935 [never registered]. Produced by Lone Star Productions. TJWF: 56 mins.; AFI: 53 or 56 mins./4,864' [54m:02s]; BBFC: 53m:20s; BFI: 4,771' [53m:00s]; 1936 Kinematograph Year Book: 4,800' [53m:20s]. Released on DVD-R by Mr. FAT-W Video (UPC 886470678563; 52m:50s). The FAT-W version is 0m:24s shorter than the Second Sight version (53m:14s).

 
 

The Desert Trail

Monogram (1935)
Public Domain (various labels)

John Wayne (John Scott), Mary Kornman, Paul Fix, Eddy Chandler, Carmen LaRoux. Directed by Cullen Lewis (Lewis D. Collins). b&w; 55 mins. ©1935 [never registered]. Produced by Lone Star Productions. TJWF: 54 mins.; BBFC: 54m:27s; BFI: 4,952' [55m:01s]; 1936 Kinematograph Year Book: 4,934' [54m:49s]. Released on DVD-R by Mr. FAT-W Video (UPC 886470678525; 51m:55s). The FAT-W version is 2m:52s shorter than the Second Sight version (54m:47s); 0m:20s shorter than the Columbia version.

 
 

Rainbow Valley

Monogram (1935)
Public Domain (various labels)

John Wayne (John Martin), Lucille Browne, George Hayes, LeRoy Mason, Lloyd Ingraham. Directed by R.[obert] N. Bradbury. b&w; 52 mins. ©1934 [never registered]. Produced by Lone Star Productions. Filmed before Texas Terror. BBFC: 52m:04s; BFI: 4,459' [49m:32s].

 
 

Texas Terror

Monogram (1935)
Public Domain (various labels)

John Wayne (Sheriff John Higgins), Lucille Browne, LeRoy Mason, Fern Emmett, George Hayes. Directed by R.[obert] N. Bradbury. b&w; 52 mins. ©1934 Monogram Pictures Corp. Produced by Lone Star Productions. TJWF: 51-58 mins.; AFI: 45 or 51 mins.; BBFC: 52m:34s; 1936 Kinematograph Year Book: 4,467' [49m:38s] and 4,667' [51m:51s]; 1953 Kinematograph Year Book: 4,872' [54m:08s]. Released on DVD-R by Mr. FAT-W Video (UPC 886470678921; 50m:42s). The FAT-W version is 0m:45s longer than the Second Sight version. The FAT-W version is cut by at least 0m:56s (51m:38s).

 
 

'Neath the Arizona Skies    UK: 'Neath Arizona Skies

Monogram (1934)
Public Domain (various labels)

John Wayne (Chris Morrell), Sheila Terry, Shirley Jane Rickert, Jack Rockwell, Yakima Canutt. Directed by Harry Fraser. b&w; 52 mins. ©1934 Monogram Pictures Corp. Produced by Lone Star Productions. TJWF: 52-57 mins.; AFI: 52, 54 or 56-57 mins.; BBFC: 52m:13s. Often reviewed and advertised as 'Neath Arizona Skies, it is unlikely the film ever appeared with that title in the credits (including the UK). Released on DVD-R by Mr. FAT-W Video (UPC 886470678761; 49m:02s). The FAT-W version is 2m:59s shorter than the Second Sight version (52m:01s). The Second Sight version is cut by 0m:14s (52m:15s).

 
 

The Lawless Frontier

Monogram (1934)
Public Domain (various labels)

John Wayne (John Tobin), Sheila Terry, Jack Rockwell, George Hayes, Buffalo Bill, Jr. (Jay Wilsey). Directed by R.[obert] N. Bradbury. b&w; 51 mins. ©1934 Monogram Pictures Corp. Produced by Lone Star Productions. TJWF: 59 mins.; AFI: 55-59 mins.; BBFC: 52m:05s; 1936 Kinematograph Year Book: 4,627' [51m:24s]. Released on DVD-R by Mr. FAT-W Video (UPC 886470678648; 48m:55s). The FAT-W version is 1m:54s longer than the Second Sight version. The FAT-W version is cut by at least 2m:26s (51m:21s).

 
 

The Trail Beyond

Monogram (1934)
Public Domain (various labels)

John Wayne (Rod Drew), Verna Hillie, Noah Beery, Sr., Noah Beery, Jr., Robert Frazer. Directed by Robert Bradbury. b&w; 55 mins. ©1934 Monogram Pictures Corp. Produced by Lone Star Productions. TJWF: 55 mins.; BBFC: 54m:59s; BFI: 5,017' [55m:44s]. Released on DVD-R by Mr. FAT-W Video (UPC 886470678792; 54m:03s). The FAT-W version is 0m:11s shorter than the Second Sight and Columbia versions (54m:14s). The Second Sight and Columbia versions are cut by 0m:42s (54m:56s).

 
 

The Star Packer    UK: He Wore a Star

Monogram (1934)
Public Domain (various labels)

John Wayne (U.S. Marshal John Travers), Verna Hillie, George Hayes, Yakima Canutt, Billy Franey. Directed by R.[obert] N. Bradbury. b&w; 53 mins. ©1934 Monogram Pictures Corp. Produced by Lone Star Productions. TJWF: 52-54 mins.; AFI: 52 or 54 mins.; BBFC: 53m:20s. Released on DVD-R by Mr. FAT-W Video (UPC 887936659454; 49m:23s). The FAT-W version is 3m:48s shorter than the Second Sight version (53m:11s). The Second Sight version is cut by 0m:07s (53m:18s).

 
 

Randy Rides Alone

Monogram (1934)
Public Domain (various labels)

John Wayne (Randy Bowers), Alberta Vaughn, George Hayes, Yakima Canutt, Earl Dwire. Directed by Harry Fraser. b&w; 52 mins. ©1934 Monogram Pictures Corp. Produced by Lone Star Productions. TJWF: 54 mins.; AFI: 54 or 56 mins.; BBFC: 52m:31s; BFI: 4,788' [53m:12s]. Released on DVD-R by Mr. FAT-W Video (UPC 886470678723; 51m:56s). The FAT-W version is 0m:24s shorter than the Second Sight version (52m:20s).

 
 

The Man from Utah

Monogram (1934)
Public Domain (various labels)

John Wayne (John Weston), Polly Ann Young, Anita Compillo, Edward Peil, George Hayes. Directed by Robert Bradbury. b&w; 52 mins. ©1934 Monogram Pictures Corp. Produced by Lone Star Productions. TJWF: 55-57 mins.; AFI: 55 or 57 mins.; BBFC: 52m:11s; 1935 Kinematograph Year Book: 4,696' [52m:10s]. Released on DVD-R by Mr. FAT-W Video (UPC 886470678662; 51m:44s). The FAT-W version is 0m:19s longer than the Second Sight version. The Mr. FAT-W version is cut by at least 0m:17s (52m:01s).

 
 

Blue Steel

Monogram (1934)
Public Domain (various labels)

John Wayne (Marshal John Carruthers), Eleanor Hunt, George Hayes, Edward Peil, Yakima Canutt. Directed by Robert Bradbury. b&w; 54 mins. ©1934 Monogram Pictures Corp. Produced by Lone Star Productions. TJWF: 54-59 mins.; AFI: 54 or 59 mins.; BBFC: 54m:13s. Released on DVD-R by Mr. FAT-W Video (UPC 886470678600; 53m:44s). The FAT-W version is 0m:19s shorter than the Second Sight version (54m:03s). The Second Sight version is cut by 0m:07s (54m:10s).

 
 

West of the Divide

Monogram (1934)
Public Domain (various labels)

John Wayne (Ted Hayden), Virginia Faire Brown (Virginia Brown Faire), George Hayes, Loyd (Lloyd) Whitlock, Yakima Canutt. Directed by Robert N. Bradbury. b&w; 53 mins. ©1933 Monogram Pictures Corp. Produced by Lone Star Productions. Filmed before The Lucky Texan. TJWF: 52-55 mins.; AFI: 52 or 54-55 mins.; BBFC: 53m:19s. Released on DVD-R by Mr. FAT-W Video (UPC 886470678822; 51m:32s). The FAT-W version is 0m:29s shorter than the Second Sight and Columbia versions (52m:01s). The Second Sight and Columbia versions are cut by at least 1m:13s (53m:14s).

 
 

The Lucky Texan

Monogram (1934)
Public Domain (various labels)

John Wayne (Jerry Mason), Barbara Sheldon, Lloyd Whitlock, George Hayes, Yakima Canutt. Directed by Robert N. Bradbury. b&w; 54 mins. ©1933 Monogram Pictures Corp. Produced by Lone Star Productions. TJWF: 56 mins.; BBFC: 54m:47s; BFI: 4,900' [54m:26s]. Released on DVD-R by Mr. FAT-W Video (UPC 886470678778; 51m:26s). The FAT-W version is 2m:44s shorter than the Second Sight version (54m:10s). The Second Sight version is cut by 0m:15s (54m:25s).

 
 

Sagebrush Trail

Monogram (1933)
Public Domain (various labels)

John Wayne (John Brant), Nancy Shubert, Lane Chandler, Yakima Canutt, Henry Hall. Directed by Armand Schaefer. b&w; 54 mins. ©1933 Monogram Pictures Corp. Produced by Lone Star Productions. TJWF: 55-58 mins.; AFI: 53, 55 or 58-59 mins./4,839' [53m:46s]; BBFC: 53m:45s; BFI: 4,881' [54m:14s]. Released on DVD-R by Mr. FAT-W Video (UPC 886470678853; 52m:23s). The FAT-W version is 1m:15s shorter than the Second Sight version (53m:38s).

 
 

College Coach    UK: Football Coach

Warner Bros. (1933)
Warner Bros. 27691 [made-to-order DVD-R] (keep case; Region 0)

Dick Powell, Ann Dvorak, Pat O'Brien, Arthur Byron, Lyle Talbot, [John Wayne uncredited]. Directed by William A. Wellman. b&w; 76 mins. ©1933 Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. Co-presented by The Vitaphone Corp. MPPDA #2614R. AFI: 75 mins.; BBFC: 76m:40s.; Film Daily: 75 mins.; Variety: 75 mins. DVD-R release: 10-5-10 (2.0 mono; 75m:41s).

 
 

Sweetheart of Sigma Chi    UK: Girl of My Dreams

Monogram (1933)
Not available on DVD

Mary Carlisle, Buster Crabbe, Charles Starrett, Florence Lake, Ted Fio-Rito and his Orchestra. Directed by Edwin L. Marin. b&w; 76 mins. ©1933 Monogram Pictures Corp. Filmed the same time as Riders of Destiny, the reason Wayne does not actually appear in this film [see top of notes]. TJWF: 73-76 mins.; AFI: 73 or 75-76 mins.; BBFC: 73m:20s; Film Daily: 77 mins.; Variety: 73 mins.; Motion Picture Herald: 76 mins.

 
 
 

Riders of Destiny

Monogram (1933)
Public Domain (various labels)

John Wayne (Singin' Sandy Saunders), Cecilia Parker, Forrest Taylor, George Hayes, Al St. John. Directed by Robert N. Bradbury. b&w; 52 mins. ©1933 Monogram Pictures Corp. Produced by Lone Star Productions. TJWF: 58 mins.; AFI: 56, 58 or 60 mins./4,754' [52m:49s]; BBFC: 52m:49s; BFI: 4,872' [54m:08s]. Released on DVD-R by Mr. FAT-W Video (UPC 886470678945; 50m:34s). The FAT-W version is 1m:34s longer than the Second Sight and Columbia versions. The FAT-W version is cut by at least 1m:46s (52m:20s).

 
 

Baby Face

Warner Bros. (1933)
Warner Bros. 67964 (2-disc Digipak with slipcase; Region 1/2/3/4)

Barbara Stanwyck, George Brent, Donald Cook, Alphonse Ethier, Henry Kolker, [John Wayne (Jimmy McCoy, Jr.) 8th-billed]. Directed by Alfred E. Green. b&w; 71 mins. ©1933 Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. Co-presented by The Vitaphone Corp. Filmed before The Man from Monterey, His Private Secretary and The Three Musketeers [see top of notes]. AFI: 71 or 76 mins.; Film Daily: 76 mins.; Variety: 71 mins. Besides the two versions of Baby Face, Forbidden Hollywood Collection Volume 1 also includes Red-Headed Woman and Waterloo Bridge. DVD release: 12-5-06 (1.0 mono; 70m:30s [original theatrical release]; 75m:49s [pre-release version]).

 
 

The Man from Monterey

Vitagraph [Warner Bros.] (1933)
Warner Bros. 67839 (keep case; Region 1/2/3/4)

John Wayne (Capt. John Holmes), Duke (a horse), Ruth Hall, Luis Alberni, Donald Reed. Directed by Mack V. Wright. b&w; 57 mins. ©1933 Vitagraph, Inc. A “Four Star Western” (Leon Schlesinger). MPPDA #2660R. Filmed before His Private Secretary and The Three Musketeers [see top of notes]. AFI: 56-57 or 59 mins./5,294' [58m:49s]; Film Daily: 59 mins.; Variety: 56 mins.; copyrighted: 57 mins. DVD release: 11-7-06 (2.0 mono; 57m:08s); 5-22-07: released solo (cover shown on hover).

 
 

His Private Secretary

Showmens Pictures (1933)
Public Domain (various labels)

Evalyn Knapp, John Wayne (Dick Wallace), Reginald Barlow, Alec B. Francis, Arthur Hoyt. Directed by Philip H. Whitman. b&w; 60 mins. ©1933 Screencraft Productions. TJWF: 60 mins.; AFI: 60-61 or 68 mins./5,755' [63m:56s]; Film Daily: 60 mins.; Motion Picture Herald: 60 mins.; Variety: 68 mins.; copyrighted: 6 reels. The Roan Group cover shown (60m:14s). View the original and reissue title cards and a trade advertisement. (See notes.)

 
 

The Life of Jimmy Dolan    UK: The Kid's Last Fight

Warner Bros. (1933)
Not available on DVD

Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Loretta Young, Aline MacMahon, Guy Kibbee, Lyle Talbot, [John Wayne (Smith) 10th-billed]. Directed by Archie Mayo. b&w; 88 mins. ©1933 Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. Co-presented by The Vitaphone Corp. MPPDA #2607R. Filmed before Central Airport and The Three Musketeers [see top of notes]. TJWF: 89 mins.; AFI: 70-71 mins. (one-week New York engagement; later updated in the catalog to 85 mins. [general release]); Film Daily: 85 mins.; Variety: 71 mins.; Motion Picture Herald: 70 mins. TCM print: 88m:04s (uncut version).

 
 
 

Somewhere in Sonora

Vitagraph [Warner Bros.] (1933)
Warner Bros. 67839 (keep case; Region 1/2/3/4)

John Wayne (John Bishop), Duke (a horse), Henry B. Walthall, Shirley Palmer, Ann Faye. Directed by Mack V. Wright. b&w; 58 mins. ©1933 Vitagraph, Inc. A “Four Star Western” (Leon Schlesinger). MPPDA #2609R. Filmed before Central Airport and The Three Musketeers [see top of notes]. TJWF and copyrighted: 57 mins.; AFI: 57 or 59 mins./5,318' [59m:05s]; BBFC: 58m:15s; Film Daily: 59 mins.; Variety: 57 mins. DVD release: 11-7-06 (2.0 mono; 57m:29s); 5-22-07: released solo (cover shown on hover).

 
 

Central Airport

First National [Warner Bros.] (1933)
Warner Bros. 23239 [made-to-order DVD-R] (keep case; Region 0)

Richard Barthelmess, Sally Eilers, Tom Brown, Grant Mitchell, James Murray, [John Wayne uncredited]. Directed by William A. Wellman. b&w; 72 mins. ©1933 First National Pictures, Inc. Co-presented by The Vitaphone Corp. Filmed before The Three Musketeers [see top of notes]. TJWF: 70-75 mins.; AFI: 70, 72 or 75 mins.; BBFC: 74m:39s; Film Daily: 70 mins.; Variety: 72 mins.; Motion Picture Herald: 75 mins.; copyrighted: 8 reels. DVD-R release: 2-2-10 (2.0 mono; 72m:02s).

 
 

The Three Musketeers

Mascot (1933)
Public Domain (various labels)

Jack Mulhall, Raymond Hatton, Francis X. Bushman, Jr., John Wayne (Tom Wayne), Ruth Hall. Directed by Armand Schaeffer (Schaefer) and Colbert Clark. b&w; 12-chapter serial; 212 mins. ©1933 Mascot Pictures Corp. A 72-minute feature, with Wayne top-billed, was culled from this serial and released in 1949 as Desert Command (see entry). Chapter titles: (1) The Fiery Circle (2) One for All and All for One! (3) The Master Spy (4) Pirates of the Desert (5) Rebel Rifles (6) Death's Marathon (7) Naked Steel (8) The Master Strikes (9) The Fatal Cave (10) Trapped (11) The Measure of a Man (12) The Glory of Comrades.

 
 

The Telegraph Trail

Vitagraph [Warner Bros.] (1933)
Warner Bros. 67839 (keep case; Region 1/2/3/4)

John Wayne (John Trent), Duke (a horse), Frank McHugh, Marceline Day, Otis Harlan. Directed by Tenny Wright. b&w; 54 mins. ©1932 Vitagraph, Inc. A “Four Star Western” (Leon Schlesinger). MPPDA #2587R. Filmed before Haunted Gold [see top of notes]. TJWF and copyrighted: 59 mins.; AFI: 54 or 59-60 mins./5,090' [56m:33s]; BBFC: 54m:57s; Film Daily: 60 mins.; Variety: 54 mins. DVD release: 11-7-06 (2.0 mono; 53m:55s); 5-22-07: released solo (cover shown on hover).

 
 

Haunted Gold

Vitagraph [Warner Bros.] (1932)
Warner Bros. 67838 (keep case; Region 1/2/3/4)

John Wayne (John Mason), Duke (a horse), Sheila Terry, Harry Woods, Erville Alderson. Directed by Mack V. Wright. b&w; 58 mins. ©1932 Vitagraph, Inc. A “Four Star Western” (Leon Schlesinger). MPPDA #2633R. TJWF: 56-58 mins.; AFI: 57-58 mins.; copyrighted: 58 mins.; BBFC: 58m:31s.; Film Daily: 58 mins.; Variety: 57 mins. DVD release: 11-7-06 (2.0 mono; 57m:28s); 5-22-07: released solo (cover shown on hover).

 
 

That's My Boy

Columbia (1932)
Not available

Richard Cromwell, Dorothy Jordan, Mae Marsh, Arthur Stone, Douglas Dumbrille, [John Wayne uncredited]. Directed by Roy William Neill. b&w; 71 mins. ©1932 Columbia Pictures Corp. TJWF: 71 mins.; AFI: 71 mins./6,488' [72m:05s].

 
 
 

The Big Stampede

Vitagraph [Warner Bros.] (1932)
Warner Bros. 67838 (keep case; Region 1/2/3/4)

John Wayne (Deputy Sheriff John Steele), Duke (a horse), Noah Beery, Paul Hurst, Mae Madison. Directed by Tenny Wright. b&w; 53 mins. ©1932 Vitagraph, Inc. A “Four Star Western” (Leon Schlesinger). MPPDA #2608R. Filmed before The Hurricane Express [see top of notes]. TJWF: 63 mins.; AFI: 54-55 or 63 mins.; copyrighted: 54 mins.; BBFC: 55m:01s.; Film Daily: 63 mins.; Motion Picture Herald: 54 mins.; 1933 Kinematograph Year Book: 4,890' [54m:20s]. DVD release: 11-7-06 (2.0 mono; 53m:21s); 5-22-07: released solo (cover shown on hover).

 
 

Ride Him, Cowboy    UK: The Hawk

Vitagraph [Warner Bros.] (1932)
Warner Bros. 67838 (keep case; Region 1/2/3/4)

John Wayne (John Drury), Duke (a horse), Ruth Hall, Henry B. Walthall, Otis Harlan. Directed by Fred Allen. b&w; 55 mins. ©1932 Vitagraph, Inc. A “Four Star Western” (Leon Schlesinger). MPPDA #2634R. Filmed before The Hurricane Express [see top of notes]. TJWF: 56-63 mins.; AFI: 55-56 or 61 mins.; Film Daily: 61 mins.; Variety: 55 mins.; 1933 Kinematograph Year Book: 5,078' [56m:25s]. DVD release: 11-7-06 (2.0 mono; 55m:17s); 5-22-07: released solo (cover shown on hover).

 
 

The Hurricane Express

Mascot (1932)
Public Domain (various labels)

Tully Marshall, Conway Tearle, John Wayne (Larry Baker), Shirley Gray (Grey), Edmund Breese. Directed by Armand Schaefer and J. P. McGowan. b&w; 12-chapter serial; 226 mins. ©1932 Mascot Pictures Corp. [never registered]. Chapter titles: (1) The Wrecker (2) Flying Pirates (3) The Masked Menace (4) Buried Alive (5) Danger Lights (6) The Airport Mystery (7) Sealed Lips (8) Outside the Law (9) The Invisible Army (10) The Wrecker's Secret (11) Wings of Death (12) Unmasked. (See notes for the feature version.)

 
 

Lady and Gent

Paramount (1932)
Not available on DVD

George Bancroft, Wynne Gibson, Charles Starrett, James Gleason, John Wayne (Buzz Kinney). Directed by Stephen Roberts. b&w; 84 mins. ©1932 Paramount Publix Corp. TJWF: 85 mins.; AFI: 80 or 84 mins.; Variety: 84 mins.; Motion Picture Herald: 80 mins.; 1932 Kinematograph Year Book: 7,104' [78m:56s]; copyrighted 9 reels. Print in circulation is 85m:37s (probably plays slower).

 
 
 

Two-Fisted Law

Columbia (1932)
Columbia [Sony] 05823 (2 keep cases with slipcase; 6-movie compilation)

Tim McCoy, Alice Day, Wheeler Oakman, Tully Marshall, Wallace MacDonald, John Wayne (Duke). Directed by D. Ross Lederman. b&w; 57 mins. ©1932 Columbia Pictures Corp. TJWF: 64 mins.; AFI: 54 or 64 mins.; 1932 Kinematograph Year Book: 5,299' [58m:52s]; Variety: 54 mins.; copyrighted: 6 reels. The two compilations, titled Riding the Trail (click) and Riding the Range (hover), also includes five John Wayne Monogram titles: Riders of Destiny, West of the Divide, The Desert Trail, Paradise Canyon and The Trail Beyond (all from Fox/Lorber–Classics Associates with new music). DVD release: 5-14-02 (2.0 mono; 56m:39s); 9-30-14: Mill Creek from a newly mastered print, officially licensed from Sony (2.0 mono; 56m:39s; see The Range Feud for cover). (See notes.)

 
 

The Shadow of the Eagle

Mascot (1932)
Public Domain (various labels)

John Wayne (Craig McCoy), Dorothy Gulliver, Edward Hearn, Richard Tucker, Lloyd Whitlock. Directed by Ford Beebe. b&w; 12-chapter serial; 219 mins. ©1932 Mascot Pictures Corp. [never registered]. Chapter titles: (1) The Carnival Mystery (2) Pinholes (3) The Eagle Strikes (4) The Man of a Million Voices (5) The Telephone Cipher (6) The Code of the Carnival (7) Eagle or Vulture? (8) On the Spot (9) When Thieves Fall Out (10) The Man Who Knew (11) The Eagle's Wings (12) The Shadow Unmasked.

 
 

Texas Cyclone

Columbia (1932)
Columbia [Sony] 05043 (keep case; Region 1/2/3/4)

Tim McCoy, Shirley Grey, Wheeler Oakman, John Wayne (Steve Pickett), Wallace MacDonald. Directed by D. Ross Lederman. b&w; 57 mins. ©1932 Columbia Pictures Corp. TJWF and AFI: 63 mins.; 1932 Kinematograph Year Book: 5,256' [58m:24s]; Film Daily: 63 mins.; copyrighted: 6 reels. DVD release: 5-31-05 (2.0 mono; 57m:15s); 9-30-14: Mill Creek from a newly mastered print, officially licensed from Sony (2.0 mono; 57m:15s; see The Range Feud for cover). (See notes.)

 
 

Maker of Men

Columbia (1931)
Not available on DVD

Jack Holt, Richard Cromwell, Joan Marsh, John Wayne (Dusty Rhodes), Natalie Moorhead. Directed by Edward Sedgwick. b&w; 69 mins. ©1931 Columbia Pictures Corp. TJWF: 67-71 mins.; AFI: 67 mins./6,306' [70m:04s]; Film Daily: 71 mins.; Motion Picture Herald: 67 mins.; Variety: 70 mins.; 1932 Kinematograph Year Book: 6,708' [74m:32s]. Released on VHS (cover shown) by Columbia (68m:41s). View the 1998 VHS.

 
 

The Deceiver

Columbia (1931)
Not available

Lloyd Hughes, Dorothy Sebastian, Ian Keith, Natalie Moorhead, Richard Tucker, [John Wayne uncredited]. Directed by Louis King. b&w; 68 mins. ©1931 Columbia Pictures Corp. TJWF and AFI: 66-68 mins.; 1932 Kinematograph Year Book: 6,152' [68m:21s]; Film Daily: 67 mins.; Motion Picture Herald: 68 mins.; Variety: 66 mins.

 
 
 

The Range Feud  (Range Fued [sic])

Columbia (1931)
Mill Creek Entertainment 53682 (2-disc keep case; 4-movie compilation)

Buck Jones, John Wayne (Clint Turner), Susan Fleming, Ed LeSaint, William Walling. Directed by D. Ross Lederman. b&w; 58 mins. ©1931 Columbia Pictures Corp. TJWF: 64 mins.; AFI: 56, 58 or 64 mins.; BBFC: 58m:37s; Motion Picture Herald: 56 mins.; Variety: 58 mins.; Film Daily: 64 mins.; copyrighted: 6 reels. Also includes Texas Cyclone and Two-Fisted Law, the three films officially licensed from Sony Pictures; the 4th film is Angel and the Badman. DVD release: 9-30-14 (2.0 mono; 57m:28s). (See notes.)

 
 

Arizona    UK: The Virtuous Wife

Columbia (1931)
Columbia [Sony] 371865 (5-disc custom case with slipcase)

Laura La Plante, John Wayne (Lt. Bob Denton), June Clyde, Forrest Stanley, Nena Quartaro. Directed by George B. Seitz. b&w; 67 mins. ©1931 Columbia Pictures Corp. TJWF: 67-71 mins.; AFI: 67 or 70-71 mins./5,467' [60m:44s]; BBFC: 67m:57s; Film Daily: 70 mins.; Variety: 71 mins. Originally released and advertised as Arizona, the film was briefly retitled Men Are Like That for its New York opening and subsequent nationwide release, then shortly thereafter under its original title. DVD release: 7-2-12 in the 5-movie Columbia Pictures Pre-Code Collection, part of the TCM Vault Collection (2.0 mono; 66m:31s).

 
 
 

Women of All Nations

Fox Film Corp. (1931)
Not available on DVD

Victor McLaglen, Edmund Lowe, Greta Nissen, El Brendel, Fifi D'Orsay, [John Wayne uncredited]. Directed by Raoul Walsh. b&w; 72 mins. ©1931 Fox Film Corp. AFI: 71-72 mins./6,441' [71m:34s]; copyrighted: 6,441'.

 

 
 
 

Three Girls Lost

Fox Film Corp. (1931)
Not available

Loretta Young, Lew Cody, John Wayne (Gordon Wales), Joan Marsh, Joyce Compton. Directed by Sidney Lanfield. b&w; 72 mins. ©1931 Fox Film Corp. AFI: 71-72 mins.; copyrighted: 6,438' [71m:32s]; Film Daily: 80 mins.; Variety: 72 mins. The only known print has one reel missing.

 
 
 

Girls Demand Excitement

Fox Film Corp. (1931)
Not available

Virginia Cherrill, John Wayne (Peter Brooks), Marguerite Churchill, Edward Nugent, Helen Jerome Eddy. Directed by Seymour Felix. b&w; 67 mins. ©1931 Fox Film Corp. AFI: 64 or 68 mins.; copyrighted: 6,050' [67m:13s]; BBFC: 63m:27s; Film Daily: 79 mins.; Variety: 64 mins. Announced to be released on DVD-R by Fox Cinema Archives in early 2016, but still unreleased.

 
 

The Big Trail

Fox Film Corp. (1930)
Fox 2007535 (keep case)

John Wayne (Breck Coleman), Marguerite Churchill, El Brendel, Tully Marshall, Tyrone Power [Sr.]. Directed by Raoul Walsh. b&w; standard 35mm; 108 mins. and Grandeur [70mm/4 perf. vertical/24fps]/2:1; 122 mins. ©1930 Fox Film Corp. TJWF: 158 mins.; AFI: 14,200' [126m:13s; see notes] for 70mm Grandeur version and 11,314' for 35mm version [125m:42s]; Motion Picture News: 11,116' [123m:30s] for 35mm version; BBFC: 109m:45s. DVD release: 5-20-03 (1.33:1; 2.0 stereo [simulated] and 2.0 mono; 108m:08s including exit music); 5-13-08: 2-disc special edition (2.10:1 anamorphic; 2.0 stereo [simulated] and 2.0 mono; 121m:32s including exit music; cover shown on hover; also includes the full-frame 2003 release). (See notes for the Grandeur running time and the foreign versions.)

 
 

Cheer Up and Smile

Fox Film Corp. (1930)
Not available

Arthur Lake, Dixie Lee, Olga Baclanova, “Whispering” Jack Smith, Johnny Arthur, [John Wayne (Roy) uncredited]. Directed by Sidney Lanfield. b&w; 64 mins. ©1930 Fox Film Corp. TJWF: 66 mins.; AFI and copyrighted: 5,730' [63m:40s]; Motion Picture News: 5,600' [62m:13s]; Film Daily: 76 mins.; Variety: 63 mins.

 
 
 

Rough Romance

Fox Film Corp. (1930)
Not available on DVD

George O'Brien, Antonio Moreno, Helen Chandler, Noel Francis, David Hartford, [John Wayne uncredited]. Directed by A. F. Erickson. b&w; 54 mins. ©1930 Fox Film Corp. TJWF: 56 mins.; AFI and copyrighted: 4,800' [53m:20s]; Film Daily: 55 mins.; Variety: 57 mins. Print in circulation is 53m:31s. Principal outdoor scenes filmed before Born Reckless; interiors, completed about two months after location filming, were delayed due to the illness of Helen Chandler.

 
 
 

Born Reckless

Fox Film Corp. (1930)
Fox 2248274 (keep case)

Edmund Lowe, Catherine Dale Owen, Frank Albertson, Marguerite Churchill, William Harrigan, [John Wayne uncredited]. Directed by John Ford. b&w; 77 mins. ©1930 Fox Film Corp. TJWF: 82 mins.; AFI and copyrighted: 7,400' [82m:13s]; Variety: 73 mins. Also includes Pilgrimage (1933). DVD release: 12-4-2007 (2.0 mono; 76m:36s).

 
 
 

Men Without Women

Fox Film Corp. (1930)
Fox 4396982 [made-to-order DVD-R] (keep case; Region 0)

Kenneth MacKenna, Frank Albertson, Farrell Macdonald (MacDonald), Warren Hymer, Paul Page, [John Wayne uncredited]. Directed by John Ford. b&w; 73 mins. ©1929 Fox Film Corp. TJWF: 77 mins.; AFI and copyrighted: 7,774' [86m:22s]; Motion Picture News: 7,246' [80m:30s]; Film Daily: 77 mins.; Variety: 76 mins. No complete sound version known to exist. The DVD-R is derived from an international work print, with mostly intertitles and very limited sound. DVD-R release: 10-20-2015 (2.0 mono; 73m:12s [73m:24s•]).

 
 
 
     
     
     
     
     
     
 
1920's
     
  Running times for silent films based on film footage are not included. As stated in Exhibitors Herald-World in 1930: “Projectors are now designed for a film speed of 90 feet per minute—the same as the fixed speed for sound film—but the rate at which silent film is actually run varies from 70 to 110 feet per minute, and infrequently is as high as 125 feet per minute.”  
     

The Lone Star Ranger

Fox Film Corp. (1929 [see notes for release date])
Not available on DVD

George O'Brien, Sue Carol, Warren Hymer, Roy Stewart, Russell Simpson, [John Wayne uncredited]. Directed by A. F. Erickson. b&w; also released silent; 66 mins. ©1929 Fox Film Corp. TJWF: 64 mins.; AFI: 5,736' [63m:44s] for sound version and 5,948' for silent version; Motion Picture News: 5,940' [66m:00s] for sound version; Film Daily: 64 mins. The version in circulation is an international work print, with music and sound effects (67m:31s). View an audioless video clip here.

 

The Forward Pass

First National (1929)
No print known to exist

Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Loretta Young, Guinn Williams, Marion Byron, Phyllis Crane, [John Wayne uncredited]. Directed by Edward F. Cline. b&w; also released silent; 81 mins. ©1929 First National Pictures, Inc. TJWF: 80 mins.; AFI: 7,246' [80m:30s] for sound version and 4,920' for silent version; copyrighted: 81 mins.

 
 
 

Words and Music

Fox Film Corp. (1929)
No print known to exist

Lois Moran, David Percy, Helen Twelvetrees, William Orlamond, Elizabeth Patterson, Duke Morrison [John Wayne] (Pete Donahue). Directed by James Tinling. b&w; also released silent; 72 mins. ©1929 Fox Film Corp. TJWF: 65 mins.; copyrighted: 5,745' [63m:50s]; AFI: 6,500' [72m:13s] for sound version and 5,745' for silent version.

 
 
 

Salute

Fox Film Corp. (1929)
Not available on DVD

George O'Brien, Helen Chandler, Joyce Compton, William Janney, Stepin Fetchit, [John Wayne (Bill) uncredited]. Directed by John Ford. b&w; also released silent [see top of notes]; 85 mins. ©1929 Fox Film Corp. TJWF: 83-86 mins.; AFI and copyrighted: 7,610' [84m:33s]; Film Daily, and Motion Picture News: 8,500' [94m:26s]. Print in circulation is 83m:50s.

 
 
 

The Black Watch    UK: King of the Khyber Rifles

Fox Film Corp. (1929)
Not available on DVD

Victor McLaglen, Myrna Loy, David Torrence, David Rollins, Cyril Chadwick, [John Wayne uncredited]. Directed by John Ford. b&w; also released silent [see top of notes]; 94 mins. ©1929 Fox Film Corp. TJWF: 98 mins.; AFI: 8,487' [94m:18s]. Print in circulation is 91m:20s; a better print, with French subtitles, is also in circulation (87m:45s).

 
 
 

Speakeasy

Fox Film Corp. (1929)
No print known to exist

Lola Lane, Paul Page, Sharon Lynn, Warren Hymer, Helen Ware, [John Wayne uncredited]. Directed by Benjamin Stoloff. b&w; also released silent [see top of notes]; 64 mins. ©1929 Fox Film Corp. AFI: 5,775' [64m:10s].

 
 
 

Strong Boy

Fox Film Corp. (1929)
No print known to exist

Victor McLaglen, Leatrice Joy, J. Farrell MacDonald, Clyde Cook, Kent Sanderson, [John Wayne uncredited]. Directed by John Ford. b&w; silent with sound sequences (music and effects); also released silent; 62 mins. ©1929 Fox Film Corp. TJWF: 78 mins.; AFI: 5,567' [61m:51s] for sound version and 5,526' for silent version.

 
 
 

Noah's Ark

Warner Bros. (1928)
Warner Bros. 27682 [made-to-order DVD-R] (keep case; Region 0)

Dolores Costello, George O'Brien, Noah Beery, Louise Fazenda, Gwynn Williams, [John Wayne uncredited]. Directed by Michael Curtiz. b&w; silent with sound sequences (talking, effects and music); also released silent; 108 mins. including overture and exit music. ©1928 Warner Brothers Pictures, Inc. A “Warner Brothers/Vitaphone Production.” Originally released in 1928 at 135 mins.; AFI: 9,507' [105m:38s] for sound version and 9,058' for silent version. DVD-R release: 3-8-11 (2.0 mono; 107m:49s with overture and exit music; 99m:43s without overture and exit music).

 
 

Hangman's House

Fox Film Corp. (1928)
Fox 2248272 (keep case)

Victor McLaglen, June Collyer, Earle Foxe, Larry Kent, Hobart Bosworth, [John Wayne uncredited]. Directed by John Ford. b&w; silent; 71 mins. ©1928 Fox Film Corp. TJWF: 75 mins.; AFI: 6,518'; Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World: 6,430'. Also includes 3 Bad Men (1926). Also released on VHS by Critics' Choice Video (Killiam Collection print; 72 mins.). DVD release: 12-4-2007 (5.0 Surround and 2.0 stereo; 70m:53s).

 
 

Four Sons

Fox Film Corp. (1928)
Fox [no catalog #] (slim case)

Margaret Mann, James Hall, Charles Morton, Francis X. Bushman, Jr., George Meeker, [John Wayne uncredited]. Directed by John Ford. b&w; silent with sound sequences (music and effects); also released silent; 96 mins. ©1928 Fox Film Corp. TJWF: 100 mins.; AFI: 8,962'–9,412'. Included in the 5-disc The Ford at Fox Collection: Silent Epics box set (cover shown on hover) and the 21-disc The Ford at Fox Collection, but not available as an individual title. DVD release: 12-4-2007 (5.1 Surround and 2.0 stereo [original music and sound effects not included on print]; 96m:04s [96m:25s•]). The film was previewed in San Jose, California, late November 1927 under its working title, Grandma Bernle Learns Her Letters.

 
 

The Drop Kick    UK: Glitter

First National (1927)
Nostalgia Family Video 1326 (keep case; Region 0 DVD-R)

Richard Barthelmess, Barbara Kent, Dorothy Revier, Eugene Strong, Alberta Vaughn, [John Wayne uncredited]. Directed by Millard Webb. b&w with tinted sequences; silent; 68 mins. ©[never registered and no year on print] First National Pictures, Inc. TJWF: 65 mins.; AFI: 6,819' or 6,900'; Motion Picture News: 6,802'. DVD-R release: 2004 (2.0 stereo; 68m:17s). Also released on DVD-R, from a different print source and with a different musical score, by Grapevine Video in 2010 (64 mins.; cover shown on hover).

 
 

Mother Machree

Fox Film Corp. (1927)
Not available on DVD

Belle Bennett, Neil Hamilton, Victor McLaglen, Constance Howard, Philippe De Lacy, [John Wayne uncredited]. Directed by John Ford. b&w with tinted sequences; silent with sound sequences (music and effects); also released silent; 75 mins. ©1927 Fox Film Corp. Filmed before Annie Laurie. TJWF: 75 mins.; AFI: 6,807'. No complete print known to exist, with three reels missing. The print in circulation has music but no effects (29m:16s). In an October 21, 1926 trade advert, Fox reported the film completed and awaiting release. Playing in London in September 1927 and Australia in December 1927, its general release was delayed with the addition of Movietone sound.

 
 
 

Annie Laurie

MGM (1927)
Not available on DVD

Lillian Gish, Norman Kerry, Creighton Hale, Joseph Striker, Hobart Bosworth, [John Wayne uncredited]. Directed by John S. Robertson. b&w with Technicolor sequences; silent; 99 mins. ©1927 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Distributing Corp. TJWF: 80 mins.; AFI: 8,730'. The print in circulation (100m:28s), with the Technicolor sequences intact, is recorded directly from a monitor with the timecode present (which shows a running time of 98m:48s).

 
 
 

The Great K & A Train Robbery

Fox Film Corp. (1926)
Grapevine Video [no catalog #] (keep case; Region 0 DVD-R)

Tom Mix, Tony the Wonder Horse, Dorothy Dwan, William Walling, Harry Grippe, [John Wayne uncredited]. Directed by Lewis Seiler. b&w with tinted sequences; silent; 53 mins. ©1926 Fox Film Corp. TJWF: 55 mins.; AFI: 4,800'. Also released on VHS (cover shown on hover) by Critics' Choice Video (Killiam Collection print; 53m:04s). DVD-R release: 2003. The two versions in circulation have different musical scores.

 
 

Bardelys the Magnificent

MGM (1926)
Flicker Alley FA0013 (2-disc keep case; Region 0)

John Gilbert, Eleanor Boardman, Roy D'Arcy, Lionel Belmore, Emily Fitzroy, [John Wayne uncredited]. Directed by King Vidor. b&w; silent; 90 mins. ©1926 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp. TJWF: 93 mins.; AFI: 8,536'. No complete print known to exist (one reel missing). Also includes Monte Cristo (1922). DVD release: 7-14-09 (2.0 stereo; 89m:36s [90m:04s•] including reconstructed missing reel).

 
 
 

The Shamrock Handicap

Fox (1926)
Not available on DVD

Janet Gaynor, Leslie Fenton, Willard Louis, J. Farrell MacDonald, Claire McDowell, [John Wayne uncredited]. Directed by John Ford. b&w; silent; 66 mins. ©1926 Fox Film Corp. AFI: 5,685'; Motion Picture News: 5,866'. The print in circulation runs 66m:15s. View a video clip here.

 
     
     
 
 

Brown of Harvard

MGM (1926)
Not available on DVD

William Haines, Jack Pickford, Mary Brian, Mary Alden, Francis X. Bushman, Jr., [John Wayne uncredited]. Directed by Jack Conway. b&w; silent; 85 mins. ©1926 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp. TJWF: 80 mins.; AFI: 7,941'. Released on VHS (cover shown) by Critics' Choice Video (Killiam Collection print; 84m:57s).

     
     

John Wayne has been billed the conventional way as producer for only one film, The Alamo (1960). His first three productions, for Republic Pictures (Angel and the Badman, The Fighting Kentuckian and Bullfighter and the Lady), were all billed as “A John Wayne Production.” With the formation of Wayne-Fellows Productions (later called Batjac Productions and briefly Batjac Enterprises), some films were credited as being produced by Robert Fellows while others were billed only under the company name. Island in the Sky (1953), The High and the Mighty (1954) and Blood Alley (1955), films in which John Wayne starred, have no producer credited, nor do Track of the Cat (1954) and Good-bye, My Lady (1956) which appear below, a list of films produced by Wayne's production company where he did not appear on-screen. (All the DVDs are also available in PAL except Hondo and the Apaches, Escort West, China Doll and Gun the Man Down.)

 
 
Miscellaneous
     

Hondo and the Apaches

MGM [foreign countries only] (1967)
Vintage Home Entertainment 2015 (keep case with slipcase; Region 0)
Not officially available on DVD or VHS

Ralph Taeger, Kathie Browne, Michael Rennie, Noah Beery [Jr.], Gary Clarke. Directed by Lee H. Katzin. Metrocolor; 73 mins. [see notes]. ©1966 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc. Co-produced with Batjac Productions, Inc. and Fenady Associates, Inc. Produced by Andrew J. Fenady. Released theatrically to foreign houses only. TCM print: 86m:15s; BBFC: 86m:15s. Released on VHS by Rawhide Video (cover shown on hover), the same 73-minute version as the DVD (a VHS transfer). French poster shown on click. View a video clip as broadcast on TCM. DVD imprint: 2-25-03 (1.33:1 [open-matte version]; 2.0 mono; 73m:01s [73m:23s•]). (See notes.)

 
 

Escort West

United Artists (1959)
MGM 1008321 (keep case)

Victor Mature, Elaine Stewart, Faith Domergue, Reba Waters, Noah Beery [Jr.]. Directed by Francis D. Lyon. b&w; CinemaScope/2.35:1; 76 mins. ©1958 Batjac Enterprises, Inc. A “Romina Production.” Produced by Robert E. Morrison and Nate H. Edwards. MPAA #19018. DVD release: 5-17-05 (2.30:1 anamorphic and 1.33:1; 2.0 mono; 75m:55s [76m:10s•]).

 
 

China Doll

United Artists (1958)
Fox/MGM 107382 (keep case)

Victor Mature, Li Li Hua, Ward Bond, Bob Mathias, Johnny Desmond. Directed by Frank Borzage. b&w; 1.85:1; 99 mins. ©1958 Batjac Enterprises, Inc. A “Romina Production.” Produced by Frank Borzage. MPAA #18803. Copyrighted: 88 mins.; AFI: 99 mins.; BBFC: 99m:17s; US general release: 85 mins. DVD release: 4-24-07 (1.85:1 anamorphic; 2.0 stereo [simulated] and 2.0 mono; 99m:03s [99m:18s•]).

 
 

Man in the Vault

RKO (1956)
Paramount 88765 (keep case)

William Campbell, Karen Sharpe, Anita Ekberg, Berry Kroger, Paul Fix. Directed by Andrew V. McLaglen. b&w; 1.85:1; 73 mins. ©1955 Batjac Productions, Inc. Produced by Robert E. Morrison. MPAA #17525. Filmed before Gun the Man Down, Seven Men from Now and Good-bye, My Lady. DVD release: 12-20-05 (1.78:1 anamorphic; 2.0 mono; 72m:46s [73m:14s•]).

 
 

Gun the Man Down

United Artists (1956)
Fox/MGM 107551 (keep case)

James Arness, Angie Dickinson, Emile Meyer, Robert Wilke, Harry Carey, Jr. Directed by Andrew V. McLaglen. b&w; 1.85:1; 76 mins. ©1956 Batjac Productions, Inc. Produced by Robert E. Morrison. MPAA #18017. Copyrighted: 78 mins.; AFI: 74 or 78 mins. Released to television in 1961 as Arizona Mission. DVD release: 5-22-07 (1.80:1 anamorphic; 2.0 mono; 76m:10s).

 
 

Seven Men from Now

Warner Bros. (1956)
Paramount 88760 (keep case)

Randolph Scott, Gail Russell, Lee Marvin, Walter Reed, John Larch. Directed by Budd Boetticher. WarnerColor; 1.85:1; 78 mins. ©1956 Batjac Productions, Inc. Produced by Andrew V. McLaglen and Robert E. Morrison. MPAA #17817. DVD release: 12-20-05 (1.78:1 anamorphic; 2.0 mono; 77m:30s [77m:58s•]).

 
 

Good-bye, My Lady

Warner Bros. (1956)
Warner Bros. 28784 [made-to-order DVD-R] (keep case; Region 0)

Walter Brennan, Phil Harris, Brandon de Wilde, Sidney Poitier, William Hopper. Directed by William A. Wellman. b&w; 1.85:1; 95 mins. ©1956 Batjac Productions, Inc. No producer credited. MPAA #17790. AFI: 91 or 94-95 mins.; BFI: 8,522' [94m:41s]. Reissued in 1959 as The Boy and the Laughing Dog. DVD-R release: 12-14-10 (1.78:1 anamorphic; 2.0 mono; 95m:01s).

 
 

Track of the Cat

Warner Bros. (1954)
Paramount 88768 (keep case)

Robert Mitchum, Teresa Wright, Diana Lynn, Tab Hunter, Beulah Bondi. Directed by William A. Wellman. WarnerColor; CinemaScope/2.55:1; 102 mins. ©1954 Wayne-Fellows Productions, Inc. No producer credited. MPAA #17120. DVD release: 12-20-05 (2.55:1 anamorphic; 4.0 and 2.0 Surround; 102m:11s [102m:39s•]).

 
 

Ring of Fear

Warner Bros. (1954)
Paramount 88767 (keep case)

Clyde Beatty, Mickey Spillane, Pat O'Brien, Sean McClory, Marian Carr. Directed by James Edward Grant. WarnerColor; CinemaScope/2.55:1; 93 mins. ©1954 Wayne-Fellows Productions, Inc. Produced by Robert Fellows. MPAA #16800. DVD release: 12-20-05 (2.55:1 anamorphic; 4.0 and 2.0 Surround; 92m:43s [93m:11s•]).

 
 

Plunder of the Sun

Warner Bros. (1953)
Paramount 88766 (keep case)

Glenn Ford, Diana Lynn, Patricia Medina, Francis L. Sullivan, Sean McClory. Directed by John Farrow. b&w; 82 mins. ©1953 Wayne-Fellows Productions, Inc. Produced by Robert Fellows. MPAA #16295. DVD release: 12-20-05 (2.0 mono; 81m:43s [82m:11s•]).

 
 

Bullfighter and the Lady

Republic (1951)
Olive Films OF681 (keep case)

Robert Stack, Joy Page, Gilbert Roland, Virginia Grey, John Hubbard. Directed by Budd Boetticher. b&w; 87 mins. ©1951 Republic Pictures Corp. MPAA #15066. A “John Wayne Production” (as producer). BBFC: 87m:03s. Restored in 1986 to 124 mins. The 87-minute theatrical version was initially released on VHS by Republic. DVD release: 7-30-13 (1.0 mono; 123m:40s [without new end credits]; 124m:26s [with new end credits]; [124m:51s•]).

 

   
 
 
 

All Blu-rays are referenced by hovering over the Blu-ray icon on the right side of the filmography entries, where a pop-up will appear with the cover and details. All are encoded at 23.97fps, including those from Europe, unless otherwise noted. Preference is always given to the US version if others exist, even if a European version was released first.

Below are two compilations which do not fit within the conventional guidelines. Upscaled titles such as these do not appear in the main filmography with the Blu-ray icon.

     
     

The bastardization of Blu-ray: a collection of 28 public domain films and serials, the bulk of which feature John Wayne, upscaled to 1080i from poor standard definition sources. From a company called Great Movies (catalog #GM71205) and distributed by HMH Hamburger Medien Haus Vertriebs GmbH, the German disc contains almost 1800 minutes of content.

The John Wayne titles, in no particular order: Texas Terror, The Dawn Rider, Paradise Canyon, The Trail Beyond, The Star Packer, Sagebrush Trail, Winds of the Wasteland, Blue Steel, Randy Rides Alone, Born to the West, The Man from Utah, Angel and the Badman, Lawless Range, The Lawless Frontier, The Desert Trail, The Lucky Texan, The Hurricane Express, and The Three Musketeers.

Included more as a curio, as Blu-ray becomes more mainstream there will likely be more such discs released, taking advantage of the format's storage capacity.

 
     

Another Blu-ray collection of public domain material, this time all specific to John Wayne (486 minutes worth). Like the German compilation above, these are also upscaled to 1080i from standard definition sources. From Gaiam, Inc. (catalog #05-58925; Region A). Released May 6, 2012.

The titles: McLintock!, The Dawn Rider, Texas Terror, The Trail Beyond, The Star Packer, The Hurricane Express and the trailer compilation John Wayne: American Hero of the Movies.

 
 
 

     
     

The McLintock! Blu-ray from Soul Media, one of several films licensed from London-based Hollywood Classics Ltd., which have European home entertainment licensing rights to a small library of films from Universal, Fox, and MGM/UA. (View the Blu-ray's mastering defect.)

Besides the Blu-ray debut of McLintock!, Soul Media also had the debut of The Barbarian and the Geisha.

The labels Koch Media and Soul Media have begun to release some of Hollywood Classics' titles on Blu-ray not yet available in their native country (Hellfighters, The Conqueror, and Legend of the Lost). Other John Wayne titles that Hollywood Classics Ltd. has licensing rights to, excluding those already released on Blu-ray in some form: The Alamo, Allegheny Uprising, Brannigan, Jet Pilot, Pittsburgh, and Sea Spoilers.

 

 

About Blu-ray and DVD Running Times

Running times for Blu-ray appear longer in a player's on-screen display than they do for the DVD equivalent even though the prints are exactly the same. As an example, The Searchers DVD displays a running time of 1:58:40 and the Blu-ray 1:58:47, a discrepancy of seven seconds. Like all NTSC DVDs, if one actually times them with a stopwatch in real-time they are longer than the player's on-screen display; Blu-rays, on the other hand, always show this in real-time (the longer time is reflected). So both formats have the same duration in real-time but are reported differently because of timecode differences (see below), and both play film slightly slower than what one would see in a theater using a perfectly calibrated 35mm projector if one existed.

In other words, NTSC DVDs play back 1.001 times longer than 35mm film, as does Blu-ray—whose origins are still entrenched in NTSC since they generally use 23.976 fps just like their DVD counterparts. The longer NTSC play back time is also applicable to film content not soft-telecined at 23.976 fps, i.e. hard-telecined at 29.97 fps. So for NTSC, both DVD and Blu-ray play back about 3.6 seconds longer for each hour of 35mm film.

A DVD, for instance, that has 194,626 frames of NTSC video at 29.97 fps will be reported as 1 hour 48 minutes 14 seconds and 2 frames (0.07 seconds) using drop-frame timecodes, or simply 108m:14.1s. Using non-drop-frame timecodes, reflective of film time, the running time would be reported as 1 hour 48 minutes 7 seconds and 16 frames (0.53 seconds), or simply 108m:7.5s. Using that same 194,626-frame NTSC video and performing an inverse telecine would yield 155,700 frames, which if projected at 24 fps would be 108m:7.5s—the same running time using non-drop-frame timecodes.

It is interesting to note that the DVD for How the West Was Won (the newly mastered version) has the same on-screen time as the Blu-ray. The film is contained on two DVDs, and when the two on-screen times are added together they total 164m:41s, just like the Blu-ray. However, disc two of the DVD set has 11 seconds of nothing at the very start: the on-screen start time is simply offset by that much, perhaps to avoid the confusion of comparing DVD and Blu-ray running times.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VHSes from my collection (warts and all) of John Wayne's post-1939 films which have never been officially released on Region 1 DVD as of 2012. Since that time Olive Films has released six of the titles. The passing of time has made VHS (and of course Betamax) nostalgic, the format now more valuable—at least to me—for its cover art than anything else. But for these titles this was the most common NTSC format available, except for those people who had LaserDisc (what titles were available) or later made or purchased DVD±R encodings of the VHSes and LaserDiscs themselves, or acquired copies from television broadcasts or other sources. Many people, including myself, would get a region-free multi-format player and purchase DVDs from foreign markets, not encumbered by region coding or the PAL format. (Click here for a reformatted, larger view of the VHSes.)

 

Before looking at the tapes shown above, it should be noted that Betamax and VHS were not the first home video systems to release Hollywood movies. Discounting actual film, which generally meant highly condensed 8mm titles which had been around since the 1930's, the first video-based format was Cartrivision, introduced to consumers in 1972. Marketed by Cartridge Television, Inc., tapes with licensed Hollywood feature films could be rented and played only once, with a locking mechanism that prevented them from being rewound and watched again. So John Wayne actually made his home video debut in 1972, with the titles Stagecoach, Flying Tigers, Sands of Iwo Jima, Rio Grande, and The Quiet Man. Cartrivision's feature film library was mostly from Columbia Pictures, which was a partner in the distribution network. The ill-fated format lasted just over a year, eventually supplanted by Beta and VHS a few years later. (The Cartrivision rental tapes, denoted by their red cases, are very rare today. A more detailed example of one offered for sale, denoted by their black cases, can be seen here.)

 

Hondo and the Apaches is included although it is not an official studio release. The VHS was released in 1993 by Rawhide Video but the film was not registered for copyright until 1994 (by Turner Entertainment Company), the label incorrectly assuming the title was not under legal protection. A year earlier, CK Entertainment also had released the film on videocassette with the same assumption, one in which there are no potential legal penalties until actual registration. Thus, release of the film previous to its July 31, 1994, copyright registration did not contravene US law. All the subsequent VHS releases by various public domain labels seem to have used the same poor quality 73-minute print, including the 2003 DVD by Vintage Home Entertainment, presented by Front Row Entertainment before the film begins, whose 1994 VHS can be seen here. Turner Classic Movies is the best source for the film, which runs the full 86 minutes as seen in foreign theaters.

I Married a Woman is an official release although the case and tape from 1985, released by United Home Video, do not credit the copyright owner, not unusual for some early VHSes. Early catalogs show VCI Home Video as the film's official distributor for sale and rental, and in 1985 that company's product fell under the United Home Video umbrella, which in turn was owned by United Entertainment, Inc. The 1990 LaserDisc from Turner Home Entertainment, like the videocassette, does not have the color sequences, although the Turner Classic Movies print does and is letterboxed.

The Circus World VHS shown was released in 1991 by Best Film & Video Corp., which was also involved with the 1993 LaserDisc, both officially licensed by P.C. Films Corp., the film's previous owner but evidently now in the hands of a French finance company. North American distribution rights are now owned by The Weinstein Company, which was poised to release the film on DVD under The Miriam Collection banner in 2008 but was cancelled. Even earlier, Disney had announced a DVD release but was cancelled as well. At the time Disney owned Miramax Films, a somewhat autonomous subsidiary run by Bob and Harvey Weinstein, who left Disney in 2005 to form The Weinstein Company and brought their rights to the Samuel Bronston library with them. The film, along with three other Bronston titles, was initially released on VHS and Beta by VCI Home Video in 1979, licensed by P.C. Films Corp., a company set up by Bronston's creditors after his bankruptcy. View the 1987 VHS and the 1991 VHS. Using stills, view a comparison of some home video releases here, or a video comparison here.

Angel and the Badman fell into the public domain in 1975 because its copyright was not renewed, becoming a staple of public domain labels. Republic never officially released the film on Region 1 DVD, although did release it on VHS (1992 45th Anniversary edition shown) and LaserDisc in 1990, culled from the original film negative which was later cleaned up for the 45th Anniversary edition released in 1992 including a new LaserDisc. Universal UK released a beautiful print—the same one used for the 45th Anniversary edition—on DVD in 2006, but on this side of the pond fans relied on PD labels or the Hal Roach release.

Lady from Louisiana, Lady for a Night, and War of the Wildcats (In Old Oklahoma) were released on DVD by Universal UK, the latter two being lovely prints. Wheel of Fortune (A Man Betrayed) was released on DVD in Spain but was culled from the VHS (Beta version here). Lady from Louisiana has been released on DVD in the UK, Italy and Spain, the latter two culled from the official UK version, which unfortunately was struck from an NTSC master and the same print used on the VHS (although of better quality because of DVD's increased resolution).

The Bullfighter and the Lady VHS shown is the restored version, released in 1989 and LaserDisc in 1992. Years earlier, NTA Home Entertainment had released the original 87-minute version.

All the Republic VHSes shown were released by Republic Pictures Home Video, and all were released earlier with different artwork by its predecessor, NTA Home Entertainment. Even earlier, most of the films were released by The Nostalgia Merchant before Republic entered the video distribution business with their own label.

The Alamo is of course the unedited 202-minute roadshow version, released in 1992 on VHS and LaserDisc by MGM/UA, which also released a 172-minute version (with additional music only) in the same formats in 1990. Only the standard 162-minute version has made it to DVD, initially released on VHS and Beta by CBS/Fox in the early 1980's. Besides the roadshow version, the 1992 LaserDisc also included the uncut documentary John Wayne's “The Alamo,” running 26 minutes longer than the 42-minute version released on the roadshow VHS and cut DVD.

Another unedited version, although of less importance, is Without Reservations. The UK DVD released by DD Video (Leisure View Video) run six minutes longer than the US DVD released by Warner Home Video. To make matters more confusing, the VHS and LaserDisc are 19 seconds shorter than the DVD, including the same print broadcast on Turner Classic Movies. The VHS released in 1990 by Turner Home Entertainment even advertised itself as the “Original Studio Version.” Warner's DVD is region-coded 1/3/4, not including Region 2 so not to infringe, it appears, on the territorial rights of the UK version (which ironically has no region coding). So there are three different versions of the film in circulation. It appears that Warner cut the film to make it more fluid and also removed some scenes that could be deemed offensive in a post-war America.

With this filmography covering Cartrivision, Beta, VHS, LaserDisc, CED, DVD, HD-DVD and Blu-ray, one other format must be mentioned. A few Hollywood studios released content on VCD (Video CD) in North America and Europe just before the advent of DVD. The VCD format, popular in Asia to this day, was mostly frowned upon because of its poor video quality and lack of protection schemes. Paramount and MGM were among the big players who dabbled in the format from 1994-1995. So VCD was a short-lived home video distribution method except for Asia and other parts of the world, where its proliferation warranted Hollywood's attention and product. No John Wayne films were known to be released on VCD in what would become Region 1 and 2 for DVD.

 

 

 

Notes

 

Fox Silents: Fox announced in early 1929 that it intended to release talkers only, but stated in July 1929 that it would have 34 silent versions for release to unwired houses during the 1929–30 season. Speakeasy, The Black Watch, and Salute appear in the AFI Catalog with no mention of silent versions, yet Fox announced that these would also be released without sound. The Black Watch, for instance, was reviewed in May of 1929 in The Film Daily (a major source for the AFI) as sound with no silent version; Fox's subsequent change in policy has not been reflected in the AFI Catalog. Four Sons also is listed in the AFI Catalog with no mention of a silent version, yet a Fox advert from June 29, 1928, stated that a silent version was “now ready.”

Production Chronology: The production chronology for Wayne's films between 1932 and mid-1933 is confusing, propagated by inaccurate or missing production information in the AFI Catalog and Fred Landesman's book, The John Wayne Filmography. The period is a source of much confusion with biographers, too, who have attempted to chronicle a disparate chronology based mainly on release dates. Also creating confusion are overlapping start and completion dates, which makes Wayne's 'studio hopping' impossible to document accurately because, with his minor roles, he would have showed up on the set infrequently, the timeline of those appearances unknown.

The main filmography lists films by order of the earliest copyright or release date (including premiere), with a note (filmed before) if a production predates another. What is listed below, sorted by completion date, will further define the use of “filmed before” in the main filmography between 1932 and mid-1933.

Following the production date is the source used for that information: TJWF (The John Wayne Filmography), AFI (American Film Institute Catalog of Feature Films), FD (The Film Daily), HR (The Hollywood Reporter), and HF (Hollywood Filmograph). Following the source is the earliest release date and copyright date. Dates for films previewed to the trades and reviewed earlier than what is listed are not included.

 

Texas Cyclone

  Columbia  

Jan 5—Jan 11, 1932

AFI

   

Feb 24, 1932
© Feb 15, 1932

The Shadow of the Eagle

  Mascot  

late Jan—late Feb 1932

HF

   

Mar 12, 1932
© never registered

Two-Fisted Law

  Columbia  

Apr 6—Apr 11, 1932

AFI

   

Jun 8, 1932
© May 19, 1932

Lady and Gent

  Paramount  

early May—late May 1932

HF

   

Jul 15, 1932
© Jul 15, 1932

Ride Him, Cowboy

  Warner  

late May—early Jun 1932

FD

   

Aug 27, 1932
© Aug 23, 1932

The Big Stampede

  Warner  

began Jun 24, 1932

AFI

   

Oct 7, 1932
© Sep 28, 1932

The Hurricane Express

  Mascot  

mid-Jul—early Aug 1932

FD

   

Aug 15, 1932
© never registered

The Telegraph Trail

  Warner  

began Aug 11, 1932

FD

   

Mar 18, 1933
© Mar 25, 1933

Haunted Gold

  Warner  

late Sep—early Oct 1932

FD/HF

   

Dec 16, 1932
© Feb 7, 1933

Somewhere in Sonora

  Warner  

late Nov—early Dec 1932

FD/HF

   

May 27, 1933
© May 22, 1933

The Life of Jimmy Dolan

  Warner  

Nov 14—Dec 16, 1932

TJWF

   

May 31, 1933
© June 12, 1933

Central Airport

  Warner  

late Nov 1932—early Jan 1933

FD/HF

   

Apr 15, 1933
© Apr 10, 1933

Baby Face

  Warner  

early Jan—late Jan 1933

HR

   

Jun 22, 1933
© Jul 16, 1933

The Man from Monterey

  Warner  

mid-Jan—Feb 3, 1933

HR/FD

   

Jul 13, 1933
© Jun 10, 1933

The Three Musketeers

  Mascot  

late Feb—mid-Mar 1933

HR/HF

   

Apr 15, 1933
© Apr 7, 1933

His Private Secretary

  Showmens  

began Apr 24, 1933

HR

   

Jun 10, 1933
© Jun 8, 1933

Riders of Destiny

  Monogram  

early Aug—mid-Aug 1933

FD/HF

   

Sep 24, 1933
© Jan 22, 1934

College Coach

  Warner  

early Sep—late Sep 1933

FD

   

Nov 4, 1933
© Nov 18, 1933

 

That's My Boy is not included in the list because Wayne was not on the set at any time, his involvement based on football scenes from the earlier Maker of Men. Also not included is Sweetheart of Sigma Chi, a film Wayne had been cast in, even so far as appearing in pre-production cast photos, but instead made Riders of Destiny while the former was being lensed at the same time. Production on Sweetheart of Sigma Chi began August 11, 1933 and had its premiere on September 30. (Note that after principal photography, Central Airport had additional scenes filmed in early February.)

It should be noted that the six westerns Wayne made for Leon Schlesinger under his Four Star Western banner were actually made independently in conjunction with Warner Bros. (Vitagraph, Inc.). While the last in the series, The Man from Monterey, was being filmed, Schlesinger was negotiating with Wayne to make more of the films and was also making new arrangements after Warner Bros. did not exercise its option for the 1933–34 season. Wayne was under contract to Leon Schlesinger for the Four Star Western films, not Warner Bros.

 

Information in the list above has been gathered from an ongoing project of mine titled the John Wayne Production Chronology: 1926 to 1939, detailing—with annotations—production and release dates.

 

 

An advert from the 1935 Film Daily Year Book

 

 

The Alamo. A few news items from the Motion Picture Daily about the film's running time:

Motion Picture Daily, June 15, 1960:

'Alamo' 3 Hrs., 20 Min.

John Wayne's “The Alamo,” in Todd-AO and Technicolor, will run for three hours and 20 minutes. Scoring of the film by Dimitri Tiomkin has been completed, and a first order of twenty prints, to cost $200,000, has been placed by Wayne. “The Alamo” will be presented on a roadshow basis throughout the world as a United Artists release.

Motion Picture Daily review, October 24, 1960:

Running time, 190 minutes, plus 15 minute intermission. Release, special.

Motion Picture Daily, November 4, 1960:

Wayne Editing 'Alamo' To 160 Minutes

A published report that John Wayne is in Hollywood supervising the excision of approximately 30 minutes of footage from his 191-minute “The Alamo” was confirmed here [New York] yesterday by the Russell Birdwell office, in charge of public relations for the actor-producer-director of the picture now at the Rivoli Theatre here [New York] and several other “hard-ticket” engagements.

The same source said the further editing of the picture would not result in any change in the “hard ticket” policy. The shortened version of the film is expected to be in use at the Rivoli tonight or tomorrow.

Wayne's $12,000,000 epic was found by some critics and audiences to lag in its early stages leading up to the climactic battle scenes. The editing now in progress is believed to be in response to that reaction. The revised film will run approximately 160 minutes, it was said.

Big Jake. Cinema Center Films was the theatrical production arm of CBS Television, which distributed their films in the US by National General Pictures. Rio Lobo and Big Jake are distributed on DVD and Blu-ray by Paramount but under the CBS name.

The Big Trail. The Grandeur version of The Big Trail is sometimes listed as 158 minutes based on the film being 14,200 feet, which in standard 35mm would be 157m:46s. But the film was 70mm, of course, which in that format running at 12.8 frames per foot would be 126m:13s. However, the April 1930 issue of The Motion Picture Projectionist reported: “With “Happy Days,” first Grandeur picture, projector speed was ninety feet per minute. Each foot of film has thirteen frames, and the sprocket perforations are, of course, much wider than 35 millimeter film.”

In his list of corrections and addenda to the book Wide Screen Movies by Robert E. Carr and R.M. Hayes, Daniel J. Sherlock states: “It is clear from the recently restored Grandeur version of The Big Trail that 24 frames per second was used for that film.” Obviously this indicates some confusion based on the initial Grandeur specification. The projector speed of “ninety feet per minute” stated in The Motion Picture Projectionist would equate to 19.5 frames per second. Modern sources say that Grandeur changed to 24 frames per second for The Big Trail.

Premiering on October 2, 1930, the film was reviewed in Motion Picture News on October 11 at “126 mins.,” and in The Film Daily on October 12 as “2 hrs., 5 mins.” Such early reviews must have been based on the Grandeur version. Indeed, Panavision's website has a drawing from the Mitchell Camera Corp., dated March 27, 1930, of their 70mm film dimensions which clearly shows 12.8 frames per foot were used (view a stylized version below). Mitchell cameras were used on The Big Trail, and the company at the time was a corporate bed partner of William Fox. Principal photography began on April 30, 1930, shortly after Mitchell finalized their 70mm specifications.


View Grandeur's dimensions
View the first videocasstte

Motion Picture News listed the 35mm version as 11,116 feet (123m:30s); Exhibitors Herald-World, 11,314 feet (125m:42s). Both trade papers listed the Grandeur version as 14,200 feet. A 35mm version was also released at 9,891 feet (109m:54s). The film was copyrighted at 13,000 feet with no film gauge noted, and its copyright renewal stated “a photoplay in thirteen reels by Fox Film Corp.” The number of 13,000 feet is no doubt 13 reels x 1000 feet of film (the maximum footage of an exchange reel), but at the time it was recommended to keep 35mm footage between 800 and 950 feet per reel. Because of this, no accurate running time can be calculated from such a generalization.

There was no 158-minute version of The Big Trail, a myth based on 14,200 feet being calculated on 35mm film—the running time was 126 minutes. The 35mm version, filmed simultaneously with the 70mm version, was 124–126 minutes.

 

While early into the production of The Big Trail, Fox announced that John Wayne would later be featured in two productions that were never made: Wyoming Wonder, based on the Max Brand story, “Alcatraz,” adapted by Willard Robertson and directed by A.F. Erickson; and No Favors Asked, based on Paul Leicester Ford's story, “The Great K & A Train Robbery,” directed by Alfred Werker.

Both films were to be sound versions of previous Tom Mix westerns, Wyoming Wonder being a remake of his 1922 film, Just Tony.

 

Fox produced four foreign-language versions of The Big Trail with different cast members. Spanish: La gran jornada (directed by David Howard and released in Spain as Horizontes nuevos; starring Jorge Lewis); Italian: Il grande sentiero (directed by Louis Loeffler; starring Franco Corsaro); German: Die grosse Fährte (directed by Lewis Seiler; starring Theo Shall); French: La piste des géants (directed by Pierre Couderc; starring Gaston Glass).

As reported in The Film Daily, December 28, 1930, in a news item titled “Fast Shooting”: “Only 13 days were required by Louis R. Loeffler, director, in shooting the Italian version of “The Big Trail.” Although he is of German descent, Loeffler speaks Italian fluently. The Spanish version of the same picture was finished in 16 days, the French in 18 days and the German in 22 days.”

The foreign versions were not filmed simultaneously with the 70mm and 35mm versions, and only the French version was not released in the US.

Brannigan is presented by Michael Wayne (executive producer), Jules Levy and Arthur Gardner (producers), the same team that made McQ under the Batjac/Levy-Gardner banner. Filmed in England by Wellborn Ltd.

Circus World was announced for release on Region 1 by Disney but never materialized. The Japanese release by Tohokushinsha, although Region 2, provides the best available NTSC source for this title on DVD. It is more readily available in NTSC on a Hong Kong Region 0 release by Garry's Trading Co. (1.70:1 non-anamorphic; 2.0 stereo; 131m:59s [imprint: 12-9-03]). The Universal UK Region 2/4 PAL DVD, as The Magnificent Showman, is full-frame and runs 131m:59s with a mono soundtrack.

The Greatest Story Ever Told. (1) Halliwell's Film Guide: 225 mins. “The film was originally released at 4 hours 20 minutes [260 mins.]. Subsequent versions were at 3 hours 58 minutes [238 mins.], 3 hours 17 minutes [197 mins.], 2 hours 27 minutes [147 mins.] and 2 hours 7 minutes [127 mins.].” (2) The John Wayne Filmography: “The initial version was 250 minutes in length. It was then cut to 222 minutes, then 190 minutes and finally 147.” (3) John Wayne and the Movies: “260 minutes, subsequently cut to 238, then 190, then 147 (G.B.: 197).” (4) Leonard Maltin's Movie Guide: 193 mins. “Originally shown at 225m., then cut to 141m.” (5) The Motion Picture Almanac: 195 mins.

Hellfighters. The initial DVD's aspect ratio is 2.65:1, showing considerably more on the right side of the frame than the 16x9 DVD and foreign Blu-ray.

His Private Secretary. This was the first film produced by Screencraft Productions, formed by Al Alt and Sam Katzman, with David J. Mountan's Showmens Pictures distributing.

Hondo and the Apaches. The DVD—which also includes an unrelated film called The Man Called Noon—is from the initial Front Row Entertainment VHS release which, based on the running time, is probably a television print. Although on a public domain label (Vintage Home Entertainment), the film is still under copyright by MGM (Turner).

The AFI Catalog, in its notes section for the film Hondo, states Hondo and the Apaches was based on the series pilot which never aired on American television. However, in a 1967 newspaper article, Charles Witbeck wrote: “To pay $750,000 for an hour TV pilot that might not sell, the four partners [Batjac, Andrew Fenady, MGM and ABC] decided instead to make an [sic] European film version called “Hondo and The Apaches,” and use it as a pilot.

“With guest stars Michael Rennie, Robert Taylor and Gary Merrill, in addition to series regulars [Ralph] Taeger, Gary Clarke, Noah Beery, Jr., and Kathy Browne, Fenady filmed the picture in 18 days, then shot an additional 15 minutes to fill out two one-hour TV segments which will become the first shows on the air this fall.”

There is no evidence of Hondo and the Apaches ever being released theatrically in the US, but did play theatrically in some non-European countries. Production began in late October 1966. Although presented open-matte, the film is composed for 1.85:1 and was probably released to foreign theaters at 1.66:1.

The Horse Soldiers. A “Mahin-Rackin Production,” after the film's producers John Lee Mahin and Martin Rackin. Presented and copyrighted by The Mirisch Company, Inc., the AFI catalog lists Batjac Productions, Inc. as co-producing with Mirisch. The book John Wayne: American, illustrating the complexities of film production, says the film was a co-production between United Artists, Mahin-Rackin, the Mirisch Company, Batjac, John Ford Productions, and William Holden Productions.

How the West Was Won premiered in England on November 1, 1962, and was released in other parts of the world that year before its American premiere on February 20, 1963. The non-roadshow (general release) version was distributed by MGM.

The Hurricane Express. TJWF: “In the late 1940s an edited 80-minute feature version was released.” The feature version, released directly to television and available on various public domain labels, runs 78m:30s and has the same credits as the serial.

I Married a Woman. Universal-International handled US distribution after the demise of RKO, which co-produced the film with Gomalco Productions.

Jet Pilot. Universal-International handled US distribution after the demise of RKO.

A Lady Takes a Chance. What can only be called a 'straggler' film in Wayne's post-1939 career, A Lady Takes a Chance, copyrighted by Frank Ross, Inc., and made in conjunction with RKO under the working title “Free for All,” was reissued in 1954 as The Cowboy and the Girl with advertising material stating “An Oxyx Picture,” released by Phoenix Films, Inc., which was incorporated in 1953. In 1955 television rights were sold under its original title to Hygo Television Films, Inc., and in the 1960's to Prime TV Films, Inc. Ownership of the film ultimately ended up in the hands of film collector Raymond Rohauer, who renewed the copyright in 1971 under his Film Archives Trading Company. Exclusive videocassette rights were acquired by New York-based Video Tape Network in 1979, VidAmerica in the 1980's, and Republic Entertainment in the 1990's, coinciding with the acquisition of the film's copyright by Republic. The film, now owned by Paramount, has the distinction of being the worst print on home video of Wayne's post-1939 titles.

Legend of the Lost has the MPAA seal on the print but with no certificate number.

The Lone Star Ranger is commonly listed as being released on January 5, 1930, but opened on December 31, 1929, at the Capitol Theater in Dunkirk, New York. The film was copyrighted December 4, 1929, so may have been in release even earlier than December 31.

Pittsburgh was officially released on December 11, 1942, but previously had test runs in six Eastern industrial centers, and Universal had advertised the film for a Thanksgiving release. Reunion in France was trade-shown as Reunion on December 1, 1942, and was retitled and released as a Christmas attraction in 19 key cities.

 

Exploitation at its best: Raiders of the Desert, a 1941 Universal picture that used a little footage from Wayne's I Cover the War, has the Duke first-billed alongside Desert Command which was culled from the serial The Three Musketeers.

The date is January 27, 1950, a ploy used in the 300-seat Mercury Theatre in Buffalo, New York.

 

The Range Feud. Like the other two early Columbia westerns available on DVD, Texas Cyclone and Two-Fisted Law, The Range Feud is derived from a 16mm television print issued by Gail Pictures in the 1950's, with a 1931 copyright statement by Gail Pictures International Corp. Typical of their prints, the credits are bastardized and in this case the title appears as Range Fued. The film was copyrighted and initially advertised as The Range Feud.

Gail Pictures International Corp. was a subsidiary of Hygo Television Films, Inc., which purchased, among other deals, 79 westerns from Columbia Pictures in 1955. The 79-film library was announced to make its television debut on January 1, 1956, WATV, New Jersey, on the station's “Western Prairie Theatre.” In turn, Hygo and its subsidiaries—notably Unity Television Corp.—were purchased in late 1956 by Columbia's Screen Gems subsidiary, all rights, titles and interests of the Columbia westerns returning to the original studio.

Apparently missing from the corporate takeover, however, were the original negatives, which would have been used by Hygo and its affiliates to make 16mm prints for television, with new credits and removal of all references to Columbia Pictures.

Hygo, organized in early 1952 by Jerry Hyams, was co-helmed by Louis Goldstein (the two founders, Hyman-Goldstein, comprise the company name), a former longtime Columbia executive, in charge of various foreign departments, who no doubt influenced the studio to make available some of their “out-of-date” westerns for television beginning in 1954 with Wild Bill Elliott and Russell Hayden titles. That same year, Hygo also acquired 156 “Krazy Kat” cartoons from Columbia.

The three John Wayne titles had their copyrights renewed by Gail Pictures International Corp., then a Columbia subsidiary: The Range Feud (October 8, 1958, R222669); Texas Cyclone (March 2, 1959, R232348); and Two-Fisted Law (July 1, 1959, R238774).

Rio Lobo. Cinema Center Films was the theatrical production arm of CBS Television, which distributed their films in the US by National General Pictures. Rio Lobo and Big Jake are distributed on DVD and Blu-ray by Paramount but under the CBS name.

Texas Cyclone. A television print, the title card says “Gail Pictures presents” with a 1932 copyright statement by Gail Pictures International Corp. The complete cast is listed as Tim McCoy, Shirley Grey, John Wayne, Wheeler MacDonald [sic], Vernon Dent, Mary Gordon and Walter Brenan [sic].

Two-Fisted Law. A television print, the title card says “Gail Pictures presents” with a 1932 copyright statement by Gail Pictures International Corp. The complete cast is listed as Tim McCoy, John Wayne, Walter Brennan, Tully Marshall, Alice Day, Wheeler Oakman, Wallace McDonald [sic] and Richard Alexander.

Westward Ho. Filmed simultaneously with Lawless Range but released first, this was the first film under the Republic banner after Monogram was taken over by Republic.

 

 

 

 

 

Sources: The John Wayne Filmography (TJWF). John Wayne and the Movies (JWATM). John Wayne: American (JWA).

No filmography of John Wayne will ever be complete, since he worked as a card-carrying union member (IATSE) doing prop work at Fox for directors like John Ford, Raoul Walsh and Ben Stoloff. While doing such work he may have appeared as an extra in a number of undocumented films that he propped, not uncommon during the days when unions were not as stringent as today. According to Chris Enss, co-author of the book, The Young Duke: The Early Life of John Wayne, “Prior to The Big Trail being done he had propped more than eighty pictures.”

Even growing up as a child Duke would spend time at the Kalem Studio lot in Glendale, California, sometimes doing odd jobs for the friendly grips. So technically John Wayne first worked on a film set in 1916, at the age of nine, an outdoor studio almost in his backyard.

This section of the filmography covers Wayne's uncredited work in feature films, focusing on his early years in Hollywood. As such it is incomplete and at times wrought with conflicting information.

Annie Laurie: “Wayne and several other USC friends worked as costumed extras, wearing kilts, in the film.” (TJWF). Wayne recalled working in a Norman Kerry picture at MGM in which he was dressed in a Scotsman outfit but could not remember the title. Bardelys the Magnificent: “Wayne and his boyhood friend Pexy Eckles were hired as spear-carrying guards in the gallows scene.” (TJWF). The Black Watch: “Wayne worked on the film as a prop man.” (TJWF). As an extra (JWA). Wayne is visible in at least one scene (no dialogue). Born Reckless: “Wayne worked on this film in the capacity of a propman.” (TJWF). As an extra (JWA). Wayne appears very briefly as a soldier in the baseball scene. Brown of Harvard: “[Wayne] and several other USC footballers served as stand-ins for the actors. Wayne doubled for Francis X. Bushman, Jr.” (TJWF). Wayne can be seen on the football field as #17. Cancel My Reservation: Wayne appears in a dream sequence with one line of dialogue. Central Airport: As a co-pilot first seen on the wing of his downed plane, then floundering in the ocean (no dialogue). Cheer Up and Smile: “John Wayne plays Roy, Arthur Lake's fraternity brother, and it's a fairly decent supporting part, with quite a bit of dialogue in the first half of the film.” (IMDb user who viewed the film at the UCLA Film & Television Archive). Wayne also doubled as a prop man. College Coach: As a student greeting Dick Powell's character (three lines of dialogue). The Deceiver: As a corpse.

 

 

Possibly the first publicity photo ever taken of the soon-to-be John Wayne, captured during the production of Brown of Harvard, which began in late January 1926. Duke doubled for Francis X. Bushman, Jr. who was nowhere to be seen on the field, leaving the gridiron work to the eighteen-year-old USC student. According to actor Iron Eyes Cody, who remembered meeting Duke in the spring of 1926, “John Wayne took some [screen] tests at MGM and didn't pass.” The photo was taken by sports photographer Don Gillum (then under contract to MGM) at an empty Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. The back of the photo says “The Yale back is tackled for a loss. A scene from Brown of Harvard, which Jack Conway is directing for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.”

View an unedited clip where Duke is most visible in his feature film debut; 9.8 MB  

 

 

 

John Wayne appears in The Drop Kick (1927), seen here at bottom-right during a grandstand sequence that lasts about four seconds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Wayne in Four Sons (1928), a film in which he also worked as an assistant property man. View a full-size, cropped animated sequence (2.5 MB).

Or view a 2.1 MB half-size, uncropped video:  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click the film icon to view a video clip

 

Brown of Harvard (1926)

10.3 MB

Hangman's House (1928)

9.5 MB

Salute (1929)

  6.8 MB    

Men Without Women (1929)

  3.4 MB  

Rough Romance (1930)

  4.9 MB    

Central Airport (1933)

  4.1 MB  

College Coach (1933)

  1.5 MB    

I Married a Woman [#1] (1956)

  6.3 MB  

I Married a Woman [#2] (1956)

  3.8 MB    

Cancel My Reservation (1972)

  2.4 MB  

Arizona (1931)

  6.4 MB    

Maker of Men (1931)

  2.7 MB  

Lady and Gent (1932)

  4.0 MB    

The Range Feud (1931)

  2.8 MB  

Texas Cyclone (1932)

  4.4 MB    

His Private Secretary (1933)

  3.7 MB  

Baby Face (1933)

  2.5 MB    

The Life of Jimmy Dolan (1933)

  3.6 MB  

Two-Fisted Law (1932)

  3.7 MB    

The Shadow of the Eagle (1932)

  3.5 MB  

The Hurricane Express (1932)

  5.0 MB    

The Three Musketeers (1933)

  4.4 MB  

The Big Trail (1930)

  5.4 MB    

Haunted Gold (1932)

  4.5 MB  

Ride Him, Cowboy (1932)

  5.5 MB    

The Big Stampede (1932)

  4.4 MB  

Somewhere in Sonora (1933)

  4.4 MB    

The Telegraph Trail (1932)

  3.0 MB  

The Man from Monterey (1933)

  4.4 MB    

The Drop Kick (1927)

  2.5 MB  

Rookie of the Year (1955)

  3.7 MB    

Flashing Spikes (1962)

  4.5 MB  

 

John Wayne appears in Born Reckless (1930). View the scene here using stills and video.

John Wayne most likely appears in Bardelys the Magnificent (1926). View the scene here using stills and video.

John Wayne most likely appears in Mother Machree (1926); 1.7 MB  

John Wayne appears in The Black Watch (1929); 4.3 MB  

John Wayne most likely appears in the 2-reeler Careful Please (1926). View the scene here.

 

 

The Drop Kick: “Wayne was one of ten college football players (from Stanford, USC and UCLA), selected to appear as stand-ins and extras in the grandstands . . . .” (TJWF). The Forward Pass: extra. Four Sons: “Wayne worked as an assistant property man and may have participated as an extra in any one of the street sequences.” (TJWF). As an extra playing an officer (IMDb). The documentary The Duke at Fox confirms that Wayne played a police officer in a street scene. The Great K & A Train Robbery: “A young Wayne and several other USC teammates were hired to exercise with [Tom] Mix, keeping the star in shape, while the actor filmed on location. Once in Colorado, the young college athletes barely saw Mix, as their tasks were redirected towards the moving of props and driving vehicles.” (TJWF). “He propped the film, and that was it.” (JWA, although the book contradicts this in its own filmography, which says he played an extra). Hangman's House: “Wayne appeared in two sequences, of which only one survived the editing process.” (TJWF). “. . . Wayne is clearly visible in four shots, two of them centered on him.” (JWATM). Wayne also appears blindfolded in a dream sequence as a condemned man hanging from a rope, and in silhouette on the gallows; also as a person carrying what appears to be a doctor's bag.

I Married a Woman: Wayne appears in two different tongue-in-cheek roles: George Gobel and Diana Dors go to a theater and watch Wayne (as 'Leonard') and Angie Dickinson in an imaginary film called Forever and Forever and Forever, a film-within-a-film gag. Then Wayne appears at the end of the main film as himself, with two lines of dialogue. The Lone Star Ranger: As a wrangler, stunt double and bit player (TJWF). Men Without Women: “Besides being a prop man, [Wayne] drew extra pay as a stuntman during the diving sequences, was a sailor in the hapless submarine and played a radio operator on the rescue ship.” (TJWF). “[Wayne] had four or five lines to speak . . . .” (JWATM). Mother Machree: Prop man and extra. Noah's Ark: “Wayne and Andy Devine were hired as stunt swimmers.” (TJWF). Rough Romance: “Wayne, as a card player, is visible in two scenes and has one line of dialogue.” (TJWF).

Salute: “. . . Wayne joined Ward Bond and a number of football players that director John Ford had recruited from universities in the Los Angeles area to play out a complete game before the cameras. . . . Wayne also had some bits to play off the field as a cadet.” (JWATM). In one scene Ward Bond's character addresses Wayne's character as 'Bill'. Wayne appears throughout the film and has many small pieces of dialogue. The Shamrock Handicap: Wayne can be seen briefly in two crowd scenes. Speakeasy: “. . . Wayne was assigned to this film as a third or fourth assistant property man.” (TJWF). As an extra (JWA). Strong Boy: “Wayne was an extra and worked as a prop man.” (TJWF). Sweetheart of Sigma Chi: “Wayne's one scene in the film (with a mustache) was edited out of the final print.” (TJWF). View a publicity still from the film. That's My Boy: “Wayne's role in the film may be confined to stock footage utilized from the earlier Columbia film Maker of Men. Wayne is Taylor, the star player of the Harvard team, who is shown carrying and kicking the ball.” (TJWF). Women of All Nations: “The rare Fox production was originally 95 mins. but was cut to 72 mins. before release, eliminating small roles by both Humphrey Bogart and John Wayne (still visible in the background)! It was recently restored (still at 72 mins) by UCLA.” (Michael J. Weldon).

 

 

 

 

DVD Menu Gallery

 

 

 

     

 

Updated November 2, 2016, by Neil Roughley. Corrections, additions and comments are most welcome: wagonmaster@dukefilmography.com.

 

 

The Cowboys

Warner Bros. 114270
Region A/B/C (released 6-5-07)

1080p VC-1 [2.39:1]; Dolby Digital 5.1 [the music is 'true' stereo with the other audio remixed from mono]; 134 mins.

Big Jake

Paramount 14519
Region A/B/C (released 5-31-11)

1080p VC-1 [2.35:1]; DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 [remixed from mono] and DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 [remixed from mono]; 110 mins.

Rio Lobo

Paramount 14518
Region A/B/C (released 5-31-11)

1080p VC-1 [1.78:1]; DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 [remixed from mono] and DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 [remixed from mono]; 114 mins.

True Grit

Paramount 08293
Region A/B/C (released 12-14-10)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC [1.78:1]; DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 [remixed from mono] and Dolby Digital 2.0 mono; 128 mins.

Hellfighters

Universal 61166493
Region A/B/C (released 8-11-15)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC [2.35:1]; DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1; 121 mins.

The Green Berets

Warner Bros. 1000112712
Region A/B/C (released 1-5-10)

1080p VC-1 [2.40:1]; Dolby TrueHD 1.0 with embedded Dolby Digital 1.0; 142 mins.

The Greatest Story Ever Told

Fox/MGM M123227
Region A/B/C (released 3-29-11)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC [2.75:1]; DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1; 199 mins.

Circus World

Filmedia/Opening Euromediane Group (France) OPE104104
Region A/B/C (released 3-13-12)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC @ 24.00fps [2.20:1]; DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 stereo; 143 mins. The English soundtrack has forced French subtitles. Sourced from the original Technirama camera negative.

McLintock!

Paramount 915012
Region A/B/C (released 5-20-14)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC [2.39:1]; Dolby TrueHD 5.1 [remixed from mono] and Dolby TrueHD 1.0; 127 mins.

How the West Was Won

Warner Bros. 1000039748
Region A/B/C (released 9-9-08)

1080p VC-1 [2.89:1]; Dolby TrueHD 5.1 with embedded Dolby Digital 5.1; 165 mins. Disc 2 has the special SmileBox process transfer (1.95:1), simulating the 146° Cinerama screen, which is not included in any DVD edition.

The Longest Day

Fox 2251976
Region A (released 6-3-08)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC [2.35:1]; DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 and Dolby Digital 4.0; 178 mins. Disc 2, containing the special features, is a standard DVD.

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance

Paramount (various countries)
Region A/B/C (released 6-14-12)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC [1.78:1]; Dolby TrueHD 5.1 [remixed from mono] with embedded Dolby Digital 5.1, and Dolby Digital 2.0 mono; 123 mins.

The Comancheros

Fox 2270698
Region A/B/C (released 5-17-11)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC [2.35:1]; DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 and Dolby Digital 4.0; 107 mins.

North to Alaska

Fox 2292010
Region A/B/C (released 12-3-13)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC [2.35:1]; DTS-HD Master Audio 4.0; 122 mins.

The Horse Soldiers

Fox/MGM M123345
Region A/B/C (released 5-10-11)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC [1.66:1]; DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mono; 119 mins.

Rio Bravo

Warner Bros. 114272
Region A/B/C (released 6-5-07)

1080p VC-1 [1.78:1]; Dolby Digital 1.0; 141 mins.

The Barbarian and the Geisha

Fox 2279900
Region A/B/C (released 5-8-12)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC [2.35:1]; DTS-HD Master Audio 4.0; 105 mins. Also includes the DVD version.

Legend of the Lost

Koch Media (Germany) DBM000171D
Region A/B/C (released 12-2-11)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC [2.35:1]; DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mono; 108 mins.

The Searchers

Warner Bros. 111532
Region A/B/C (released 10-31-06)

1080p VC-1 [1.78:1]; Dolby Digital 1.0; 119 mins.

The Conqueror

Soul Media (Denmark) 57292DK
Region B (released 11-9-11)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC [2.35:1]; DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1; 111 mins. Also includes the DVD version.

Hondo

Paramount 14619
Region A/B/C (released 6-5-12)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC [1.78:1]; Dolby TrueHD 5.1 [remixed from mono] with embedded Dolby Digital 2.0 mono; 83 mins.

The Quiet Man

Olive Films OF484
Region A (released 1-22-13)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 129 mins.

Rio Grande

Olive Films OF450
Region A/B/C (released 8-7-12)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 105 mins.

Wake of the Red Witch

Olive Films OF594
Region A (released 4-23-13)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 107 mins.

Red River

Criterion Collection CC2359BDDVD-1/2
Region A (released 5-27-14)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; LPCM 1.0; 127 and 133 mins. (both versions).

Fort Apache

Warner Bros. 922208
Region A/B/C (released 2-21-12)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 128 mins.

The Fighting Seabees

Olive Films OF588
Region A (released 4-23-13)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 100 mins.

In Old Oklahoma

Olive Films OF614
Region A (released 4-23-13)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 102 mins.

Lady for a Night

Olive Films OF548
Region A (released 2-26-13)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 87 mins.

A Man Betrayed

Olive Films OF576
Region A (released 3-26-13)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 82 mins.

New Frontier

Olive Films OF524
Region A (released 1-22-13)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 55 mins.

Wyoming Outlaw

Olive Films OF586
Region A (released 3-26-13)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 56 mins.

Three Texas Steers

Olive Films OF478
Region A/B/C (released 10-2-12)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 56 mins.

The Night Riders

Olive Films OF472
Region A/B/C (released 10-2-12)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 56 mins.

Stagecoach

Criterion Collection CC1864BD
Region A (released 5-25-10)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; LPCM 1.0; 96 mins.

Red River Range

Olive Films OF476
Region A/B/C (released 10-2-12)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 56 mins.

Santa Fe Stampede

Olive Films OF612
Region A (released 4-23-13)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 55 mins.

Overland Stage Raiders

Olive Films OF474
Region A/B/C (released 10-2-12)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 55 mins.

King of the Pecos

Olive Films OF522
Region A (released 1-22-13)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 55 mins.

The Lawless Nineties

Olive Films OF574
Region A (released 3-26-13)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 56 mins.

The New Frontier

Olive Films OF520
Region A (released 1-22-13)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 54 mins.

Westward Ho

Olive Films OF584
Region A (released 3-26-13)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 61 mins.

The Big Trail

Fox 2281182
Region A/B/C (released 5-8-12)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC [Grandeur version: 2.10:1; also includes the full-frame version]; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 122 mins. [Grandeur version], 108 mins. [full-frame version]. Also includes the DVD version.

The Lonely Trail

Olive Films OF630
Region A (released 4-30-13)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 56 mins.

Pals of the Saddle

Olive Films OF640
Region A (released 4-30-13)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 55 mins.

Three Faces West

Olive Films OF642
Region A (released 4-30-13)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 79 mins.

Rooster Cogburn

Universal UK 829 433 4
Region A/B/C (released 5-6-13)

1080p VC-1 [2.35:1]; DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mono; 107 mins.

The War Wagon

Universal UK 829 433 2
Region A/B/C (released 5-6-13)

1080p VC-1 [2.35:1]; DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mono; 101 mins.

Angel and the Badman

Olive Films OF700
Region A (released 7-30-13)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 100 mins.

Flame of Barbary Coast

Olive Films OF664
Region A (released 6-18-13)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 91 mins.

Lady from Louisiana

Olive Films OF632
Region A (released 5-28-13)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 83 mins.

Dark Command

Olive Films OF662
Region A (released 5-28-13)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 93 mins.

In Old California

Olive Films OF652
Region A (released 5-28-13)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 88 mins.

Bullfighter and the Lady

Olive Films OF682
Region A (released 7-30-13)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 124 mins.

El Dorado

Paramount 446588
Region A/B/C (released 3-11-14)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC [1.78:1]; Dolby TrueHD 1.0; 126 mins.

Hatari!

Paramount 446625
Region A/B/C (released 3-11-14)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC [1.78:1]; Dolby TrueHD 1.0; 157 mins.

The Fighting Kentuckian

Olive Films OF736
Region A (released 9-24-13)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 100 mins.

The Undefeated

Fox 2292012
Region A/B/C (released 12-3-13)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC [2.35:1]; DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 [remixed from mono] and DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 118 mins.

Flying Tigers

Olive Films OF776
Region A (released 5-13-14)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 102 mins.

Brannigan

Twilight Time TWILIGHT97-BR
Region A/B/C (released 7-8-14)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC [2.35:1]; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 111 mins.

Cast a Giant Shadow

Kino Lorber Studio Classics 1632
Region A (released 8-26-14)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC [2.35:1]; DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mono; 138 mins.

Sands of Iwo Jima

Olive Films OF820
Region A (released 11-11-14)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 109 mins.

Cahill: United States Marshal

Warner Bros. 531105
Region A/B/C (released 6-2-15)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC [2.40:1]; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 102 mins.

The Train Robbers

Warner Bros. 531110
Region A/B/C (released 6-2-15)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC [2.40:1]; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 92 mins.

The Long Voyage Home

The Corporation/L'Atelier d'images (France)
Region B (released 10-20-15)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC @25.00fps; DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0; 101 mins.

The Shootist

Pidax Film Media (Germany)
Region B (released 4-15-16)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; Dolby Digital 2.0; 99 mins.

She Wore a Yellow Ribbon

Warner Bros. 1000600528
Region A/B/C (released 6-7-16)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0; 104 mins.

McQ

Warner Bros. 1000588587
Region A/B/C (released 6-7-16)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0; 111 mins.

Chisum

Warner Bros. 1000588585
Region A/B/C (released 6-7-16)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0; 111 mins.

They Were Expendable

Warner Bros. 1000600529
Region A/B/C (released 6-7-16)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0; 135 mins.

'Neath the Arizona Skies

Olive Films OF1243
Region A (released 7-19-16)

1080p MPEG-4 AVC; DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0; 52 mins.